The Catholic University of America

School of Arts and Sciences

Officers of Instruction

Faculty

Lawrence R. Poos, Ph.D.
Dean; Professor of History
Hanna Marks, Ph.D.
Associate Dean, Graduate Studies; Associate Professor of German
Peter Shoemaker, Ph.D.
Associate Dean, Undergraduate Studies; Associate Professor of French; Director, University Honors Program
Kerstin T. Gaddy, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Studies; 
Clinical Assistant Professor of German
Claire E. Adams, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology
Nancy E. Adleman, Ph.D. Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology
Niki Akhavan, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Media Studies
Jon W. Anderson, Ph.D.
Professor of Anthropology
Juanita Cristina Aristizábal Peraza, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Spanish
Diane B. Arnkoff, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of Psychology
Gregory E. Baker, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of English
Anamaria Banu, Ph.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor of French
Aaron Barkatt, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry
Sandra Barrueco, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychology
Gail Beach, M.F.A.
Associate Professor for Professional Practice in Drama
Kiran R. Bhutani, Ph.D.
Professor of Mathematics
Maxwell H. Bloomfield III, Ph.D., J.D.
Professor Emeritus of History
Uta-Renate Blumenthal, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of History
Victor M. Bogdan, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Kathryn E. Bojczyk, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Education
Claudia Bornholdt, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of German
James F. Brennan, Ph.D.
Provost of the University; Professor of Psychology
Greg A. Brewer, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry
Diane Bunce, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry
Ronald S. Calinger, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History
Gonzalo Campos-Dintrans, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of Spanish
Agnes Cave, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Education
Renate L. Chancellor, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Library and Information Science
Phyllis P. Chock, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of Anthropology
Youngok Choi, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Library and Information Science
John Choy, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology
Deborah M. Clawson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychology
Lucy M. Cohen, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of Anthropology
Thomas M. Cohen, Ph.D.
Curator, Oliveira Lima Library; Associate Professor of History
Daniel Colón, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of Spanish
John J. Convey, Ph.D.
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Professor of Education
Anita G. Cook, Ph.D.
Professor of Anthropology
Edward M. Cook, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures
Ann K. Corsi, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biology
Dennis Coyle, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
Hall L. Crannell, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Bruno M. Damiani, Ph.D.
Professor of Spanish
Christopher N. Darnton, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Politics
Jennifer R. Davis, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of History
Charles R. Dechert, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Politics
Duilia de Mello, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Physics
Thomas F. Donahue, Ph.D.
Professor of Drama
Biprodas Dutta, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Physics
Sherif El-Helaly, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Serena Ferrando, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of Italian
Sarah Brown Ferrario, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Greek and Latin
John G. Figura, M.F.A.
Assistant Professor for Professional Practice of Art
Rosalind M. Flynn, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of Drama
Rona Frederick, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Education
Daniel Garcia-Donoso, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Spanish
Daniel R. Gibbons, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of English
Carol R. Glass, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Paul G. Glenn, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Marcie Goeke-Morey, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychology
John E. Golin, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Matthew N. Green, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
James J. Greene, Ph.D.
Dean of Graduate Studies; Professor of Biology
Tobias Gregory, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English
Rev. Sidney H. Griffith, Ph.D.
Professor of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures
Joan Tasker Grimbert, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of French
Andrew D. Gross, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures
Rev. Thomas P. Halton, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Greek and Latin
Sandra L. Hanson, Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology
Heather R. Haverback, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Education
Marietta Hedges, M.F.A.
Associate Professor of Drama
Nora M. Heimann, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Art
Jean-Michel Heimonet, Ph.D.
Professor of French
Dorle Hellmuth, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Politics
Philip Henderson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
J. Benjamin Hinnant, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology
Eleanor Holdridge, M.F.A. Assistant Professor of Drama
Tanja Horn, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Physics
Barbara J. Howard, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biology
James H. Howard, Jr., Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Ingrid Hsieh-Yee, Ph.D. Professor of Library and Information Science
Shufen Hwang, M.A. Clinical Instructor of Chinese
Katherine L. Jansen, Ph.D.
Professor of History
David A. Jobes, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Glen M. Johnson, Ph.D. Professor of English
Martin L. Johnson, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Media Studies
Margaret Ann Kassen, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of French and Spanish
Chisup Kim, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Sung Un Kim, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Library and Information Science
Michael C. Kimmage, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
Franz Klein, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Physics
K. Jon Klein, M.F.A.
Associate Professor of Drama
Árpád von Klimó, Ph.D. Associate Professor of History
William E. Klingshirn, Ph.D.
Professor of Greek and Latin
Vadim Knyazev, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry
Lilla Kopár, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English
Ildiko M. Kovach, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of Chemistry
Steven Kraemer, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics
John A. Kromkowski, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
William M. Kules, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Library and Information Science
Jack R. Leibowitz, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Alexander Levin, Ph.D.
Professor of Mathematics
Todd M. Lidh, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of English
Dolores Lima, M.A. Clinical Assistant Professor of Spanish
Guoyang Liu, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Maryann Cusimano Love, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
Stefania Lucamante, Ph.D.
Professor of Italian
Rev. John E. Lynch, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History and Canon Law
Pedro B. Macedo, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Michael Mack, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English
Frank A.C. Mantello, Ph.D.
Professor of Greek and Latin
Laura E. Nym Mayhall, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
William J. McCarthy, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Greek and Latin
Stephen J. McKenna, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Media Studies
Charmaine L. McMahon, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of Spanish
Farzana McRae, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Timothy Meagher, Ph.D.
University Archivist; Associate Professor of History
Paul H.E. Meijer, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Gregory J. Miller, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Nelson H. Minnich, Ph.D.
Professor of History and Church History
Jonathan Monaghan, M.F.A. Assistant Professor of Art
Elizabeth Montanaro, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Education
Jean Dietz Moss, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of English
Jerry Z. Muller, Ph.D.
Professor of History
J. Michael Mullins, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Thomas V. Nakashima, M.F.A.
Professor Emeritus of Art
Roland M. Nardone, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Biology
Virgil P. Nemoianu, Ph.D.
William J. Byron, S.J., Professor of Literature
Ekaterina M. Nestorovich, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Biology
James P. O'Connor, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Psychology
Sister Anne O'Donnell, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of English
Taryn L. Okuma, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of English
James P. O'Leary, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
Mario A. Ortiz, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Spanish
Jennifer Paxton, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of History
Ian L. Pegg, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics
Kathleen Perencevich, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Education
Judith Perez, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of Sociology
John F. Petruccione, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Greek and Latin
John Philip, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Physics
Franklin H. Portugal, Ph.D.
Clinical Associate Professor of Biology
Enrique Pumar, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
Rebecca Rainof Mas, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of English
Venigalla B. Rao, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Lorenzo L. Resca, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics
Brendan A. Rich, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology
Mario A. Rojas, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Spanish
Raluca Romaniuc, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of French
Bruce M. Ross, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Psychology
Katharina Rudolf, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of German
Kevin Rulo, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of English
Alexander T. Russo, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Media Studies
Claes G. Ryn, Ph.D.
Professor of Politics
Martin A. Safer, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Abhijit Sarkar, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Physics
Stephen F. Schneck, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
Merylann J. Schuttloffel, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Education
Marc M. Sebrechts, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Joseph M. Sendry, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of English
J. Prasad Senesi, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Jason T. Sharples, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of History
Amanda Sheffer, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of German
Joshua K. Shepperd, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Media Studies
Caroline R. Sherman, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of History
David E. Shumaker, M.S. Clinical Assistant Professor of Library and Information Science
Irene Slagle, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry
Gary Sloan, M.F.A.
Professor of Drama
Daniel I. Sober, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics
Lawrence Somer, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Vijay Sookdeo, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Chelsea Stieber, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of French
Ernest F. Suarez, Ph.D.
Professor of English
D. Paul Sullins, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
Antanas Suziedelis, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Psychology
Sue Yeon Syn, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Library and Information Science
Leslie Woodcock Tentler, Ph.D.
Professor of History
Wallace J. Thies, Ph.D.
Professor of Politics
Patrick Tuite, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Drama
Pamela L. Tuma, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biology
Herbert M. Überall, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Maura Ugarte, M.F.A. Clinical Assistant Professor of Media Studies
Joan B. Urban, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of Politics
Vadim Uritsky, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Physics
Barry Wagner, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Shavaun Wall, Ph.D.
Euphemia Lofton Haynes Professor of Education
Rev. William A. Wallace, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History and Philosophy
David J. Walsh, Ph.D.
Professor of Politics
Pamela S. Ward, Ph.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor of English
Lev Weitz, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of History
Carl W. Werntz, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Stephen A. West, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
Christopher J. Wheatley, Ph.D.
Professor of English
John K. White, Ph.D.
Professor of Politics
Gary J. Williams, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Drama
John R. Winslow, M.F.A.
Professor Emeritus of Art
Rosemary Winslow, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English
Stephen K. Wright, Ph.D.
Professor of English
Andrew Yeo, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Politics
Julia Young, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of History
James E. Youniss, Ph.D.  Professor Emeritus of Psychology
Jane Zhang, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Library and Information Science


 

Associates of the Faculty

Mohammed Adel-Hadadi, Ph.D. Research Associate, Chemistry
Arthur Aikin, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Physics
Michael Bell, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor of Physics
Boncho Bonev, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Cynthia Brewer, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemistry
Jeffrey Brosius, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Carole W. Brown, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Education
Ronald Carlson, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Mario E. Cerritelli, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Biology
Peter C. Chen, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor of Physics
Pamela Clark, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Patrick Collins, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Lawrence Cook, Ph.D. Research Professor of Chemistry
Daniel M. Crenshaw, Ph.D. Research Assistant Professor of Physics
Dana Hurley Crider, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor of Physics
Jennifer A. Crumlish, Ph.D. Research Associate, Psychology
Leonard DeFiore, Ed.D.
Research Assistant Professor and Brother Patrick Ellis Chair of Education
Michael DiSanti, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics
Artem Feofilov, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Frank Ferguson, Ph.D. Research Associate, Chemistry
Natchimuthukonar Gopalswamy, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Physics
Theodore Gull, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Physics
Sergio Ipatov, Ph.D. Research Associate, Physics
Rosina Iping, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Sungmu Kang, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Keith A. Kaufman, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Psychology
Gladys Vieira Kober, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Yoji Kondo, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Physics
Maxim Kramar, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Vladimir Krasnopolsky, Ph.D.
Research Professor of Physics
Alexander Kutepov, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Allen Lunsford, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
MIldred Martin, Ph.D. Research Associate, Chemistry
Patrick Mehl, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics
Benjamin Michael, Ph.D. Research Associate, Chemistry
Donald J. Michels, Ph.D.
Research Professor of Physics
Ryan Milligan, Ph.D. Research Associate, Physics
Robert K. Mohr, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Marla Moore, Ph.D. Research Associate Professor of Chemistry
Thomas Moran, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor of Physics
Isabelle Müller, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physics
Norman F. Ness, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Krister Nielson, Ph.D.
Research Aassistant Professor of Physics
Sten Odenwald, Ph.D. Research Associate, Physics
Leon Ofman, Ph.D. Research Professor of Physics
Vladimir Osherovich, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Judit Pap, Ph.D. Research Associate, Physics
Sergio Picozzi, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physics
Lutz Rastaetter, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Nelson Reginald, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Michael Reiner, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Joachim Schmidt, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Richard Schwartz, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
John Sczepanski, Ph.D. Research Associate, Chemistry
Malgorzata Selwa, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Myron A. Smith, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Andrea Sobel, Ph.D.
Clinical Associate, Education
Richard Starr, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Janet A. Timbie, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures
Ekaterina Verner, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Geronimo Villanueva, Ph.D. Research Associate, Physics
Glen M. Wahlgren, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Gerald Williger, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Hong Xie, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Seiji Yashiro, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics

Objectives

 

Mission Statement

 

 

The School of Arts and Sciences of The Catholic University of America:

 

  • Performs a central role in the larger mission of CUA as the national university of the Catholic Church in the United States, and standswithin the Catholic intellectual traditionin direct succession to the heritage of Catholic universities

 

  • Enriches educational and research opportunities, enhances cultural life, and engages public discourse through its location in the nation’s capital, as intended by the university’s founders

 

  • Encompasses the arts and humanities, the social sciences, and the natural sciences, and is uniquely capable of fostering collaboration among the disciplines

 

  • Comprises faculty united in its dedication to integrating research and scholarship with undergraduate and graduate teaching to the highest standards of academic excellence

 

  • Educates its students academically and ethically, and provides them with the knowledge, reason, and inspiration to comprehend and lead in a changing world

Administration

In 1975, the Graduate School and the College of Arts and Sciences were combined to form the present School of Arts and Sciences.

The Academic Council, composed of the heads of departments with the dean as chair, is the standing committee of the faculty, with the primary responsibility for the administration of the school. The Academic Council operates under the supervision of the chancellor, president, provost and dean. Its recommendations are made to these and other proper authorities, as well as to the faculty. Such recommendations include, among others, the approval of candidates for degrees. The faculty is represented, proportionally to its size, along with the other schools of the university, in the Academic Senate, a combined administration-faculty body having primary responsibility for academic policies and procedures, and in the graduate and undergraduate boards, faculty committees, which oversee university-wide academic matters.

Degree programs within the school are provided through the various departments of instruction.

Department of Anthropology

Professors

Jon W. Anderson, Chair; Lucy M. Cohen (emerita); Anita Cook

Lecturers

David T. Clark; Blenda Femenias; Patricia S. Maloof; Marilyn Merritt; Tadeusz Mich; Raul Sanchez Molina; Sandra Scham, James Doyle
 
 
Anthropology incorporates interdisciplinary studies of both past and contemporary socio-cultural and physical aspects of human material culture, values, beliefs, social and communicative systems into a distinctive holistic approach. Our goal is to train informed consumers of anthropological knowledge who can conduct and review research in the field and can apply basic perspectives of anthropology, its core concepts , and common methods of analysis to interpretation and/or solution of problems.
 
The Master of Arts in Anthropology offers a grounding in the discipline for students seeking to upgrade skills and credentials, to supplement training in professional fields, or to explore advanced research training in social-cultural anthropology or archaeology. Through a combination of course work and research training, all M.A. students receive training in (1) core perspectives and contemporary theories in anthropology, (2) research methods and conduct, including ethical issues of research with human subjects and cultural property, (3) grounding in professional literature of area or regional studies, and (4) one of the topical specialties of current faculty. With permission of the Chair, M.A. students can also enroll in courses available at member institutions of the Consortium of Washington Area Universities (Georgetown, George Washington, American, Howard, Maryland, George Mason, Trinity-Washington, Gallaudet) that complement or enhance training in our specialties.

Requirements and Prerequisites

Results of the Graduate Record Examination must be submitted by all applicants. M.A. students must take a pair of core courses (ANTH 600, 601) and at least one specialty and one area course. M.A. candidates are expected to acquire a general competence in an area of the world and familiarity with one or more subfields, such as medical anthropology, cultural analysis, ecological or economic anthropology, or archaeology. The minimum requirement for the M.A. is 30 graduate semester hours of credit, up to six of which may be in guided research. In addition to a thesis option, a nonthesis option is available at the M.A. level. M.A. students must also demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language by passing an appropriate course or examination, administered or accepted by the Graduate School (where appropriate, this may also be a language of field research), and pass a comprehensive examination. Satisfactory performance in coursework must be maintained to continue in the M.A. program. One F or two C grades are cause for review and termination.

The deadline for receipt of graduate application, transcripts, test scores and recommendations is April 1 for September registration,  Nov. 15 for January registration, and February 1 for financial  awards.

Assistantships and Professional Membership

The department offers a limited number of teaching assistantships and research assistantships for graduate students. The Cooper-Herzfeld Anthropological Society is an association of graduate and undergraduate anthropology students.

Courses Offered

Please consult the department Web site at http://anthropology.cua.edu/ for descriptions and schedule of courses offered in the current semester.

 

ANTH Course Title
505 Applied Anthropology Lecture
506 Applied Archaeology Lecture
508

Anthropology, Migration and Transnationalism: Ethnography & Policy Lecture

560 Method and Theory in Archaeology Lecture
580 Selected Topics in Area Studies Directed Reading
590 Ethnohistory Lecture
600 Anthropological Perspectives Seminar
601 Research Design and Conduct Seminar
608 Anthropology, Migration and Transnationalism: Ethnography & Policy Seminar
610 Islam in the Modern World Seminar
616 Globalization Seminar
617 Migrants and Refugees Seminar
618 Environmental Degradation Seminar
622 Early States and Empires Seminar
624 Archaeology of Settlements and Landscapes Seminar
639 Anthropology of Gender Seminar
640 Ethnicity Seminar
642 Ethnopsychology Seminar
650 Political Anthropology Seminar
654 South American Archaeology Seminar
655 Latinos and Latinas in the United States Seminar
659 Prehistoric Art and Architecture Seminar
660 Anthropology of Religion Seminar
664 Incas Seminar
666 Ethnography of the United States Seminar
670 Information Technology & Culture Seminar
672 Cultural Analysis Seminar
680 Social Anthropology of Latin America Seminar
690 Middle East Seminar
696 Thesis Guidance (M.A.)
698 A

Comprehensive Exam (M.A.) with classes

698 B Comprehensive Exam (M.A.) without classes
707 Applied Anthropology in the Ministry
717 Migration, Culture and Health Seminar
720 Problems in Medical Anthropology Seminar
741 Health, Society and Culture Lecture
744 Colloquium: Current Trends in Applied Anthropology Seminar
793 Student-Faculty Research
796 Student-Faculty Research

Department of Art

Professors Emeriti Thomas Nakashima; John R. Winslow
Associate Professor Nora M. Heimann, Chair
Clinical Assistant Professor John G. Figura
Assistant Professor Jonathan Monaghan
Lecturers

Jeffrey Andrews; Robert Barnard; Matthew Barrick; Peter Dueker; David Gariff; Steve Jones; Stephanie Kay; Kevin Mitchell; Manuel Navarrete; Nina O'Neil; Beverly Ress; Erik Sandberg; Kim Sels; Lara Yeager-Crasselt

The Department of Art is not admitting students to the graduate degree programs for the 2013-2014 academic year. Nevertheless, the department does offer courses in the areas of art history and studio art for graduate credit. A low student-faculty ratio ensures that students receive individual attention in every class. A student who wishes to take graduate courses in the Department of Art, either for credit or as an auditor, may apply for admission as a special, Non-Degree student.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

ART

Course Title

501

Splendors of Byzantium

508

Drawing and Painting

528 Ceramics Art
531 Introduction to Digital Arts

533

West. Medieval Art & Arch

534 Sculpting Saints, Angels & Demons
566 The Allure of Egypt

571

Advanced Ceramics Art

574 Islamic Art & Arch
585 Methods & Concepts: Art Education
590 A World Filled with Gods

594H

Independent Study - Art History
594S Independent Study - Studio Art
595H Internship - Art History
595S Internship - Studio Art
614 Architecture of Ancient Rome
615 Architecture of Renaissance Venice
619 Renaissance Art
620 Baroque Art
621 Venetian Renaissance Art
623 Nineteenth Century Art
624 Impressionism & Realism
626 American Art & Culture
631 Modern Art: Post-Impr. (1880s-1945)
632 Contemporary Art (1945 to Present)
633 Digital Applications for Fine Arts
651 Graduate Seminar
655 Art of the Renaissance
665 Selected Topics-18th,19th & 20th C
667 Van Gogh & His Circle
668 Michelangelo, Leonardo, Raphael
670 Selected Problems Chinese & Jap. Art
671 Graduate Ceramics
672 Graduate Ceramics Art
673 Virtues and Vices
681 Graduate Figure Painting&Drwng
682 Graduate Figure Painting&Drwng
683 Video Production
685 Screen Printing
751 Art in the Museums

 

Department of Biology

Professors John E. Golin; James J. Greene; J. Michael Mullins; Venigalla B. Rao, Chair
Professor Emeritus Roland M. Nardone

Associate Professors

Clinical Associate Professor and Director, Biotechnology Program

Ann K. Corsi; Barbara J. Howard; Pamela Tuma

Franklin Portugal

Assistant Professor John Choy; Ekaterina Nestorovich
Adjunct Associate Professor Mario E. Cerritelli
Assistant to the Chair and Premedical Coordinator Marion B. Ficke
Lecturers Lori Estes; Rebecca Sheets

The Department of Biology offers Master of Science, M.S., and Doctor of Philosophy, Ph.D., degrees in biology, with emphasis in cell, microbial, and molecular biology, The M.S. and Ph.D. degrees are also offered in clinical laboratory science. A Certificate in Biotechnology and Master of Science in Biotechnology are also offered. When applying for admission, please indicate the preferred program.

The purpose of the M.S. and Ph.D. program in biology is to prepare students for research, teaching, and administrative careers in the biological or the biomedical sciences. Courses in this program provide a foundation in biochemistry, cell biology, developmental biology, genetics, microbiology, molecular biology and virology. In addition, presentations and participation in a graduate seminar program prepare students to be effective teachers and communicators. All graduate students accepted in the doctoral program are required to do some teaching during graduate training. To fulfill thesis /dissertation requirements, a student performs experimental research under the tutelage of the faculty. Fields of research concentration currently include transcriptional regulation and development in C. elegans, membrane dynamics and trafficking in polarized cells, alcohol metabolism in liver, structure and function of molecular motors, genetic engineering approaches to epitope presentation and vaccine development, cellular response to weak electromagnetic fields, genetic analysis of multiple drug resistance, mechanisms of DNA packaging in bacteriophages and viruses, molecular biology of cancer and metastasis, regulation of gene expression during muscle development and membrane trafficking in polarized epithelial cells, bacterial growth self-inhibition, biosensors design,and ion-conducting nanostructures in biomedical applications, genome scale approaches to elucidating mechanisms of genomic instability (please visit http://biology.cua.edu/faculty/ for detailed descriptions of faculty research.

The purpose of the program in Biotechnology is to provide students with a solid technical foundation together with an understanding of how to conduct the business of biotechnology.  Students take a selection of core requirements and elective courses.  An internship in industrial or federal research, policy development, environmental action, public interest, or professional activity is also required. Although not required, it is strongly recommended that applicants submit results of the Graduate Record Examination for admission into the biotechnology program.

Standard prerequisites for graduate work in biology  (M.S. or Ph.D.) include two years of chemistry, two years of biology (including biochemistry and microbiology), one year of physics and one year of calculus. Students are encouraged to apply for admission even if all prerequisites are not fulfilled. A student admitted to the department with a deficiency will be advised to take the required courses during the first year of graduate work. Applicants must include results of the Graduate Record Examination.

The purpose of the Ph.D. program in Clinical Laboratory Science is to prepare individuals to assume positions as directors of clinical laboratories, as researchers, or as faculty of medical technology programs. Students first receive a broad background in basic sciences, biomolecular sciences and clinical laboratory sciences, and then proceed to specialize in clinical chemistry, clinical microbiology or clinical hematology. Students may complete their dissertation research in the Department of Biology at The Catholic University of America or at one of the affiliated hospitals or research institutions. After receiving a broad science background, as described above, students in the M.S. program specialize in laboratory management or one of the clinical laboratory disciplines. The course work will be customized depending on the student's background and career goals. Applicants must submit results of the Graduate Record Examination and scores of a medical technology certification examination.

The School of Library and Information Science and the Department of Biology offer a joint master's program. (Contact Chair, Department of Biology for further details.)

The Department of Biology accepts both full-time and part-time graduate students. Academic progress is  reviewed regularly. A failing grade or two C grades totaling 6 credits may result in termination. In addition to the thesis options described above, a non-thesis option is available at the M.S. level. Applications from women and minority students are encouraged for all programs. Financial aid is available as university scholarships, teaching assistantships and research assistantships.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

BIOL Course Title
518 Physiology
538 Gene Organization and Expression
540 Mechanisms of Gene Mutation and Transmission
549 General Microbiology
554 Biological Chemistry
559 Cell Structure and Function
560 Emerging Infectious Diseases
563 Developmental Biology
565 Model Organisms and Human Disease
566 Immunology
574 Virology
577 Research Problems in Biology I
578 Research Problems-Biology II

579

Principles and Practice of Biotechnology

580 Entrepreneurial Biotechnology
581 Essentials of Biotechnology Program Management
582 Biotechnology Internship
583 Regulatory Process for Domestic and Global Biotechnology
584 Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis

586

Molecular Genetics and Recombinant DNA Methodology

589 Introduction to Nanobiotechnology
595 Molecular Biotechnology
596 Computational Genomics
598 Membrane Trafficking and Disease
599 Signal Transduction and Membranes
703 Seminar
704 Seminar
713 Microbiology Seminar I
714 Microbiology Seminar II
725 Methods-Biological Research Lab
727 Methods-Biological Research
765 Research Topics in Biology I
766 Research Topics in Biology II
771 Research Problems in Biology I
772 Research Problems in Biology II
774 Comparative Metabolism
777 Cell Biology Seminar I

778

Cell Biology Seminar II

781 Biotechnology and Clinical Laboratory Science Seminar I
782 Biotechnology and Clinical Laboratory Science Seminar II
696 Thesis-Masters
698A Master's Comprehensive Exam with classes
698B  Master's Comprehensive Exam without classes
998A Doctoral Comprehensive Exam with classes
998B Doctoral Comprehensive Exam without classes
996 Dissertation-Doctoral

 

 

Department of Chemistry

Professors Greg Brewer, Chair; Aaron Barkatt; Diane Bunce; Irene Slagle; Vadim Knyazev
Professor Emerita Ildiko Kovach
Assistant Professor Gregory Miller
Adjunct Associate Professor Cynthia Brewer

The Department of Chemistry is only admitting students to the PhD program in chemical education for the 2013/14 academic year. 

The PhD in Chemistry at the Catholic University of America in the area of specialization of Chemical Education is an interdisciplinary field that addresses problems in the Teaching and Learning of Chemistry content using the learning theories of Education, the developmental theories of Psychology, and the research methodologies and psychometrics of Education, Psychology, Sociology and Statistics. As an interdisciplinary field, the PhD degree in Chemical Education relies on strong scholarship in chemistry, education, psychology/sociology and statistics. The program includes coursework in these departments and research in the chemistry department on the application of these theories and research methodologies to the problems of teaching and learning chemistry. 

It is expected that most graduates of this PhD program will seek employment as professors of Chemical Education in either a Chemistry or Science Education Department of a college or university. To prepare students for this, those admitted to this program must have successfully completed an undergraduate degree in chemistry or an allied science as well as a masters’ degree or its equivalent in a chemistry or a chemistry related field at a strong level (GPA=3.0 or higher). It is expected that students will transfer in graduate chemistry or chemistry related credit to the PhD program from their masters’ level work that would be equivalent to the chemistry core courses that are normally required in a PhD Chemistry degree. Any student found deficient in one area of the core would be required to take appropriate chemistry courses from our listing at CUA. In special cases, a course might be taken from the Consortium. Students who receive two grades of C or below in the Chemical Education PhD program are subject to review and possible dismissal.

Applicants must also have some prior chemistry teaching experience (middle or secondary level science/chemistry teacher, graduate teaching assistant, or chemistry lecturer/course coordinator/teaching laboratory supervisor) for a minimum of one year. Two or more years are recommended. For acceptance, GRE (verbal and quantitative scores) should be at the 1200 or higher level and applicants should demonstrate familiarity with the field of chemical education research and a firm desire to complete further study in this field. The program looks for independent thinkers who are well versed in the problems involved with teaching and learning chemistry. 

In addition to these core chemistry courses, the specialization courses in chemical education (Chemistry), learning theory (Education), statistics (Education or Sociology), and cognitive psychology (Psychology or Education) are required. Students will be required to take 38 credits beyond their previous masters’ degree in chemistry or chemically related field.

Applications from women and minority students are encouraged. Financial aid is available as university teaching assistantships in the chemistry department and research assistantships on chemical education grants.

 Required Courses for the PhD program in Chemical Education

Please consult the registrar's website at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

Upon consideration for acceptance into the program, students' transcripts will be evaluated for equivalent courses to the CUA chemistry core described below. Possible substitutions for deficiencies are included in Column #3. Students who do not have courses equivalent to the CUA Chemistry core will be required to make up that deficiency in addition to their new courses.

Course #

Course Title

Possible Substitution within CUA

CHEM 501

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry

(Offered in CUA Chem Dept.)

Chem 503

Survey of Organic Reactions

Chem 571 - General Biochemistry II
(Offered in CUA Chem Dept.)

Chem 504

Mechanistic Chemistry

Chem 572 Biochemistry II
(Offered in CUA Chem Dept.)

Chem 508

Instrumental Analysis and Chemical Spectroscopy

(Offered in CUA Chem Dept.)

Chem 535

Intro to Quantum Chemistry

Equivalent in CUA Physics Dept. or Consortium

Chem 530

Chemical Thermodynamics

Equivalent in CUA Physics Dept. or Consortium

The required courses for this program include courses from the chemistry and education departments with possible substitutions from the psychology or sociology departments.

Course #

Course Title

Possible Substitution within CUA

Chemical Education (9 credits)

Chem 593

Readings in Chemical Education

N/A

Chem 737

Chemical Education Research: Theory and Practice

N/A

Chem 767

Problems in Chemical Education Research

N/A

Chem 996 Dissertation Guidance N/A
Chem 998 Doctoral Comprehensive N/A 

Statistics (12 credits)

Educ 633

Intro to Statistics and Behavioral Sciences

May be waived if applicant has undergraduate or graduate statistics course

Educ 733

Experimental Design

N/A

Education or Psychology (9 credits)

Educ 525

Psychology of Learning

Psych 534 - Theories of Cognitive Development
(May be waived if applicant has equivalent course.)

Psych 304

Brain and Behavior

Educ 652 - Memory and Cognition: Psychology of Learning

Psych 371 - Cognitive Psychology

Psych 341- Psychology of Memory

Psych 679

Cognitive Science

Educ 732 - Issues in Memory and Cognition II

Psych 371 - Cognitive Psychology

Psych 341 - Psychology of Memory

Research

Program in Comparative Literature

PLEASE NOTE: Applications to this program are not being accepted until further notice

Administration of the Program

The comparative literature program is administered by the Interdepartmental Committee on General and Comparative Literature Studies. The committee comprises the professor of comparative literature, the director of the comparative literature program and the chairs of the departments of modern languages, English, Greek and Latin, and Semitic and Egyptian languages and literatures, with additional members from participating departments as deemed advisable.

Purpose of the Program

The program is designed (1) to train students in the general problems of literary history, theory and criticism; (2) to provide them with the historical and critical perspectives needed for comparative studies; and (3) to introduce them to the tools and methods needed for professional work in the field.

Prerequisites

To be accepted as a degree candidate in the program, a student should have training in at least two languages and literatures, with a preparation in one of them equivalent to an undergraduate major.

Course Offerings

In addition to courses of a specifically comparative nature, students have a range of offerings (including courses in genres, periods and individual authors) available to them in the participating departments. Such courses normally deal with one national literature. Through independent study and in consultation with their professors and with the director of the comparative literature program, students are expected to establish comparative relationships among national literatures. Students with interdisciplinary interests are permitted to take selected courses in areas such as the arts, music, politics, science, religion and other fields. Before applying to the program, prospective students are advised to consult the director as to the availability of offerings in the national literatures and subject areas in which they are interested.

Individual Programs

After the student has chosen a major field from those offered at The Catholic University of America (in classical, medieval European or modern Western literatures), a program, planned in consultation with the director of the program and the student's professors, will be arranged. It will include both "vertical" (diachronical) and "horizontal" (synchronical) components-courses, for example, on chronological developments in two or more literatures, such as the study of romanticism as an international movement. Students may also take advantage of courses available through the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area in order to supplement those offered at this university. In planning a program that also will prepare for the comprehensives, it is suggested that candidates make an early choice of a period or genre in the national literatures that are the subject of their study.

Course Requirements

At the first opportunity, students are required to take 701, Proseminar: Introduction to the Comparative Study of Literature; and 702, Proseminar: Modern Critical Movements.

Thirty semester credit hours are required for the M.A., distributed as follows: 12 hours in the major literature, six hours in the second literature, six hours in 701 and 702, and six hours in research guidance for M.A. with thesis. Two additional seminars (three semester credit hours each) may be substituted for the thesis. These are to be approved by the director and completed with a grade of B or better. (See Thesis section, below.)

Students are expected to maintain a minimum B level or B- in all their courses. Students who receive two course grades of C+ or below are subject to dismissal from the program.

Language Requirements

Comparative literature students are required to demonstrate proficiency in the languages of the literatures that are the topic of their study; besides their own first language, they must be proficient in at least one foreign language for the M.A. Ordinarily, comparative literature students will demonstrate proficiency in foreign languages by acceptable performance (a grade of B- or above) in two courses taken at the graduate level where works are studied in the original tongue. In cases where a university language requirement must be satisfied in a language other than those of the national literatures chosen for the program, that requirement may be fulfilled by means of a standardized test or an appropriate language course, as described in these Announcements in the introductory section relating to General Requirements for Graduate Study.

The programs of some students (e.g., those in medieval literature and in certain areas of Renaissance literature) may, in addition to the vernaculars involved in the study of their major and minor fields, require a reading knowledge of Latin. Determination of the applicability of this rule will be made in individual cases by the director of the comparative literature program. Such knowledge may be established by an examination administered by the Department of Greek and Latin or by a course in Latin given by the same department and approved by the director of the comparative literature program.

Comprehensive Examinations

M.A. comprehensives consist of two parts, which are taken separately: (1) methodology (three hours) and (2) either a period or a genre (or motif) in two literatures (four hours). Majors in Greek and Latin will take the examination in methodology and comparable sections of the departmental M.A. comprehensive.

Early in their programs, comparative literature students should consult with the director of the program to determine areas in which they will be examined and to plan the coursework and readings needed as preparation. No later than the beginning of the semester in which the comprehensive, or part thereof, is to be taken, they should notify the director of their intention to present themselves for the examination and should then confirm details of its administration.

Thesis

The thesis for the M.A. normally treats some aspect of the literature of the period of the candidate's major concentration. It should examine historical interrelations or structural comparison or theoretical problems involving works selected from two or more national literatures. The M.A. thesis is commonly replaced by two three-hour seminars (over and above the 24 required semester credit hours of coursework) approved by the director and completed with a grade of B or higher.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

CLIT Course Title
525 Image, Myth, and Democracy
530 Literary Criticism & Religion
535 The Romance of King Arthur
606 Shahrazad's Legacy:Mdvl Story
607 Medieval Women Writers
609 Drama in Medieval Europe
660 Holocaust in Euro Film/Fiction
661 Fictionalizing the City
670 Mod Demo fr Tocq to Sep 11
678 Scott and the Historical Novel
685 The European Bildungsroman
688 Eur Background of Amer Realism
696 Women in 20th C Autobio&Fictn
701 Prosem: Intro to Comp Lit
702 Prosem: Mod Critical Movements
761 Lit.Modern.Enlightmnt.20th Cen
763 The Modern Crisis in Film&Lit
765 Modernity & its Discontents
995 Thesis-Masters
996 Thesis-Master

Department of Drama

Professors Thomas F. Donahue; Gary K. Sloan
Professor Emeritus Gary J. Williams
Associate Professors Gail Beach,  Marietta Hedges; K. Jon Klein; Patrick Tuite, Chair
Assistant Professors Eleanor Holdridge; Rosalind M. Flynn
Lecturers  Dody DiSanto, Melissa Flaim, Casey Kaleba, Drew Lichtenberg, Brandon McCoy, Thomas Morra, Mary Naden, Janet Stanford, Brent Stansall, Paata Tsikurishvili

The Department of Drama offers the B.A., an M.A. Program in Theater History and Criticism, an M.A. Program in Theater Education and M.F.A. programs in acting, directing and playwriting. For a packet of detailed information on the graduate programs, contact the Office of Graduate Admissions.

M.F.A. Programs

The graduate theater programs at The Catholic University of America are designed on the premise that theater is a fundamental cultural necessity. Theater is enriched by, and enriches, the community in which it is located. We believe that theater is a common ground for cultural discourse and that it is incumbent upon theater artists to use their voices responsibly. We strive to understand why theater is an essential art, asking what we can achieve in theater that cannot be achieved in other art forms. We challenge ourselves to recognize that by its nature performance is an innately spiritual act. We offer the training and experiences necessary for students to develop an imaginative creative process and disciplined personal expression in the theater. All of our endeavors are informed by a thorough knowledge of theater history and theory along with a critical understanding of the world canon of drama. We engage professional artists from the local, national and international theater community to support our mission and aid our students as they transition into the field.

Our programs entail the following: Acting-71 course credit hours for actors, with 2 practicum credits; Directing- 71 credit hours and 2 practicum credits; Playwriting-60 credit hours plus 4 practicum credits. There is no tuition charge for practicum credit hours. Normally, students should enter the program in the first, or fall, semester.

In the first two years, students are expected to enroll full time, with actors and directors taking 15 credit hours minimum each semester and playwrights taking 12 hours each semester. Students should expect to devote full time to the program, which entails rehearsal preparations for studio courses, readings and written work for critical studies courses, and practicum work.

In the third year, acting, directing and playwriting students enroll in five to seven credit hours each semester (paying part-time tuition), depending on their tracks. M.F.A. students satisfy the comprehensive examination requirements by essays on questions from the faculty related to their projects in their final year. All students are expected to make their work in their program courses, practicums and department productions their first priorities. Outside professional theater work by students while enrolled must be approved in advance by the student's program director(s) and by the department chair.

Acting

The M.F.A. Acting Program is designed to coincide with the three-year directing and playwriting tracks. The M.F.A. actors work sequentially through levels of studio courses designed to develop their imaginative and intellectual performance abilities and skills.

First year courses focus on the actor's self awareness-on the actor's instrument and tools: the body and voice, the senses and feelings, strengthening their confidence of impulse, sense of play and exploring personal resources through various acting approaches. Special attention is given to improvisation and contemporary material.

In the second year courses actors concentrate on "character"-the process of transformation and performing with progressive emphasis on creating a world from classical and modern texts. Particular focus is put on the discovery of the play's action, character development, stage combat, language demands and analysis of more complex literary material from classic and experimental origins.

Actors are required to audition for and play as cast in all department productions and are required to earn  one crew credit.

Third-year M.F.A. actors focus on living playwrights, dialects, a monograph performance, auditioning, theater as a business and professional jobs and/or internships. Third-year actors will be eligible to audition for professional opportunities in the D.C. theater community depending on university casting and/or assistantships. Actors prepare scenes and monologues for their final graduate acting project, a New York and/or Washington, D.C. showcase that helps them transition into their professional careers.

Directing

The M.F.A. Directing Program admits two talented individuals once every three years. Applicants should demonstrate that they have a passionate commitment to the art of directing and an ability to take risk. They must also have the potential to be artists and leaders who want to take their place as professionals on a national and even international level. Students admitted into the program will complete a concentrated course of study designed to identify and develop their own directorial vision. Throughout their courses and production work, the directing students will be encouraged to relentlessly ask the hard questions of themselves and their collaborators and to take responsibility for the philosophical, social, and political reverberations of their work. Although a collaborative approach is emphasized within an interdisciplinary context, the student is immersed in a wide variety of genres and styles with the goal of developing their own distinct and unique voice.

Both practical and theoretical, the program investigates all aspects of the art from the student’s first creative impulse to the polishing of a finished theatrical work. Practically, they will engage in a myriad of techniques including imagination-building, text-analysis, staging, leadership skills, developing criteria for choice as they direct a series of projects in a series of venues, culminating in a Thesis Production presented as part of the University’s main stage season. Theoretically, they will study the foremost practitioners of the art, develop critical skills as well as investigate the source of the art itself. Through this two-fold approach the directors will begin to forge their own methodology and shape their own aesthetic.

Over the course of their studies, the M.F.A. directors will be challenged to evolve their dramatic imaginations. They will explore the role of the director as interpreter and auteur. They will learn about style, develop the ability to work with classical texts, engage in new play development and adaptation, explore movement-based work, and explore design. They will develop leadership and management skills and hone their ability to articulate their unique vision. Throughout, they will take classes side by side with actors, playwrights, and dramaturgs, forming relationships that will last through their professional lives.

In their first year, the M.F.A. directors focus on naturalism and realism, concentrating on the development of the art form through the work of its seminal directors and theorists from Stanislavsky to Kantor. They will direct a series of realistic scenes that culminate with the presentation of a one-act play in the realistic tradition. In their second year, the M.F.A. directors will focus on the art of directing classical and heightened text, working with playwrights on developing and adapting new work, and incorporating elements of design into their vision. The Fall Semester will culminate in an adaptation project with one of the M.F.A. playwrights, and in the spring they will present a full work of classical text with some design support.

In the third year, as the students begin to transition into professional theater, they study contemporary theater practice, as well as devised and post-modern work. They are expected to also successfully complete an internship with an active performing arts organization, assisting master artists on production. They will also present a fully mounted Thesis Production of a play that they select with the input of the faculty and presented as part of the main stage season.

The directing program works to situate the directing students in internships on the local, national, and international level during their course of study in order to aid their transition into the profession upon their graduation. The program includes Master classes and seminars with nationally prominent theater directors. The M.F.A. directors also have the opportunity to visit rehearsals in the Washington, D.C. area and observe the work of professional theater artists. Both in the classroom and without, these M.F.A directors will engage in vigorous dialog, preparing them to take their places as professional working artists within the American theater.

Playwriting

In the M.F.A. Playwriting Program, student writers collaborate with student actors, directors, and dramaturgs in developing new works in rehearsal processes, and have opportunities to develop new works outside of these processes. They consider a variety of dramaturgical techniques for the development of action, character, language and structure. Student playwrights are encouraged to explore work that expands the boundaries of the theater event. In creative collaboration with student actors and directors, they shape and reshape some of their works in readings and workshops.

In their second and third years, M.F.A. playwrights are introduced to the work of adaptation and to the various professional venues for writers. They explore more fully the issues of rehearsal collaborations and continue to develop work on their own. Over the three years, students are expected to have completed at least four texts suitable for public presentation, one of which is to be an adaptation of nondramatic material.

M.A. Programs

Theater History and Criticism

The Program in Theater History and Criticism leading to the M.A. prepares students to enter the field of advanced theater studies and work as scholars, teachers, and dramaturgs. The M.A. requires the satisfactory completion of 30 credit hours and two crew credits. The course requirements for the M.A. degree are: 601 and 606; three other critical studies courses; three electives; and two research seminars, such as DR 983 and 984, or a thesis. Students are not required to complete a thesis in order to earn the M.A. degree. To complete a thesis an M.A. student must take two semesters of Thesis Guidance (DR 696). This option is only recommended to those students continuing their graduate studies in a Ph.D. program in theater history.

Note: completing the thesis uses two of the 10 courses in the program. Other seminars may be available in this or other departments. Course choices are determined in consultation with the program director and in consideration of the student's background and objectives. Students will be encouraged to serve as dramaturgs on department productions or on other performance projects with students in the M.F.A. programs; one of these experiences may serve as one of the two crew credits. The time and sequence of course offerings are such that students should plan to take two classes for four semesters and two courses over one or two summer sessions; this sequence allows a student to complete the degree within two academic years. Up to six hours of graduate work at another accredited institution may be applied toward the M.A.; these credits can be transferred once the student has completed successfully one full-time semester (or its equivalent) at CUA. Students take a comprehensive examination at the end of the program, usually in the semester in which they are completing their final course requirements. The examination has a written and an oral component.

The two crew credits are earned by satisfactory completion of production crew assignments; there is no tuition charge for them. One crew credit can be earned through dramaturgical work. Students must complete these to be admitted to comprehensive examinations. Crew credits are awarded when the Head of Production and the student's adviser agree that the student's work was satisfactory.

M.A. students are required to demonstrate a reading knowledge of a modern language, usually French or German, although others may be approved. This must be done before the student can sit for comprehensive examinations. Reading proficiency can be demonstrated by passing the Graduate School Foreign Language Test or by satisfactory completion of a noncredit intensive language course at CUA. The student whose native language is not English shall be considered to have fulfilled the language requirement without examination if his/her native language has demonstrable value for theater research. (For further information, see the section on language under General Requirements for Graduate Study, in these Announcements.)

Theater Education

The Program in Theater Education prepares students, teachers, and teaching artists to use the creative and instructional skills of the theater in the classroom, in productions at elementary and secondary schools, and in community programs. The M.A.T.E. includes two tracks: Creative Teaching Through Drama Track and Theatre Educator Track. The two tracks use distinct curricula and allow students to concentrate one or more of the following areas:

1. Developing practical skills for the creation and production of plays and teaching of theater in K-12 schools and community programs.

2. Advancing the skills of the theater artist as a writer, dramaturg and collaborator working with diverse populations.

3. Using the techniques of dramatists (actors, directors, designers, playwrights) to enhance the learning process across the curriculum and in different educational settings.

4. Creating a more complex understanding of how the dramatic arts can impact the curriculum in K-12 schools and the community as a whole.

The M.A. in Theater Education requires the satisfactory completion of 33 credit hours and passing a comprehensive exam. The head of the program and the student's adviser determine course choices in consultation with each student, keeping in mind his or her background and objectives. Each student must have a total of 30 credit hours of approved coursework and complete a 3 credit supervised project (DR 951). To earn an M.A. in Theater Education, students must successfully complete eight courses in the drama department and two courses in the Department of Education. The M.A. Program in Theater Education is structured to allow teachers and artists to complete the degree in four semesters and two summer sessions at CUA, followed by one semester of supervised work (DR 951). M.A. students who work or teach full-time can take one course each semester during the academic year. Each course will meet for one night a week. Students may elect to enroll in more than one course each semester and complete the program sooner. Students may add courses each semester to complete a Graduate Teacher Certification Program through the Education Department.

Continuation/Dismissal Policy

The full faculty regularly assesses the semester-by-semester progress of each student and makes determinations about continuation, based on academic and/or professional criteria defined as follows:

Academic Standard The full faculty may recommend the withdrawal or dismissal of students who receive grades of below B- in three courses. The courses include the work in studio courses, practicums and critical studies.

Professional Standards The full faculty evaluates each student's attendance to and completion of work on a consistent basis, which raises the craft and trade of the theater to the dignity of a learned profession. Continuation in the program is never guaranteed at any time.

Applications

Full instructions for applying to the graduate programs can be found on the drama Web site: http://drama.cua.edu, Graduate Programs, How to Apply. Applicants ordinarily should present an undergraduate major in drama or a related field, plus supporting materials as specified below. Students with other majors who have had some successful theater coursework (academic or performance) or production experience are welcome to apply.

All applicants for graduate programs, M.A. and M.F.A., must present an official undergraduate transcript; scores of the Graduate Record Examination-taken within the last five years; at least two letters of recommendation testifying to the student's academic and creative potential for graduate work; and résumés of acting, directing or other theater experience. Reference letters should testify to the applicant's potential for, and probable commitment to, the chosen program.

The department strongly encourages, in addition, the submission of a formal writing sample (such as an academic paper) by applicants for all programs, most especially applicants who believe their academic potential may not be fully represented by transcripts or GRE scores. Applicants for the acting and directing tracks of the M.F.A. program must audition. Writers must present manuscripts of plays, and applicants for the M.A. program must submit an example of their writing concerning literature, history or performance. Interviews are strongly recommended for anyone interested in the M.F.A. Playwriting Program and M.A. programs. Applicants will be contacted by the department to make arrangements for their audition. Application materials and an application fee of $60 should be sent to the Office of Graduate Admissions, The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 20064.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester. 

DR Course Title
500 Performance
505 Acting III
507 Drama Beyond the Theater
509 Drama in Education
514 Stagecraft
524 Actg/Directg Wkshop
526 Teaching Theater
540 Scene Design
541 Scene Painting
542 Design Applications
543 Stage Lighting
545 Production Design and Management
549 Intro to Costume Design
565 Playwriting I
566 Screenwriting
570 Theater Internship
572 Ireland in Early Mod Imagination
576 From Shakespeare to Sheridan
594 Independent Study
601 Intro to Theater Research
603 Western Theater & Culture I
604 Dramatic Structures
605 Modern European Drama
606 Theater Theory
608 Western Theater & Culture II
610

Twentieth Century Theaters

629 Integrated Movement
630 Graduate Acting I
631 Graduate Acting II
632 Alexander Technique
633 Alexander Technique II
634 Forms of Movement I
635 Forms of Movement II
636 Forms of Movement III
637 Forms of Movement IV
638 Performance Studio I
639 Performance Studio II
644 Design Conversations
650 Elements of Directing III
651 Elements of Directing I
652 Elements of Directing II
660 Playwriting Strategies
661 Writing in the Profession
670 Portfolio Evaluation
730 Graduate Acting II
731 Graduate Acting IV
733 Voice I
734 Voice II
739 Performance Studio III
750 Elements of Directing IV
762 Adaptation
830 Acting Internship
831 Master Class I
832 Master Class II
833 Voice III
834 Voice IV
835 Forms of Movement V
836 Forms of Movement VI
839 Performance Studio IV
950 Directing Thesis Guidance Workshop
595 Internship
860 Playwriting Internship
930 Acting Internship
937 Audition Workshop
939 Performance Studio V
940 Voice V
941 Voice VI
950 Seminar: Directing
951 Supervised Theater Education Project
960 Seminar: Playwriting
961 Playwriting Seminar
983 Seminar: Dramaturgy I
984 Seminar: Shakespeare In Theater
987 Research Internship
988 Seminar: Dramaturgy II
592 Directed Readings
692 Directed Readings
696 Master's Thesis Guidance
996 Master's Thesis: Playwriting
997 Master's Thesis Guidance: Directing
698A Master's Comprehensive with Classes
698B Master's Comprehensive without Classes

 

Program in Early Christian Studies

 

THE PROGRAM IN EARLY
CHRISTIAN STUDIES
 
Program Director: Philip Rousseau
Andrew W. Mellon Distinguished Professor of Early Christian Studies
 
The Catholic University of America has a unique heritage in the study of the early Christian era. Founded as a graduate institution in 1887, the university has from its earliest years fostered research and teaching in the formative period of Christian history, which is now studied in the School of Theology and Religious Studies, the School of Philosophy, and the School of Arts and Sciences (in the Departments of Greek and Latin, History, and Semitic Languages and Literatures). The university's John K. Mullen of Denver Memorial Library has concentrated library development in the Christian period before A.D. 800, especially in history, philosophy, theology, and canon and civil law. Its special collections in patristics were developed under the direction of the distinguished patrologist Johannes Quasten. The Institute of Christian Oriental Research, founded by the late Monsignor Henri Hyvernat, is a world-renowned depository for rare books and manuscripts pertaining to the study of Coptic, Syriac, Arabic, Hebrew, Armenian, and Georgian, and to their Near East literary traditions and historical contexts.
 
General
 
The program provides a carefully integrated course of studies in the early Christian period, drawing upon graduate courses available in the various departments and schools of the university. There is a strong emphasis on equipping students with the languages and technical skills necessary for their programs of study. Before being accepted into the program, students are expected to have completed graded college courses in ancient languages - in one of them (preferably Greek) to intermediate level. Progress in languages both ancient and modern is regularly monitored.
 
M.A. Degree in Early Christian Studies
 
To gain the M.A. degree, students must complete 30 semester hours of study. These must include the course "Introduction to Early Christian Studies" (when offered) and nine other graduate courses, which must be drawn from at least two schools or departments, involve the use of at least two relevant ancient languages, and represent at least two academic disciplines. Students must prove their competence in one foreign language relevant to current scholarship in the field. Finally, students must complete two substantial research papers and take a comprehensive written examination based on an official reading list - an examination that will include sight translations from two ancient languages.
 
Ph.D. Degree in Early Christian Studies
 
To gain the Ph.D. degree, students must have completed the M.A. in Early Christian Studies, or have an equivalent master's degree approved by the director. They then complete a further 30 semester hours of study, and write a dissertation. The courses chosen must be drawn from at least two schools or departments, involve the use of at least two relevant ancient languages, and represent at least two academic disciplines. Students must prove their competence in two foreign languages relevant to current scholarship in the field. Before embarking on their dissertations, students must take a comprehensive written examination based on a substantial reading list approved by the director - an examination that will include sight translations from Greek and one other approved ancient language.
 
A fuller description of requirements is posted on the program website: http://earlychristianity.cua.edu

Department of Education

 

Department of Education

Professors

John J. Convey, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Chair; Shavaun Wall, Euphemia Lofton Haynes Chair

 

Professor Emeritus

Sarah M. Pickert

Associate Professors

Agnes Cave; Rona Frederick; Merylann J. Schuttloffel, Chair

Associate Professor for Professional Practice

Joan Thompson

Assistant Professors

Kathryn E. Gadacz Bojczyk; Heather Rogers Haverback; Elizabeth Montanaro; Kathleen Perencevich;

 

 

Research Associate Professor

Carole William Brown

Research Assistant Professor

Leonard DeFiore, Brother Patrick Ellis Chair

Director of Teacher Education

Agnes Cave

Acting Director of Secondary Education

Liliana Maggioni

Director of Field Experiences

Elsie Neely

Visiting Scholar

Angela McRae

The Department of Education, a scholarly community of faculty and students, shares in the mission of The Catholic University of America. Through instruction, research and service, the department aims to contribute to knowledge and practice in education and to articulate the educational mission of the Catholic Church.

To this end, the department aims to develop scholarship, leadership, research capacities and practical skills that contribute to the growth and development of the field of education. By providing quality programs with common historical, philosophical, psychological, sociological and research foundations, the department prepares graduates to contribute to the academic, personal and social development of students. Graduates of doctoral programs are expected to be competent scholars and researchers who are able to provide leadership in practical settings. Graduates of master degree programs are expected to be skilled practitioners who are knowledgeable about the research and current developments in their area of specialization.

The department supports research on issues critical to the field of education, particularly those involving knowledge of the learner, the teaching-learning process, and instructional settings and the role of cultural and religious diversity within the educational enterprise. The department attempts to maintain a balance between basic and applied research, using both quantitative and qualitative methods, and strives to strengthen its research capacities among both faculty and students.

The department provides a variety of services to local, national, and Church organizations. In response to its surroundings, the department has a special goal of offering services to the urban public and Catholic schools in the surrounding community. Faculties serve as a professional resource to these organizations.

As part of a Catholic institution of higher learning, the department aims to provide national leadership in the areas of Catholic schooling and research. The department does this by educating those who will serve as Catholic educators; by offering in -service and pre-service development for teachers, administrators, counselors and others who work in Catholic schools or diocesan central offices; by providing a comprehensive model program for improving education; and by promoting research that focuses on schools.

Endowed Chairs in the Department

St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Chair

The International Federation of Catholic Alumnae and other contributors have established a chair in honor of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. The chair supports an outstanding scholar within the Department of Education to give greater focus on Christian values in Catholic schools and on the integration of these values in the contemporary curricula.

Euphemia Lofton Haynes Chair

A trust fund established by Euphemia Lofton Haynes, an African-American CUA alumna and prominent Washington-area educator, supports this chair. It is dedicated to enriching programs within the Department of Education.

Brother Patrick Ellis Chair

The Board of Trustees of the university established this chair in honor of Brother Patrick Ellis, F.S.C., former president and alumnus of the university. The chair is established to enhance the Department of Education's programs in leadership development for Catholic education.

Admission Requirements:

Master's Applicants

Applicants seeking admission to one of the master's degree programs must meet the following admission requirements:

1. An application indicating a desire to pursue a master's degree in education and specifying the specialty the applicant wishes to pursue.

2. Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate work. Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 2.75 in their undergraduate studies. In addition, secondary English, social studies, and math applicants must have a 3.0 GPA in the last 60 credits of their undergraduate studies. All applicants for graduate studies must have a minimum of 3.0 in their previous graduate work if applicable.

3. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) Aptitude (verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing) score or a Miller Analogies Test (MAT) score. (Contact the appropriate program coordinator and the Education website for additional program requirements).

4. Three strongly supportive letters of recommendation, at least one of which should be from a person familiar with the applicant's academic production; others may be from an immediate supervisor or other familiar with the applicant's professional work.

5. Applicant's statement of goals that demonstrates motivation, is well written, and gives evidence that the applicant's goals fit with Department programs.

6. An admission interview with members of the faculty, as required by the specialty.

Graduate Teacher Certificate Program Applicants

Applicants seeking admission to the Graduate Teacher Certificate Program (GTCP) in Secondary Education, Special Education or Early Childhood Special Education must meet the following admissions requirements:

1. An application indicating a desire to pursue a GTCP and specifying the specialty the applicant wishes to pursue.

2. Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate work. Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 2.75 in their undergraduate studies. In addition, secondary English, social studies, and math applicants must have a 3.0 GPA in their last 60 credits of their undergraduate studies. All applicants for graduate studies must have a minimum of 3.0 in their previous graduate work if applicable.

3. Praxis I or alternative scores as required by the District of Columbia for licensure.

4. Three strongly supportive letters of recommendation, at least one of which should be from a person familiar with the applicant's academic production; others may be from an immediate supervisor or others familiar with the applicant's professional work.

5. Applicant's statement of goals that demonstrates motivation, is well written, and gives evidence that the applicant's goals fit with Department programs.

6. An admission interview with members of the faculty, as required by the specialty.

Exceptions for Secondary Education, Special Education, or Early Childhood Special Education Master's Degree Applications from Students Previously Admitted to the GTCP at CUA

Secondary Education, Special Education, and Early Childhood Special Education applicants, who have been admitted to pursue the GTCP at Catholic University, after having completed 5 or more GTCP courses at Catholic University, may apply for admission to the master's degree program under the following conditions:

1. File an application indicating that they wish to change from the GTCP to a degree seeking program in Education.

2. Seek a review of their transcripts to demonstrate that they have received no grade below a "B" in any course taken as part of their GTCP.

3. Request a waiver of the requirement to submit either GRE scores or an MAT score.

4. Provide recommendations from two Catholic University, Department of Education faculty members familiar with the applicant's academic work.

5. Provide a statement of goals with reasons for now wanting to pursue a master's degree.

6. Present themselves for an interview with members of the faculty, if requested to do so.

Catholic Educational Leadership Doctor of Philosophy Applicants:

Catholic Educational Leadership and Policy Study (CELPS)

Applicants seeking admission to CELPS must meet the following admission requirements:

1. Submit an application indicating an interest in being admitted to either the doctoral program or the advanced graduate certificate program in Catholic Education Leadership.

2. Candidates seeking admission to the doctoral program or the advanced graduate certificate in Catholic Education Leadership (CELPS) should possess a master's degree from an accredited institution in educational leadership or a related field and submit for review and evaluation GRE or MAT scores and official transcripts of all previous academic work.

3. Submit three strongly supportive letters of recommendation, at least one of which should be from a person familiar with the applicant's academic production and ability to do doctoral work; others may be from an immediate supervisor or others familiar with the applicant's professional work.

4. Submit a statement of goals that demonstrates motivation, is well written, and fits with Department's programs. This detailed statement will indicate specifically why the applicant is seeking the degree and what areas of research they would like to explore in more depth. This statement should also include any information from the applicant's background that will help the admissions committee evaluate the applicant's potential for advanced graduate study.

5. In addition, an interview is required with the program director or designee.

6. For candidates with at least ten years of documented administrative experience as a diocesan official (e.g., superintendent, associate superintendent, school principal) or comparable administrative role, GRE and MAT scores may be waived and, upon review and approval by the Program's Coordinator, up to 24 graduate credits from an accredited institution may be transferred regardless of the date the credits were earned.

International Applicants

International applicants seeking admission to one of the Department of Education's graduate programs must meet the following admission requirements:

1. An application indicating a desire to pursue a doctoral degree or a Master’s degree in Education and specifying the specialty the applicant wishes to pursue.

2. Official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate work. Applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 2.75 (on a 4-point scale) in their undergraduate studies. In addition, secondary English, social studies, and math applicants must have a 3.0 GPA in the last 60 credits of their undergraduate studies. All applicants for graduate studies must have a minimum of 3.0 in their previous graduate work if applicable

3. All international students must submit TOEFL scores that meet University standards.

4. Grades and letters of recommendation must be submitted, but no predefined criteria will be specified, given the variety of practices abroad.

5. Graduate Record Examination Aptitude (verbal, quantitative and analytical writing) scores are required with obtained scores appropriate for the degree program for which the applicant is applying.

6. A statement of goals appropriate for the degree being pursued (Master’s or Doctorate) as indicated above.

7. Telephone or Skype interviews may be substituted for any required interviews for applicants living abroad.

Financial Aid

The university's Office of Financial Aid offers a number of financial packages. Interested applicants are urged to contact that office directly for information about these packages. The deadline for application is Feb. 1. The phone number for the Office of Financial Aid is 202-319-5307. The School of Arts and Sciences also offers full- and half-tuition scholarships for students of exceptional academic quality. These scholarships are administered through the department. Applicants to the Department of Education who plan to attend full-time and wish to be considered for a full-tuition, merit-based University Scholarship must submit GRE test score results. Students interested in these awards should contact the chair of the department. The deadline for applications for merit-based University Scholarship awards is Feb. 1.

Additionally, the department has a limited number of financial aid awards for graduate students. These awards are in the form of teaching assistantships or research assistantships, and each includes a stipend plus partial or full tuition remission. Applicants for teaching or research assistantships may submit either MAT or GRE scores as part of their application. These awards are made as funds are available and do not have a fixed deadline for application.

Catholic School Educators Scholarships

Half-tuition scholarships for Catholic school educators are available to any administrator, teacher, guidance counselor, special educator or librarian who is currently employed in a Catholic preschool, elementary school or secondary school, and who intends to continue working in a Catholic school setting. They may be used by doctoral, or master's students in any school of the university except the Columbus School of Law.

Better Teaching Project Scholarships

The university offers a special tuition to all applicants who are accepted to the Early Childhood Special Education Program. In addition, selected applicants may be awarded additional funds from a U.S. Department of Education grant to equal full tuition. A service obligation is associated with receipt of the federal grant funds.

Federal Family Education Loan Program and the William D. Ford Direct Loan Program

For student loan information please refer to the following links:

Stafford Loan Forgiveness Program for Teachers

http://studentaid.ed.gov/PORTALSWebApp/students/english/cancelstaff.jsp?tab=repaying/

Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF)

http://studentaid.ed.gov/PORTALSWebApp/students/english/PSF.jsp

 

Degree Programs and Requirements

The department offers a wide variety of graduate opportunities for individuals interested in professional education. Broadly speaking, two types of programs are available. Non-degree programs are offered for educators seeking licensure in secondary education, special education, and early childhood special education. Additionally, the department offers a series of professional development workshops and institutes for practicing educators interested in updating and improving their professional skills and obtaining credit toward recertification.

Degree programs in education are offered at the Master of Arts (M.A.), and the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) levels. At the M.A. level, five specialty areas are available:

· M.A. in Secondary Education (English, Math, or Social Studies);

· M.A. in Special Education;

· M.A. in Early Childhood Special Education

· MA in Literacy, Language and Technology (No applications to this program accepted for 2013-2014.)

· MA in Catholic School Leadership (Only offered through archdiocesan cohorts)

 

Any graduate student who obtains two or more grades of C in coursework in his or her graduate program is subject to academic dismissal. For any graduate student in the teacher education program, no course with a grade below C will be counted toward certification.

If a graduate student has taken a required course and received a grade of F, the student must repeat the course to earn a grade of B- or higher. A student may choose to repeat a course in an effort to earn a better grade regardless of the initial grade received. In both cases, the following rules apply:

· The student may repeat the course only once.

· Whether higher or lower, the later grade will be used in computing the grade point average.

· The student will only receive credit for taking the course once.

Continuous enrollment is required of all students in degree and certificate programs unless an authorized academic leave has been granted. Failure to maintain continuous enrollment or to obtain an official academic leave is considered to be evidence that the student has withdrawn from the university.

Master of Arts Degree

The M.A. program consists of a minimum of 30 semester hours of post-baccalaureate coursework, the option of completing two research papers or a master's thesis, and comprehensive examinations. All M.A. students are required to complete nine hours of study in general education courses (i.e., core requirement). The remainder of the coursework (i.e., 21 to 42 hours) is completed in one of the three specialty areas. With additional coursework, professional certification is available in teacher education, specifically through the secondary education and special education programs and the early childhood special education program.

Students who select the option of working toward professional certification will spend more than the 30-hour minimum completing coursework.

CUA's Educator Preparation Program (EPP) has been accredited by the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) (formerly known as the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education [NCATE]) since 1975, and the EPP’s teacher education programs are state approved

Core Requirement

The core course requirement comprises three 3-credit courses in general education. Successful completion of the following courses is mandatory for fulfilling this requirement:

EDUC 525

Psychology of Learning for Diverse Populations

EDUC 699

Introduction to Educational Research

EDUC 702

Advanced Foundations of Education

Transfer credit for the above courses is not usually allowed. Note, however, university policy permits the transfer of up to six semester credit hours of previous graduate work into the M.A. program with the approval of the student's academic adviser. In addition, the Department of Education normally will consider for transfer only credits earned in the five-year period immediately preceding the student's admission to the university, and for which the student earned a grade of B or better.

Other Requirements

In addition to the core courses, students must satisfy three additional requirements. First, students complete a Program of Studies in their specialty area. A Program of Studies is a projection of the student's series of courses. It must be approved by the student's academic adviser and the department chair, and it must be filed in the student's departmental records before the end of the first year of study. Approval of a projected program does not obligate the university to offer all the courses listed.

Research Papers:

Requirements: MA students in Education are required to prepare two major Research papers. One Research MA paper will be written in EDUC 699: Introduction to Educational Research; a scholarly comprehensive literature review. The second research MA paper will be written in EDUC 702: Advanced Foundations of Education; a research paper that integrates an approved historical topic and philosophical analysis. Each paper must be at least 20 pages in length and include at least 20 scholarly references. The professor of record for the course will grade the research MA papers. Students must receive a grade of B or better in order for the paper to count as the research MA paper. Students who receive a grade lower than B on the paper have the option of working with the professor of the course to improve the paper to meet the requirements of a research paper. Such students must complete with the course professor a contract that specifies the steps and deadlines in revising the paper, with the final revision submitted for approval no later than the mid-term of the following semester. Completed research papers must be approved by the course instructor and by the Department Chair. They indicate their approval by signing the “Research MA Paper Form, which includes an abstract of the paper.

Comprehensive Exam: Action Research Paper

Requirements: MA students will write an Action Research Paper (ARP) during the student’s final teaching experience while enrolled in a field experience course. Criteria include a clear statement of educational philosophy, use of pretest data to document the problem under study, use of the reflective framework to examine dilemmas related to teaching strategies, use of scholarly literature to explore appropriate interventions, implementation of an intervention, use of posttest data to document the effect of the intervention on student learning, and personal reflection about the processes involved with transforming one’s teaching. This paper must be 20-40 pages in length and include at least 20 scholarly references. The faculty who supervises the student during the field experience course will evaluate the paper using the ARP Comprehensive Exam Scoring Rubric. The student’s average score must “meet expectations.” If the university supervisor is not a faculty member, a faculty member will be assigned as a co-reader to evaluate the ARP. Completed ARP papers must be approved by the assigned faculty member and by the Department Chair. They indicate their approval by signing the “Comprehensive Exam Action Research Paper Form”, which includes an abstract of the paper. Papers must be submitted to the department before the graduation deadline date in order to graduate in the same semester.

Electronic submission will occur as required by the program for the research papers and Action Research Paper (ARP) comprehensive exam.

This policy is effective beginning in Fall 2011. Students who have already matriculated have the option to follow the current policy guidelines on MA comprehensive exams and research papers.

Students should register for Comprehnsive exam:

EDUC 698A Masters's Comprehensive exam w/classes

EDUC 698B Master's Comprehensive exam w/no classes

Graduate Teacher Certification Program (Non-degree)

A Graduate Teacher Certification Program (GTCP) is available in secondary education, special education, and early childhood special education. Admission into the GTCP requires a bachelor's degree and passing scores on the PRAXIS I (reading, writing and math tests) or other scores as required by the District of Columbia for licensure but does not require scores on either the GRE or MAT. The GTCP coursework is similar to the coursework required for the M.A. in teacher education, with the exception that GTCP students do not take EDUC 699: Introduction to Educational Research or EDUC 702: Advanced Foundations of Education, nor do they have to take comprehensive examinations.Students are not required to complete research papers in EDUC 702 and EDUC 699; yet, they are required to complete an Action Research Project (ARP) during their student teaching experience..

The Secondary Education GTCP is offered in the following subject matters: English, Social Studies, and Math.

Through a transcript review, applicants must demonstrate successful completion of 30-36 credit hours of coursework in one or more subject areas. Subject requirements must be completed prior to student teaching. The Secondary Education GTCP consists of 15 credit hours of coursework plus 12 credit hours for student teaching together with a student teaching seminar.Applicants who are teaching full-time in the area of specialization may be eligible to substitute enrollment in a 4-credit student teaching experience together with a student teaching seminar. GTCP candidates must take the PRAXIS II Subject Assessment Test in the subject of interest before student teaching and pass the PRAXIS II Subject Assessment Test and PRAXIS II Principles of Learning and Teaching Test in order to obtain the license in the subject of interest.Contact Dr. Liliana Maggioni, the program coordinator, for more information on the Secondary Education GTCP by email: maggioni@cua.edu.

The GTCP in special education consists of 30 credit hours, assuming certain prerequisites have been met. GTCP candidates must pass the PRAXIS II: Core Knowledge of Special Education as well as the Principles of Learning and Teaching pedagogy test in the age group they are planning to teach . Contact Drs. Elizabeth Montanaro (montanaroe@cua.edu) or Tom Long (long@cua.edu) program coordinators, for more information on the Special Education Graduate Teacher Certification Program.

The GTCP of Early Childhood Special Education usually consists of 30 hours. Contact Dr. Carole Williams Brown (brownc@cua.edu), for more information on the Early Childhood Special Education Graduate Teacher Certification Program.

Specialty Areas of Study for the M.A. Degree

Teacher Education with Licensure in Secondary Education. This specialty offers students the professional education coursework needed for state licensure in secondary education. The program prepares teachers to work with diverse, adolescent learners and focuses on learning theory and teaching methodology; instructional design and the use of assessments; and classroom management. Incorporated into the M.A. program are opportunities to reflect on practice through directed field experiences. The Secondary Education sequence prepares middle school and high school teachers (7th-12th grade) in the following subject areas: English, Mathematics, and Social Studies. Through transcript review, applicants must demonstrate successful completion of 30-36 credit hours of coursework in one or more subject areas. Subject requirements must be completed prior to student teaching. The M.A. program in Secondary Education is a 42 credit hour program that includes a semester of full-time teaching in a secondary school setting (12 credits). MA candidates must take the PRAXIS II Subject Assessment Test in the subject of interest before student teaching and pass the PRAXIS II Subject Assessment Test and PRAXIS II Principles of Learning and Teaching Test in order to obtain the license in the subject of interest. Applicants who are teaching full-time in the area of specialization may be eligible to substitute enrollment in a 4-credit teaching seminar for student teaching. Course requirements include those listed under Core Requirements, plus the following:

EDUC 581

Educating Diverse Learners

EDUC 582

Reading in the Content Areas: Learning to Learn from Text

EDUC 586

Curriculum and Methods in Adolescents Education

EDUC 765

Principles of Curriculum

EDUC 574

Methods (in English, Social Studies, or Math Education)

EDUC 597

Student Teaching and Seminar: Secondary Education

 

Two additional electives (3 credits each) in Education or

in the content area.

Teacher Education with Licensure in Special Education. This specialty prepares K-12 non-categorical special education teachers. It specifically focuses on special education teachers who will work with children with high incidence disabilities in inclusive settings. The special education certificate program offers coursework needed for state licensure in the District of Columbia as a K-12 non-categorical special educator. Applicants are expected to have completed coursework in normal human growth and development, as well as classroom management, before beginning the M.A. program. Such coursework is available for those candidates who may not have previously taken these courses. 30 -36 credits are required for the degree. A minimum of 30 graduate credits is applicable in two situations: for students receiving approval for transfer of up to six credits earned at another graduate institution, and for graduates of CUA's B.A. program who completed up to six credits of prior certification coursework at the 500 level, e.g. EDUC 581 or EDUC 522, with a grade of B or better.

This master's degree program and the Graduate Teacher Certificate Program include three field experiences necessary to acquaint students with best practices in special education. Because of the extent of the field-based practice incorporated into this program, students must be available to pursue coursework full time during summers but may take courses part-time during the regular academic semesters. Students should be able to complete the entire degree sequence in two years, even while holding a full-time teaching post, as long as they are able to attend classes during summers. Course requirements include those listed under Core Requirements, plus the following:

EDUC 522

Race, Class, Gender and Disability in Education

EDUC 531

Language and Literacy Development of Children with Disabilities

EDUC 532

Practicum in Modification and Adaptation of Curriculum and Instruction for Exceptional Children

EDUC 533

Field Experience in Assessment

EDUC 534

Field Experience: Collaboration, Consultation and Systems Changes

EDUC 535

Current Trends in Ethical and Legal Issues in Special Education

EDUC 536

Interpersonal Communication, Consultation and the Process of Change

EDUC 581

Educating Diverse Learners

EDUC 635

Psychological Measurement

Also the following if the student has not previously completed this coursework:

EDUC 553

Understanding Learning Disabilities

EDUC 555

Classroom Management for Regular and Special Needs Children

EDUC 639

Human Growth and Development

Teacher Education with Dual Licensure in Early Childhood Education and Early Childhood Special Education. CUA’s program in Early Childhood Special Education offers graduate students the opportunity to complete a dual licensure program of Early Childhood and Early Childhood Special Education through its Graduate Teacher Certification Program (GTCP) or the Master of Arts degree. It prepares post-baccalaureate candidates to become reflective practitioners able to work in early childhood settings within public, private, and parochial schools and acquire the knowledge, attitudes, and skills to provide infants and young children with exceptional needs the learning tools necessary to succeed in a diverse and changing society. The program’s approach fosters in students the skills and expertise to work collaboratively in a variety of programs including Head Start, early intervention, public charter schools, and preschools that are part of a network of early childhood settings, private and/or publicly subsidized. CUA’s program has a strong emphasis on cross-cultural sensitivities and backgrounds, especially bilingual language development and bilingual school settings. By completing several observations and three field placements, students develop extensive knowledge of assessment, instructional practice, consultation, collaboration, and action research in their own work settings and through placements selected to complement the students’ prior experiences: for example, in Early Head Start and/ Universal preschool programs, private preschool and kindergarten, bilingual classrooms in public charter schools, as well as preschool and elementary settings from DC Public Schools.

The certification professional sequence in Early Childhood Special Education is comprised of 30 semester hours of credit for the GTCP (and equivalent courses within the certification professional portion of the MA sequence), an Action Research Project and the Praxis II examinations in the core knowledge of early childhood, special education, and elementary education. A course in classroom management is a prerequisite. Applicants who have not satisfied these prerequisites prior to admission must do so before applying for licensure.

The program’s developmental and academic content divides the traditional semester of student teaching into three field experiences. Course requirements include the 9-credit core for the MA degree or EDUC 525 for the GTCP, plus the following:

EDUC 639

Human Growth and Development

EDUC 581

Educating Diverse Learners

EDUC 531

Language and Literacy Development of Children with Disabilities

EDUC 532

Practicum in Modification and Adaptation of Curriculum and Instruction of the

Exceptional Individual

EDUC 572

Language and Cultural Issues in Bilingual Education

EDUC 635

Psychological Measurement

EDUC 533

Field Experience in Assessment

EDUC 575

Supervised Internship: Early Childhood Field Experience

EDUC 573

Family Support Using a Strengths-Based Model

GTCP students of Early Childhood Special Education take 30 credit hours from the ECSE course sequence, excluding EDUC 699 and EDUC 702. 30 -36 credits are required for the MA degree. 24 -30 credits are required for the GTCP. A minimum number of graduate credits is applicable for the MA or the GTCP in two situations: for students receiving approval for transfer of up to six credits earned at another graduate institution, and for graduates of CUA's B.A. program who completed up to six credits of prior certification coursework at the 500 level with a grade of B or better.

Upon completion of the program, CUA graduate teacher education candidates may obtain licenses in additional subject matters from DCPS by passing the PRAXIS II content and pedagogy tests in the relevant areas of interest.

Master of Arts in Literacy, Language and Technology (No applications to this program will be accepted for 2013-2014.)

The M.A. in Literacy, Language and Technology will prepare professionals to develop a strong foundation in reading, writing, and language development and to implement instructional strategies that incorporate technology-rich tools and culturally and linguistically responsive practices in order to enhance literacy development. Our program emphasizes practices and processes known to be effective for culturally and linguistically diverse populations. All coursework embeds 21st century technology-rich applications centering on literacy materials, instruction and assessment. Course of Study for MA in Literacy, Language, and Technology

General CORE: (9 credits)

EDUC 525

Psychology of Learning for Diverse Populations

EDUC 699

Introduction to Educational Research

EDUC 702

Advanced Foundations of Education

Literacy CORE: (21 credits)

EDUC 602

Psychology of Reading

EDUC 531

Literacy Instruction and Engagement for Diverse Readers

EDUC 668

Literacy Assessment: Diagnosis, Evaluation and Remediation

EDUC 670

Processes of Language Development and Literacy Acquisition

EDUC 530

Learning from Text: Literacy Materials for Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Contexts-Elementary focus OR

EDUC 582

Learning from Text: Literacy Materials for Linguistically and Culturally Diverse Contexts; Reading in the Content Areas –Secondary focus

EDUC 601

Critical Literacy in the Digital Classroom

EDUC ***

Digital and Media Literacy

   

For Licensure as a Reading Specialist, 2 additional courses are required:

Supervised Clinical Practicum Experiences (6 credits)

EDUC 603

Literacy Clinical Field Experience

EDUC 604

Seminar and Practicum in Leadership and the Role of the Literacy

Catholic School Leadership

The Catholic School Leadership program is designed to prepare practitioners to assume administrative positions specifically in Catholic elementary and secondary schools. This program is offered in collaboration with the Archdiocese of Washington through a cohort model. The sequence of courses provides exposure to theory, research and practice in education integrated with a Catholic educational philosophy.

EDUC 615

Governance and Community Relations

EDUC 704

History, Mission and Practice of Catholic Education

EDUC 751(a)

Building a Faith Community

EDUC 720

Emerging Leadership Theory

EDUC 723

Personnel Administration in Education

EDUC 724

Education Supervision

EDUC 729

Administrative Internship

Advanced Graduate Certificate in Catholic Diocesan Leadership

The Department of Education offers the Advanced Graduate Certificate Program in Catholic Diocesan Leadership for students who already hold a master's degree. The Advanced Graduate Certificate Program requires students to complete 19 credits in Catholic education content courses and Catholic Educational Leadership and Policy Studies specialty courses. An additional six hours of coursework in Catholic Educational Leadership and Policy Studies is required for those candidates who hold an M.A. in a different content area. This program is intended for Catholic school teachers or principals who have an M.A. and seek preparation for diocesan leadership. The program is tailored to meet a student's past academic history and future employment plans. The certificate program offers summer classroom instruction over two consecutive summers with a field experience during the intervening year.

In addition to the academic aspects of the programs, opportunities will be provided both for individual spiritual growth and community building with cohort members. Cohort members will have the opportunity to interact with key Church leaders in the metropolitan region. Access to the national Catholic organizations and strategic relationships with these groups allows faculty to engage students in the highest level of interaction with Catholic educational leaders while on campus. When students return to their home diocese, networking and mentoring contacts will be available to further assist them as they transition to new leadership roles.

CELPS Doctor of Philosophy Degree

The department offers the Catholic Educational Leadership and Policy Studies Doctoral Program CELPS, under a nontraditional format that includes three intensive summer sessions of prescribed coursework and intervening assignments in the field.The intention of the program is to prepare leaders who will continue to transform Catholic Educational practice at all levels with current professional research while at the same time infusing Catholic tradition and values into their vision and practice.

All Catholic Educational Leadership and Policy Studies students must take the following or substituted courses as necessary to meet requirements:

Catholic Education Core

EDUC 704

History, Mission and Practice of Catholic Education

EDUC 707

Contemporary Issues in Catholic Education

EDUC 713B

Administration of Catholic School System

EDUC 715

Building a Faith Community

EDUC 860

Seminar-Research on Catholic Schools

Research Core

EDUC 633

Introduction to Statistics

EDUC 637

Curriculum and Program Evaluation

EDUC 733

Experimental Design

EDUC 792

Qualitative Methods in Education Research

EDUC 828

Administrative & Organizational Behavior

Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

EDUC 615

Governance and Community Relations

EDUC 712

Fiscal Issues and Policy in Education

EDUC 720

Emerging Leadership Theory

EDUC 724

Educational Supervision

EDUC 729

Administrative Internship

EDUC 751

Lyceum (1 credit)


Other Requirements

CELPS doctoral students must satisfy three requirements. First, students complete a Program of Studies as prescribed by the program director. A Program of Studies is a projection of the student's series of courses and it must be filed in the student's departmental records before the end of the first summer of study. Approval of a projected program does not obligate the university to offer all the courses listed.

The second requirement is the successful completion of a written comprehensive examination. This exam is typically taken during the fourth summer following the completion of coursework.

students register for EDUC 998A Doctoral Comprehensive w/classes

                               EDUC 998B Doctoral Comprehensive w/out classes

Third, students are required to complete and defend a written dissertation. The dissertation is viewed as a major research project and is expected to be of publishable quality. The approval process for a dissertation topic is described in the university's Dissertation Handbook. See also The Doctoral Degree in the General Information section of these Announcements for more detail regarding the dissertation.

Resources and Facilities Center for the Advancement of Catholic Education

This center brings together scholars and practitioners to identify major challenges facing Catholic education in the 21st century and to explore practical solutions to these problems. To achieve this goal, the center has three major functions. The center's first function is to establish a systematic national data collection on Catholic schools that will serve bishops, pastors, school officials, researchers and policy makers. The second major function of the center is to provide planning services to meet the needs of dioceses and individual Catholic schools as a continuation of assistance provided by The Catholic University of America since the early 1980s. The center's third major function is outreach. The outreach function focuses on providing a service to dioceses or individual schools in three areas:

1. Developing Catholic leadership and collaborating with Catholic school leaders at various levels to explore practical solutions to the challenges facing Catholic education;

2. Designing programs to educate children with special needs in Catholic schools; and

3. Strategizing ways to provide quality Catholic education for minority children, especially those in urban Catholic schools.

Professional Development Workshops and Institutes

The Professional Development Workshops and Institutes are designed to bring together administrators, teachers and counselors to explore current educational challenges and issues from a multidisciplinary perspective. Through a series of intense short-term workshops and institutes, each focused on a specific topic or issue, participants will be able to gain the theoretical and applied knowledge necessary to expand their areas of certification or to recertify. The workshops and institutes are offered in the fall, spring and summer.

Other Information

Transfer of Credit In addition to the university's regulations for the transfer of graduate work earned at another institution (see General Information section), the Department of Education normally will consider for transfer only credits earned in the five-year period immediately preceding the student's admission to the school and courses in which students attained a B or better.

Advisers Each student in the Department of Education is assigned a faculty adviser prior to initial registration. It is anticipated that the student will take responsibility for making an appointment to meet with the faculty adviser at an early date. The adviser assumes the role of providing guidance regarding study and degree requirements, counsel for academic problems that may arise during the student's course of study and a continuing resource for the student.

At the doctoral level, students work directly under the guidance of a faculty mentor. Doctoral students will be matched with mentors upon admission. This decision is based primarily on the mutual research interests of the students and prospective mentors. Students are encouraged to familiarize themselves with faculty research interests at time of application.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's website at http://enrollmentservices.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

 

Department of English Language and Literature

Professors Glen M. Johnson; Virgil Nemoianu, William J. Byron, S.J. Professor of Literature; Ernest Suarez, Chair; Christopher J. Wheatley; Stephen K. Wright
Professor Emeritus Joseph M. Sendry
Associate Professors Tobias Gregory, Director of Graduate Studies; Lilla Kopar; Michael Mack; Rosemary Winslow
Assistant Professors Gregory Baker; Daniel Gibbons, Director of Undergraduate Studies; Rebecca Rainof Mas
Clinical Assistant Professors Todd Lidh; Taryn Okuma; Pamela S. Ward, Director of  Writing and Rhetoric
Lecturer Anca M. Nemoianu

The Department of English offers the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in English and American literature. Further information is available on the departmental Web site: http://english.cua.edu/

Applying for Admission

Prospective students may apply online at http://admissions.cua.edu. In addition to the completed application form and fee, graduate applications should include a personal statement detailing plans for graduate study, official transcripts from all previous institutions of higher learning, GRE scores, three letters of recommendation, and a writing sample of 15-20 pages of critical prose, preferably in the applicant's prospective field of specialization.  The M.A. and Ph.D programs in English accept applications for the fall semester. The deadline for funding consideration is February 1; applicants seeking funding should ensure that all their application materials have been received by the Office of Graduate Admissions by that date. For logistical or technical questions on the application process, contact the CUA Office of Graduate Admissions at 1-800-673-2772 or 202-319-5057. For academic questions, contact Prof. Tobias Gregory at gregoryt@cua.edu.

M.A. in English Language and Literature

The M.A. in English is conferred upon completion of 30 credit hours of course work (normally ten courses), of which up to six credits may be transferred with the approval of the graduate director, and a comprehensive exam. Degree requirements are as follows: 

  • ENG 721 (Introduction to the Profession of Letters), to  be taken at the student's first opportunity
  • ENG 702 (Modern Trends in Criticism), to  be taken at the student's first opportunity
  • One research seminar (800-level course)
  • Reading knowledge of at least one foreign language, which may be demonstrated through course work or by a proficiency exam.

The M.A. comprehensive exam consists of two parts: history of literature in English to 1800, and history of literature in English since 1800.

Ph.D. in English Language and Literature

The Ph.D. in English is conferred upon completion of 54 credit hours of course work following the B.A., a comprehensive exam, and a dissertation.  Up to 24 credits may be transferred with the approval of the graduate director.  Degree requirements include those for the MA (see above) with the following additions: 

  • Two research seminars (800-level courses) after completion of the M.A.
  • Reading knowledge of a second foreign language, which may be demonstrated through course work or by a proficiency exam

Upon completion of course work the Ph.D. student takes a comprehensive exam consisting of three parts: literature of an historical period; literary theory and the history of criticism; and an individualized field in which the dissertation is to be written. 

As the culmination of their academic training, doctoral students write a dissertation representing a substantial piece of original research.  The student begins by submitting a proposal outlining the project to the department for approval. Students are expected to submit the dissertation proposal to the department within six months of successfully completing the Ph.D. comprehensive exam. The dissertation normally takes two to three years to complete.

With the approval of the graduate director, graduate students in English are welcome to take pertinent courses in other departments for degree credit. Courses taken to fulfill the language requirement do not also count for degree credit.

Students who receive two grades of C or below are subject to dismissal from the program.

Financial Support

Financial support for graduate students in English includes scholarships and teaching assistantships. Outstanding students entering the department's programs are also eligible for university-wide tuition scholarships. A number of graduate teaching assistantships become available each year within the department. These are awarded on a competitive basis. Teaching assistantships provide a full waiver of tuition and a cash stipend, in return for teaching six hours of lower-division English per semester or equivalent duties.  Provided that all materials are received by February 1 (see application procedures, above) all applicants will be considered for any available scholarships and assistantships for which they qualify.

Rhetoric Certificate

The Department of English offers a certificate of rhetoric granted upon completion of four courses in the field, as approved by the graduate director. Notation that the certificate has been earned will appear on the student's transcript. Students may count rhetoric courses taken to gain the certificate in the total number required for the degree. Advisor: Stephen McKenna.

Joint M.A. (English)-M.S. in L.S. Program

The Department of Library and Information Science and the Department of English offer a joint-degree program that enables students to have careers as editors in publishing, humanities librarians or antiquarian booksellers. The program requires 54 semester hours, 30 hours in library science and 24 in English. Applicants for joint degrees must submit complete and separate applications to both degree-granting units of the university. Joint degrees are conferred simultaneously after all requirements for both degrees have been met.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

ENG Course Title
501 Introduction to Old English I
502 Introduction to Old English II
503 Beowulf
520 American Political Rhetoric
524 The Rhetoric of Advertising
526 Workshop-Writing Improvement
530 The Rhetoric of Propaganda
532 Visual Rhetoric
541 Irish Women Writers
565 Renaissance Drama
570 Seminar-Contemporary Irish Society
572 Restoration & 18th Century Drama
573 Irish Drama-17th & 18th Century
580 Irish Lit Tradition (Dublin)
583 The Modern Irish Short Story
585 Women in Modern Irish Literature
586 Irish Poetry After Yeats
587 Modern Irish Drama
588 Contemporary Irish Drama
589 American Tradition in Poetry
592 Modern American Drama
594 Independent Study
694 Independent Study
599 Northern Ireland-Conflict & Culture
621 History of English Language
625 General Linguistics
626 Contemporary English Grammar
635 History of Rhetoric-Greek-Medieval
636 History of Rhetoric II-Late Middle Ages
637 Special Topics in Rhetoric
641 Old English Literature I
642 Old English Literature II
643 Intro to Old Norse-Icelandic
649 Readings in Old Norse
656 Alliterative Poetry-14th Century
662 Spenser
664 Milton
672 Restoration Literature
674 The Novel from Defoe to Austen
676 18th Century English Poetry & Criticism
678 Scott and the Historical Novel
681 Readings in Romantic Verse
683 Major Victorian Poets
684 Aestheticism & Decadence
685 Victorian Novel
688 American Realism and its European Background
690 Nineteenth Century American Fiction
691 The Modern British Novel
694 Topics Irish Literary Renaissance
696 British Poetry-Eliot & Auden
698A/B MA Comprehensive Examination (A: with classes, or B: without classes)
699 Postmodern Novel
700 Practicum-Teaching Comp
715 Literary Criticism & Religion
718 Constructing Literary Fields
720 Literary Theory & Composition
721 Introduction to the Profession of Letters
723 Approaches to Teaching Rhetoric & Composition
725 Readings in Medieval English Literature
726 Readings in Renaissance English Literature
727 Readings English Literature Rest. 18th Century
728 Readings in English Literature 1798-1914
729 Readings in American Literature
741 Seminar in Stylistics
743 Texts in Context Anglo-Saxon Poetry and Culture
744 Literature and Religion in Early Modern England
753 Chaucer-Troilus & Other Poems
754 Chaucer-The Canterbury Tales
757 Medieval English Drama
834 Seminar-Renaissance Epic
847 Seminar-Rhetoric of Narrative
851 Seminar-Medieval Literature
852 Seminar-Narrative Middles: The Novel and Development
856 Seminar-Realism/Modern American Drama
861 Seminar-Renaissance Lyric
865 Seminar-The Pastoral Tradition
871 Seminar in Swift
873 Seminar in Samuel Johnson
875 Seminar in Austen
877 Seminar-American Renaissance
879 Seminar-W. Whitman & E. Dickinson
886 Seminar-"Apocalypse" 19th-20th Century English Literature
887 Seminar-American Poetry Mid-20th Century
889 Seminar-Shakespeare
891 Seminar in Yeats
892 Seminar in Joyce
893 Seminar-Waugh & Mod Eng Novel
895 Seminar-Modern American Poetry
896 Seminar-Faulkner and Warren
897 Seminar-Contemporary Southern Poetry
899 Seminar-20th Century American Drama
996 Dissertation: Doctoral
998A/B Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (A: with classes, or B: without classes)

 

Department of Greek and Latin

Professors Frank A.C. Mantello; William E. Klingshirn, Chair
Associate Professors William J. McCarthy; John F. Petruccione; Sarah Brown Ferrario
Web site http://greeklatin.cua.edu

The Department of Greek and Latin offers three graduate degree programs, leading to the M.A. degree in Greek and Latin, the M.A. degree in Latin, and the Ph.D. degree in Greek and Latin, and three graduate certificate programs, in Greek, in Latin, and in Greek and Latin. Detailed information about all these programs is available at the department's website.

Programs at the master's level emphasize the study of Classical Greek and/or Latin literature, but may also include approved coursework in history, art and architecture, patristics, postclassical Greek and Latin, epigraphy, papyrology, paleography and other disciplines. Neither M.A. program requires a thesis, but degree candidates must submit two substantial research papers for review by a committee of the faculty. In the doctoral program there is a special emphasis on the late antique period and on postclassical Greek and Latin, and a requirement that Ph.D. dissertations focus on a patristic, late antique, or Medieval Latin topic.

This emphasis at the doctoral level reflects the department's reputation as a center for the study of Christian Greek and Latin, which is exemplified by two series of published dissertations it has sponsored-Patristic Studies and Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Latin Language and Literature-and by The Fathers of the Church, a well-known series of English translations published by The Catholic University of America Press and long associated with this department. This unique heritage in the study of late antiquity and the medieval period, which is shared by other departments and programs at the university, has also been responsible for the development of a number of projects undertaken by the university press, notably Studies in Christian Antiquity; Medieval Latin: An Introduction and Bibliographical Guide; and the Catalogus translationum et commentariorum, a series devoted to the medieval and Renaissance Latin translations of ancient Greek authors and the Latin commentaries on ancient Greek and Latin authors up to the year 1600. The most recent initiative is The Library of Early Christianity, a new series of texts and facing-page translations, whose editorial director is a member of the department's faculty.

The department's certificate programs (in Greek, in Latin, and in Greek and Latin) are special graduate qualifications available to post-baccalaureate, graduate, or continuing-education students. They provide concentrated and carefully supervised opportunities, unencumbered by the usual obligations of traditional degree programs, to receive intensive instruction in classical and/or postclassical Greek and Latin and to acquire the linguistic skills required for advanced studies and research in Classics and a wide variety of fields in the humanities. Admission is open to applicants with a completed bachelor's degree (in any field), and there is no need to submit GRE scores or to have had any prior experience in Greek or Latin. Each certificate program consists of 15 credit-hours (five courses) of language study at the advanced level and can be completed in less than one calendar year if a student enters with intermediate-level language work already completed. Those without this linguistic background can satisfy prerequisites (elementary and/or intermediate language courses) during the summer before the selected certificate program begins.

The university's John K. Mullen of Denver Memorial Library houses excellent resources for graduate students, including medieval and Renaissance manuscripts and diplomata and 10,000 volumes from the renowned Clementine Library, assembled by Gian Francesco Albani (Pope Clement XI, 1700-1721) and his family. The department also maintains a working library of its own on permanent reserve, as well as a small collection of Greek and Roman antiquities. Teaching collections of Greek, Roman, and Byzantine coins are held in the University Archives. CUA's membership in the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area ensures that students may take courses for CUA credit at participating institutions and have access to their libraries. In accord with the terms of a special exchange agreement, master's and doctoral students may also be eligible to enroll for credit in courses offered by the Classics department of The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore.

 Students who wish to become candidates for the department's M.A. programs in Greek and Latin or in Latin should ordinarily have taken one or both of the classical languages as their programs of concentration in college or should have acquired equivalent training before beginning graduate work. Students wishing to be admitted as candidates for the Ph.D. degree should ordinarily have completed a B.A. or a master's degree program in classics (at CUA or elsewhere), and should be primarily interested in studying patristics, late antiquity, or Medieval Latin against the background of ancient Greek and Roman literature and culture. Deficiencies in training for graduate work, in either Greek or Latin, must be made up before students will be eligible for admission to courses conferring graduate credit. Transfer of graduate credits earned at other accredited institutions is permitted in accordance with the university's regulations. Graduate or Certificate students who receive a grade of C in any course are subject to review by the faculty of the department. Those who receive a grade of F or a second grade of C are subject to dismissal. Courses may be repeated only at the discretion of the chair.

Candidates for the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees must take written comprehensive examinations based upon departmental reading lists. A reading knowledge of French and German is strongly recommended from the beginning of graduate studies. Competence in either of these languages is required for the M.A. degrees in Greek and Latin and in Latin; documentatin of a reading knowledge of the other, and of any additional relevant languages, is required prior to the comprehensive examination for advancement to doctoral candidacy.

Program Semester Hours
M.A. in Greek and Latin  
GR 511: Greek Prose Composition 3
LAT 511: Latin Prose Composition 3
GR 655: Survey of Greek Literature 3
LAT 655: Survey of Latin Literature 3
Six other approved courses 18
Total 30
Modern language examination (French or German)  
Comprehensive examinations  
Submission of two approved research papers  
   
M.A. in Latin  
LAT 511: Latin Prose Composition 3
LAT 655: Survey of Latin Literature 3
Eight other approved courses 24
Total 30
Modern language examination (French or German)  
Comprehensive examinations  
Submission of two approved research papers  
   
Ph.D. in Greek and Latin  
M.A. degree program in Greek and Latin (or the equivalent) 30
CLAS 572: Mediterranean World of Late Antiquity 3
Three courses in Greek texts 9
Three courses in Latin texts 9
Three other approved courses 9
Total 60
Modern language examination (German or French and any other relevant languages)
Comprehensive examinations  
Doctoral dissertation  


Courses Offered

Please consult http://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

CLAS Course Title
521 Numismatic Workshop
531 The Teaching of the Classics
546 Augustan Rome
560 Greek Art and Architecture
561 Roman Art and Architecture
564-566 Topics in Ancient History/Culture
567 History of Ancient Mediterranean I
568 History of Ancient Mediterranean II
572 Mediterranean World of Late Antiquity
590 A World Filled with Gods: Pagan, Jewish, Christian and Muslim Art in Late Antiquity
592 Directed Reading - Masters
615 Masterpieces of Classical Literature
621 Gibbon's Decline and Fall
698A Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)
698B Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)
705 Seminar
706 Seminar
709 The Pagan Holy Man
GL Course Title
701 Introduction to Classical Studies
705 Patristic Seminar
706 Patristic Seminar
707 The Later Roman Empire
755 Greek and Latin Epigraphy
803 Comparative Greek and Latin Philology
GR Course Title
501 Elementary Greek for Graduate Students I
502 Elementary Greek for Graduate Students II
504 Readings in New Testament Greek
509 Intensive Elementary Greek
510 Readings in Greek Prose
511 Greek Prose Composition
512 Advanced Grammar and Prose Style
515 Greek Historiography
516 Intensive Intermediate Greek I
517 Intensive Intermediate Greek II
518 Greek Tragedy
519 Intensive Intermediate Greek
523 Homer
528 Greek Lyric
529 Greek Choral Lyric
532 Greek Comedy
534 Greek Historical Writing
535 Greek Epic
541 Introduction to Later Greek Language and Literature
548 Greek Pastoral
550 Stars, Fate, and the Soul
553 Greek Oratory
576 Greek Philosophical Works
581 The Greek Novel
587 The Athenian Empire
592 Directed Reading
603 Readings in New Testament Greek
611 Greek Epigraphy
613 Introduction to Greek Papyrology
655 Survey of Greek Literature
698A Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)
698B Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)
705 Patristic Seminar
706 Patristic Seminar
733 Greek Paleography
996 Doctoral Dissertation Guidance
998A Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)
998B Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)
LAT Course Title
501 Elementary Latin for Graduate Students I
501A Elementary Latin for Graduate Students I
501B Elementary Latin for Graduate Students I
502 Elementary Latin for Graduate Students II
502A Elementary Latin for Graduate Students II
502B Elementary Latin for Graduate Students II
505 Readings in Canonical Latin
505A Readings in Canonical Latin
505B Readings in Canonical Latin
509 Intensive Elementary Latin
510 Readings in Postclassical Latin
511 Latin Prose Composition
512 Advanced Grammar and Prose Style
515 Roman Historiography
516 Intensive Intermediate Latin I
517 Intensive Intermediate Latin II
519 Intensive Intermediate Latin
520 Roman Drama
524 Julius Caesar
526 The Epigrams of Martial
528 Roman Lyric
529 Roman Elegy
530 Ovid
531 Horace
533 Virgil's Eclogues and Georgics
534 Latin Paleography I
535 Latin Epic
548 Roman Pastoral
553 Roman Oratory
558 Roman Satire
559 Lucretius
561 Introduction to Medieval Latin Studies
562 Topics in Medieval Latin Studies
576 Roman Philosophical Works
579 Roman Epistolography
581 The Roman Novel
587 The Roman Revolution
588 The Age of Nero
589 Christian Church in the Roman Empire
592 Directed Reading
592R Directed Reading
607 Early Latin Hymnody
609 Gregory of Tours
641 Medieval Latin Seminar
642 Medieval Latin Seminar
655 Survey of Roman Literature
705 Patristic Seminar
706 Patristic Seminar
733 Latin Paleography I
734 Latin Paleography II
751 Diplomatics
792 Directed Reading
803 History of the Latin Language
833 Codicology
834 Textual Criticism
996 Doctoral Dissertation Guidance
998A Doctoral Comprehensive Examinations (w/Classes)
998B Doctoral Comprehensive Examinations (w/o Classes)

 

 

Department of History

Professors Katherine Ludwig Jansen; Nelson H. Minnich; Jerry Z. Muller, Chair; Lawrence R. Poos; Leslie Woodcock Tentler
Professors Emeriti Uta-Renate Blumenthal; Maxwell H. Bloomfield; Ronald S. Calinger; George T. Dennis; John E. Lynch; William A. Wallace
Associate Professors Thomas Cohen; Michael C. Kimmage; Arpad von Klimo; Laura E. Nym Mayhall; Timothy J. Meagher; Stephen A. West
Assistant Professors Jennifer R. Davis; Jason T. Sharples; Caroline R. Sherman; Lev Weitz; Julia G. Young

The department offers both an M.A. and a Ph.D. in history, as well as joint programs at the M.A. level with the Department of Library and Information Science and the Columbus School of Law. The joint M.A./M.S.L.S. and M.A./J.D. programs integrate history with professional training.

The focus at the M.A. level is on building a broad understanding of the historical development, critical historical issues, and research methodologies in one of four broad fields of history (Latin American, medieval, modern European or United States), or in the special field of Religion and Society in the Late Medieval and Early Modern World (1300-1800). Within these fields, no subfields are formally recognized. Thus, for example, while a student may have a strong interest in colonial United States history (1492-1783), the student must also take courses on the nineteenth and twentieth century United States (1783-1980) and will be expected to be conversant with the major issues of the entire period before completing the M.A. While it has special requirements (see below and consult the departmental website), the special field in Religion and Society in the Late Medieval and Early Modern World shares this characteristic.

At the Ph.D. level, the reverse expectations hold. A student works with faculty to develop three  narrow fields of specialization-one defined as a major field and two as minor fields. The emphasis in the major field is on the development of depth of understanding and preparation for the Ph.D. dissertation. Students must expect to work very closely with an individual faculty member and take courses that are closely focused.

Degree programs in history must be completed with a minimum grade point average of 3.0. A course in which the student has earned less than a B- does not count toward the credit requirements of the degree. It may be retaken once, at the discretion of the department chair. Any student incurring more than one grade below B- (F or C grades) may be dismissed.

Master of Arts

The M.A. requires completion of a minimum of 30 credit hours (10 courses) beyond the bachelor's degree. These courses must include HIST 601 and at least two research seminars (800-level courses or 900-level directed research). Students are free to choose (in consultation with their advisers) whether or not to write a thesis for the M.A. degree; those who choose the thesis option include six credit hours of thesis direction toward their minimum required credits.

Completion of the degree further requires satisfactory performance on a comprehensive examination in the student's chosen area of study (medieval or modern European, U.S., Latin American, or religion and society in the late medieval and early modern world). Every student must also satisfy a language requirement, to be completed prior to the taking of the comprehensive examination. For most areas of study this requires qualification in a minimum of one language, but for medieval European history, two (typically Latin plus one other). Satisfaction of the language requirement may be by any of the means outlined in the General Information section of these Announcements, and elementary language courses primarily concerned with grammar or reading comprehension do not count toward the minimum number of credit hours required for the degree. All M.A. students must also deposit copies of two research seminar papers with the department office. Students who choose the thesis option must register twice for thesis guidance and have the topic approved by the faculty and the dean. They will be awarded six hours of credit upon successful completion of the thesis.

M.A. Program in Religion and Society in the Late Medieval and Early Modern World

The department offers a special M.A. degree program in Religion and Society in the Late Medieval and Early Modern World. This program is designed for students who wish to study the historical dimensions of religion and religious experience in the period from the 14th to the 18th century in Western Europe and the Western Hemisphere. The requirements for this degree are essentially the same as for the regular M.A. degree except that students will concentrate their studies in a range of courses relevant to the program. The comprehensive examination will reflect the specific focus of this program.

Joint M.A. Programs

In addition to the regular M.A. program outlined above, the department cooperates with the Columbus School of Law and with the Department of Library and Information Science.

Admission to the law school is a prerequisite for the joint J.D.-M.A. program. Nine law credits can be applied toward the minimum of 30 credits required for the M.A. in History. Students fulfill all other requirements for the Master's degree: proficiency in a modern language, minimum G.P.A of 3.0, satisfactory performance on the comprehensive exam. For further information regarding this option, contact the department chair.

The joint program leading to an M.A. in history and an M.S. in library and information science requires a total of 51 credit hours (30 in library and information science and 21 in history). The history segment of the program requires that the student follow the nonthesis option and complete HIST 601, a minimum of two research seminars (800-level courses or 900-level directed research), and four more courses (readings courses or research seminars) in the student's chosen area of history. Nine credits are transferred from the M.S. in library and information science program to complete the degree. The student must also satisfy the requirements for a comprehensive examination and languages described above. For information on the M.S. in library and information science requirements, consult the Department of Library and Information Science section of these Announcements.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Ph.D requires completion of a minimum of 54 credit hours (18 courses) beyond the bachelor's degree. At the end of the first semester of residency, a departmental committee reviews the grades and performance in the semester's courses and evaluates good progress. In the case of students entering the Ph.D. program with an M.A. degree already obtained from another institution, the department may transfer a maximum of 24 credit hours (eight courses) toward the minimum required for the Ph.D. The 54 credit hours must include HIST 601 (or its equivalent from another institution's graduate program) and a minimum of four research seminars (800-level courses or 900-level directed research). An M.A. thesis in history from another institution may take the place of two of these seminars.

Further, the Ph.D. requires satisfactory performance on comprehensive examinations in one major and two minor fields of historical study, which are defined through consultation with each student's adviser. Every student must also satisfy a language requirement prior to the taking of the comprehensive examinations: for most areas of study this requires qualification in a minimum of two languages, but for medieval European history, three (Latin plus two others). Satisfaction of the language requirement may be by any of the means outlined in the General Information section of these Announcements, and elementary language courses primarily concerned with grammar or reading comprehension do not count toward the minimum number of credit hours required for the degree. Finally, the Ph.D. requires completion of a dissertation under the direction of faculty advisers and the dissertation's satisfactory defense.

Every Ph.D. student's program of study is tailored to that student's particular fields of focus, which in turn are intended to relate to the nature of the eventual dissertation research. Students must thus work closely with their mentors, and student and mentor together must make every effort to define the comprehensive examination fields and the curriculum necessary to prepare for them as early as possible in the student's progress through the program. Within two semesters of entering the Ph.D. program, each student must have a colloquy--a formal meeting with the faculty members expected to participate in examinations in that student's major and minor fields, in order to define the nature of the fields and to specify remaining coursework necessary to prepare for each field. The report of the colloquy committee remains part of the student's departmental file as a guideline for completion of studies. One of the minor fields may be in a discipline entirely outside history (such as literature, political science, archaeology or anthropology, for example).

The department has a limited number of merit-based, tuition-remission scholarships, endowed stipends and stipendiary teaching assistantships to offer graduate students, and reviews the credentials of all applicants to identify potential candidates for such awards.

A more complete set of instructions regarding all aspects of the graduate degree programs may be obtained from the department's Web site.

 Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

HIST Course Title
520 Pagan & Christian Historians
529 19th & 20th Century Ireland
530 Seminar-Contemporary Irish Society
531 Renaissance
531A Renaissance Papacy
534 Modern Irish History
535 Public History
539 Witchcraft-Early Modern Europe & New England
540 Famine Irish Immigrants
549 Humanism to Enlightenment
550 Reformation
560 Era of Civil War & Reconstruction
551 Nationalism & Conse. in 20th Century
552 Modern European Intellectual History
568 History of European Cooperation (Leuven)
569 Europe-Cultural Entity (Leuven)
570 Latin America-20th Century Revolutions
571 Latin America-Culture & Politics
572 Church-Colonial Latin America
574 Missionary Church, 1500-1800
576 Fashion and Society since 1500
585 Religion & Society in 19th & 20th Century
592 Directed Reading
593 Directed Research
594 Independent Study
595 Internship
601 Historical Analysis & Methodology
603 Historical Teaching
604 Historical Teaching
605 Late Antiquity to Early Byzant
607 Women, Sex, & Gender-Middle Ages
608 Anglo-Saxon England
609 Medieval Civilization I
610 Medieval Civilization II
611 Medieval Monarchy
612 Medieval France
613 The Reformation
613A

Catholic Reformation (1302-1540)

613B Council of Trent
614 The Renaissance
615 The Crusades
616 Church & Monarchy-Medieval European Inve.
617B Boethius, Then and Later
618 Greek Paleography
619 Readings on the Old South
620 Mediterranean World-Late Antiquity
621 Introduction to Byzantine History
622 Topics in Medieval History
623 Early Modern France
624 Comparative Fascism
625 Modern Germany
628 Enlightenment Science & Culture
629 Topics in Cold War History
629A Cold War in Europe and the United States
630 Scientific Revolution
631 State & Society-Early Modern Europe
632 Tudor/Stuart England
633 Modern Science & Medicine
634 Modern Ireland
635 European Culture & Society, 1450-1800
635A Reform & Society in the Long Sixteenth Century
636 Britain's Empire
636A Comparative Theories of Empire
637 Politics & Society-20th Century U.S
640 Later Medieval England
641 Modern European Intellectual History I
642 Modern European Intellectual History II
643 Medieval Monasticism
644 Topics in Modern Britain
645 Power Patronage & Propaganda
647 Religious Interpretation & Cultural Criticism
648 Women & Gender in Modern Europe
649 Citizenship in Britain
650 Race & American Society-1607 to Present
651 Race, Culture & Politics in 20th Century U.S.
652 Gender & Sexuality-North America & Europe
654 Religion & Society in Early America
656 Topics-Colonial Society & Thought
657 Political Culture-Revolutionary America
660 Era of Civil War & Reconstruction
661 Readings-American Religious History
662 The Gilded Age
663 Immigration & Ethnicity in America 1840-1970
664 American Cultural History 1877-1929
670 Slavery in America
671 Readings in Colonial Soc History
672 Readings in Atlantic History
673 The Irish in America
674 Old Regime & French Revolution
675 Revolutionary America 1740-1820
676 History of the New South 1865-1919
677 Gender in American History
678 Byzantine History Writers
679 Medieval Hagiography
680 American Catholic Experience-1789-1970
680A Readings on Later Medieval Italy
681 Politics & Religion-Early Modern Europe
682 Shaping Population-Europe & U.S.
683 Investiture Controversy
684 Religion & Culture in Latin America
684A The Iberian World, 1500-1800
685 Religion & Society-19th & 20th Century L
686 Modern Mexico
687 Latin America-Colonial Institutions
688 Race & Family Class in Latin America
689 Cultural Frontier-Mexico-U.S-SW, 1850-1930
690 Intellectual History of Latin American 19th-20th Century
692 Readings-Later Medieval Italy
694 The Iberian World, 1500-1800
694B Historiography of Medieval Islam
695 Latin America-20th Century Revolutions
696 Thesis - Masters
697 Portugal & Brazil, 1415-1806
698A Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/ Classes)
698B Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)
792 Directed Reading
793 Directed Research
794 Independent Study
795 Internship
798 Student/Faculty Research
803 Seminar-Pope Gregory VII
806 Seminar-Investiture Controversy
807 Seminar-Crusaders & Colonies
808 Carolingian France
809 Seminar-Early Medieval History
810 Seminar-Later Medieval History
811 Seminar-Medieval France
812 Seminar-Medieval English Society & Economics
813 Seminar-English Law & Society 1250-1600
814 Seminar-Medieval Heresy & Dissent
815 Seminar-Medieval Law
816 Seminar-Geographical Methods
817 Council of Trent
819 Seminar-Byzantium and the West
820 Colonies & Empires
821 Post-war American Conservatism
824 Ascetic Imperative (Medieval)
825 Seminar-Byzantine Ethics, 800-1300
826 Media & Society in Early Modern Europe
832 Seminar-Renaissance & Reformation
833 Issues in Renaissance Religion
833A Renaissance Papacy
839 Early Modern European Society
840 Seminar-Modern German History
841 Great Works in Modern Social Thought
842 Capitalism In Mod Euro Thought
843 The Medieval Monarchy
846 Politics & Culture-Modern Britain
848 Imperial Austria 1740-1850
851 Seminar-North Atlantic World
856 Seminar-Colonial Society & Thought
857 Citizenship & Identity in North America
860A Seminar-19th Century United States
861 Seminar-Civil War & Reconstruction
870 Modern American History
879 War & Society-America 1880-1945
885 Latin America-Society & Culture
996 Dissertation-Doctoral
998A Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/ Classes)
998B Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

 

Program in Irish Studies

Program Director: Christopher J. Wheatley

PLEASE NOTE: Admissions to this program have been suspended until further notice

The Program in Irish Studies is administered by an interdepartmental committee representing the departments of English, history, modern languages and politics. Instituted in 1991, the program is part of a tradition of academic commitment to Irish studies at CUA, dating from the endowment of a chair in Celtic Languages and Literatures by the Ancient Order of Hibernians in 1896. Instruction in the Irish or Gaelic language has continued in the century since, complemented by courses in Anglo-Irish literature and, from 1982, by the Program in Irish Society and Politics. The Dublin Parliamentary Internship is now administered by the Office of Global Education. The John K. Mullen of Denver Memorial Library maintains strong collections in support of coursework and research in these areas, with particularly distinctive holdings in Gaelic and Anglo-Irish literature and Irish history. The University Archives, furthermore, contain a wealth of materials from Irish republican organizations of the 19th and early 20th centuries, and others pertaining to Irish-American religious and labor history and Irish immigration.

M.A. Degree in Irish Studies

This is an interdisciplinary degree, coursework for which is intended to demonstrate the relationships among Irish literary culture (in both Irish and English), history and politics. Accordingly, of the 30 credits necessary for the degree, 24 are taken in required courses distributed as described below. While there is no prescribed sequence of courses, degree candidates are required to take part for one semester in the Program in Irish Society and Politics, offered in Dublin under CUA auspices through the Institute of Public Administration. This involves a semester-long internship working as a research assistant to a member of the Irish parliament, together with courses in Irish history, politics and literature, offering a total of 15 credits. The remaining 15 credits can be taken at CUA, with provision for a limited transfer of applicable credits from other institutions.

The degree program concludes with a comprehensive examination given over two days: the first day will be devoted to Irish studies in general, the second to a special area chosen by the student with the approval of the student's academic adviser. The academic methods in which students are trained provide a background for further graduate work as desired, in Celtic studies, economics, English, history, international relations, law or political science. Two grades of C or lower can result in dismissal from the program. Students may repeat a course in which they achieve a grade lower than C only at the discretion of the program director. Students may resit comprehensive examinations once with the consent of the program director.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

IRST Course Title
535 Intro to Spoken Gaelic
536 Intro to Spoken Gaelic II
540 Famine Irish Immigrants
560 Conflict and Conciliation in
570 Seminar-Contemporary Irish Society
572 Ireland in Early Mod Imagination
573 Drama in Ireland-17th & 18th C
583 Modern Irish Short Story
585 Women in Modern Irish Lit
586 Irish Poetry after Yeats
587 Modern Irish Drama
588 Contemporary Irish Drama
595 Independent Study
599 Northern Ireland: Conflict/Cul
634 Modern Ireland
673 Irish in America
684 Aestheticism and Decadence
694 Topics Irish Literary Renaissance
891 Seminar in Yeats
892 Seminar in Joyce

Department of Library and Information Science

Faculty

Renate Chancellor, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Youngok Choi, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Ingrid Hsieh-Yee, Ph.D. Ordinary Professor
Sung Un Kim, Ph.D. Assistant Professor
Bill Kules, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Chair
David Shumaker, M.S. Clinical Associate Professor
Sue Yeon Syn, Ph.D. Assistant Professor
Jane Zhang, Ph.D. Assistant Professor

History

The Department of Library and Information Science was founded at The Catholic University of America in 1939 as the Department of Library Science in the School of Arts and Sciences. It has been accredited continuously by the American Library Association since 1948. The school library media program of study is accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education. In 1974, in recognition of the increasing importance of its role in information services, information science was incorporated into the name of the department.

 

Vision

LIS transforms the role of libraries and information in society globally and locally, through excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service by engaging with the rich resources of our region and beyond, for the betterment of humanity.

Mission

The Department of Library and information Science (LIS) provides professional education and supports lifelong learning in the tradition of The Catholic University of America. We produce innovative leaders with professional values informed by the CUA core values of reason, faith and service; and the LIS values of collaboration, community, innovation and excellence. Our education is characterized by a strong grounding in the theory and practice of the LIS field, engagement with the rich cultural and human resources of the Washington metropolitan area, and the creative use of information technology. LIS is committed to applying the principles of library and information science towards the betterment of the individual, communities and society.

Program Goals and Objectives

The LIS programs develop graduates who:

  • Are skilled in organizing, disseminating, managing and preserving information;
  • Are skilled in the use of information technologies and articulate the role of information technology in facilitating information management;
  • Demonstrate a commitment to the philosophy, principles and legal and ethical responsibilities of the field;
  • Are capable of serving information seekers in a global society;
  • Appreciate education and service as integral to the role of the information professional in society;
  • Interpret and apply research results from library and information science and related fields;
  • Articulate the economic, political, cultural, and social importance of the information profession;
  • Are dedicated to professional growth, continuous learning, and applying new knowledge to improve information systems and services to meet the needs of information users in society.

Application

The Admissions Committee reviews each applicant's entire record. The committee considers numeric scores, background, talent and other attributes that are needed by the information professions. Readiness to engage in academic work, analytic and conceptual thinking ability, strong writing skills and a commitment to the application of new techniques and concepts to the information professions are also considered.

These qualities are exemplified in the application process. See details in the Admissions page.

International Students

Library and Information Science requires that applicants from non-English-speaking nations whose previous education has not been at institutions of higher education in the United States certify their proficiency in English by submitting scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS). A minimum score on the TOEFL of 580 (paper-based test) or 237 (computer-based test) or 92 (Internet-based test) is expected. On the IELTS, an Overall Band score of 6.5 or higher is required.

A certified translated copy of your transcript is needed if it is not in the English language. 
All transcripts issued from outside the United States must be certified by a recognized evaluator of international educational records (such as WES or AACRAO), even if in the English language. Education completed at institutions outside of the United States, as shown by official documents, may be accepted as equivalent to educational experience in the United States.
For more information, including deadlines for international applicants, see CUA Admissions.

Application Deadlines

To ensure consideration, we recommend the following dates for applications:

April 1 Applicants for starting in Summer Sessions
July 15 Applicants for fall admission
Nov. 15 Applicants for spring admission

For the most current information on registering for visiting student status or for post-master's study, please call the School of Library and Information Science at 202-319-5085.

Financial Aid


University Financial Aid

While much financial aid available to students is administered by LIS (see Special Scholarships below), students should apply directly to the University Office of Financial Aid for loans to fund their education and for any need-based financial aid administered by the university (e.g., the campus work-study program) for which they might qualify. All documents intended to satisfy requirements for such financial aid should be sent directly to:

The Catholic University of America
Office of Financial Aid
Washington, D.C. 20064

202-319-5307

For more information see Financial Aid in these Announcements or call the financial aid office at 202-319-5307.

Special Scholarships

The chair nominates outstanding students for university scholarships as described earlier in these Announcements. Several one-half tuition scholarships are available for full-time for study in the degree programs of Library and Information Science. Students who want to be considered for university scholarships must submit the General Aptitude Test scores from the Graduate Record Exam even if the scores were not needed for admission.

Additional scholarships from endowments  are administered through the department. The Rovelstad Scholarship provides a year's tuition to a continuing part-time student who is, like most financial aid recipients, selected on the basis of merit. Other such scholarships typically are granted in amounts ranging from $200 to $1,000 as funds become available.

Financial support may be available on a short-term basis from a loan fund administered by the department.

An up-to-date compilation of sources of aid is available directly from SCOLE, American Library Association, 50 East Huron Street, Chicago, IL 60611. A limited number of loans are given each year by the local chapters of the Special Libraries Association and the District of Columbia Library Association and other professional groups. For information concerning the availability of scholarships and loans, contact the Office of the Associate Dean.

Graduate Library Professional Program and Scholarship

The Graduate Library Pre-Professional Program, administered by The Catholic University of America Libraries with the cooperation of the Department of Library and Information Science, provides selected students in the Library and Information Science program with pre-professional work experience in the University libraries. The GLP Program allows students to complete their degree requirements within a two-year period and combines full-time, salaried work with part-time study. Participants receive the Graduate Library Pre-Professional Scholarship, which provides six credit hours of tuition per semester. GLP openings in the DuFour Law Library Law Library (202-319-4331) and Mullen Library (202-319-5055) and instructions on how to apply are posted on their websites.

Special Tuition

Reduced tuition may be available through your employer. Please check Special Tuition Rates to see if your employer has an agreement with us entitling its employees to discounted tuition.

Degree Requirements

A total of 36 semester hours of graduate credit is required for receipt of the Master's of Science in Library and Information Science (MSLIS) degree, of which 30 semester hours must be taken in Library and Information Science at The Catholic University of America and completed with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B). Candidates for the MSLIS degree must also pass a comprehensive examination.

The university normally expects that requirements for master's degrees will be completed within three years. Students who do not complete their coursework within four years of enrolling in the program must petition the faculty in writing for an extension of time. Extending the completion of coursework beyond this point requires the approval of both the faculty and chair. 

Baseline Technical Requirements

Successful completion of the program requires competencies in basic computer applications, such as email, word processing, Internet use, and use of library systems. Students also need regular access to computer and Internet resources. There are lists of Essential and Important requirements to aid prospective and current students in assessing their needs. For students wishing to enhance their computing skills, we offer a series of free Saturday workshops every semester. They cover basic skills that are not taught in regular courses.  Workshop topics and schedules are updated each semester. CUA and LIS also offer computer lab facilities for student use. CUA computer labs are available across campus.  LIS maintains a computer lab as well as portable computers for students to check out. The Technology Inventory provides a detailed list of LIS resources.

Core Courses

All students are required to complete with a passing grade the following core courses: CLSC/LSC 551, 553, 555, and 557. These courses cover the central elements of the curriculum: acquisition and organization of information, retrieval and dissemination of information, technological applications, information sources and services, and the important policies, standards and ethical issues facing information professionals. A core course requirement may only be waived if the student has comparable transfer credit. Students are urged to complete the core courses within the first 18 semester hours of coursework.

Elective Courses

The school offers a rich array of specialized courses and joint-degree programs. Students will work with their academic advisers to design a sequence of courses appropriate to their professional objectives.

Comprehensive Examination

Candidates for the MSLIS degree must pass a comprehensive examination. Students may not register for this examination earlier than the final semester of coursework. Registration for the examination requires a minimum GPA (Grade Point Average) of 3.0 for courses taken in Library and Information Science, with no provisional reports of incomplete (I) remaining on the student's record. Comprehensive examination briefings and an explanation of procedures are held each semester.

The school sends written notification to students informing them of the results of the comprehensive examination. Those who fail must retake the entire examination in a subsequent term. Candidates who fail a second time are no longer eligible to receive a master's degree.

The comprehensive examination tests a common knowledge base that will qualify the candidate to perform professionally and provide a foundation for the individual to acquire greater expertise as needed. Questions from former semesters and more details are available on the school's Comprehensive Exams webpage.

Courses at Off-Campus Sites

Through an arrangement with the State Council of Higher Education for Virginia, Library and Information Science currently offers courses leading to the M.S.L.I.S. degree in various locations in Fairfax and Loudoun counties and in Richmond, Va.

The program also offers courses at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. These courses are open to non-employees of the Library of Congress on a space-available basis.

All students should expect to earn credits on the campus of The Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., as not all courses can be available at an off-site location. Information about off-campus programs and specific course offerings for a given semester is available from the school office and the Web site. In fall, spring and summer sessions, LIS usually offers two to four courses at each off-campus site. The school also offers a few online courses most semesters and a few hybrid courses in which online material substitutes for some class meetings.

Grading

Letter grades are given to students taking courses for credit unless these courses are graded "pass-fail." The quality of a student's performance in a particular course, including such factors as ability to meet deadlines and participation in class discussion, is the only basis for a grade. Faculty will provide feedback to students evaluating the performance on which a grade is based.

Students are cautioned that any grade below a full B (3.0) is considered marginal in Library and Information Science programs, and grades of C are viewed with grave concern. Students receiving two grades of C or a single grade of F will be dismissed from the program. Students receiving low grades should consult with instructors and advisers immediately about ways of improving their academic performance.

Students in Library and Information Science are expected to be aware of and adhere to the information in the General Section of the Graduate Announcements on Grades and Grade Reports (including Incompletes, Unethical Practices, Academic Honesty, Change of Grade, Dismissal) and Change of Enrollment (including academic leave, change of course, withdrawal from a course and withdrawal from the university).

Incompletes

A provisional report of I (incomplete) may be given to a student who, for legitimate reasons, has not completed course requirements, provided that work already completed is of passing quality and has submitted a Request for Incomplete form to the Dean's Office. Students receiving more than one incomplete may not take further coursework while more than one provisional report remains on their record.

Students granted provisional grades of I (incomplete) must complete all work and have permanent grades reported to the registrar by the midpoint of the next academic term (i.e., the midterm date specified in the registrar's academic calendar), whether the student is enrolled during that term or not. If by that date the incomplete (I) is not replaced by a passing grade, the grade of F (failure) will be recorded for the course. Any Request for an Extension of this deadline must be made in advance of the deadline and approved by the dean as well as by the instructor. Students are reminded that grades of F normally result in dismissal from the program.

Independent Study

Academic credit may be earned for concentrated study in a subject or problem to meet a student's special need or interest. Students enroll in a formal course  and work under the direction of a full-time faculty member. Arrangements must be made with the instructor well in advance of registration. Except in unusual circumstances, Independent Study should be taken in fall or spring semester, not in summer.

Practicum

Through its practicum, the department offers a unique opportunity to gain professional experience in one of the many libraries in the Washington metropolitan area. Students may earn three graduate credits by working 120 hours under the supervision of a professional librarian who is not their direct supervisor at their place of employment. Hours of the practicum may be arranged at the mutual convenience of the student and supervisor. A variety of public, academic, school and government libraries, as well as special libraries and archives, have served as practicum sites.

A student may usually take one practicum as part of the M.S. in L.I.S. program. All students who are planning to work as school media specialists must plan to take a practicum (LSC 695B) course. Further details about the practicum and a partial list of previous sites are available on the school's practicum web site or from the practicum coordinator.

Joint Degree Programs

Joint-degree programs provide students with opportunities to combine work in two disciplines in order to acquire competence in specialized areas of library and information science. In general, such programs allow students to obtain two graduate degrees sooner than they could acquire each independently. Applicants for joint degrees must submit complete separate applications (including the application fee and all required supporting documents) to both degree granting units of the university. Joint degrees are conferred simultaneously after all requirements for both degrees have been met.

Joint J.D. (Law)-M.S. in L.I.S. Program

Library and Information Science and the Columbus School of Law offer a joint-degree program to provide academic preparation for law librarianship. Many law library positions require both a law degree and a library and information science degree. The total number of library and information science semester hours of graduate credit required is reduced to 27, and a student in the program may apply up to 12 library science credits toward the J.D. degree.

Joint M.A. (History)-M.S. in L.I.S. Program

Library and Information Science and the Department of History offer a joint-degree program requiring a total of 51 semester hours of graduate credit-21 in history and 30 in library and information science. Completion of both degrees separately would require a total of 66 hours.

Joint M.S. (Biology)-M.S. in L.I.S. Program

Library and Information Science and the Department of Biology offer a joint-degree program requiring a total of 60 semester hours of graduate credit. Of the total credit hours, between 24 and 30 must be in biology and between 30 and 36 must be in library and information science.

Joint M.A. (Musicology)-M.S. in L.I.S. Program

Library and Information Science and the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music offer a joint degree program in music librarianship in which students take 30 semester hours of graduate credit in library and information science and 21 hours in the graduate program in musicology.

Joint M.A. (English)-M.S. in L.I.S. Program

Library and Information Science and the Department of English offer a joint-degree program that enables students to have careers as editors in publishing, humanities librarians or antiquarian booksellers. The program requires 54 semester hours, 30 hours in library science and 24 in English.

Joint M.A. (Religious Studies)-M.S. in L.I.S. Program

Library and Information Science and the School of Theology and Religious Studies offer a joint degree requiring a total of 51 graduate semester hours, 27 in library and information science and 24 in religious studies. Two specializations are available: Religious Studies and Archival Management, and Librarianship and Religious Studies.

School Library Media Program

The school library media program is selected by students who wish to work with young people in school libraries of public and private K-12 institutions. The Catholic University of America program is recognized by the states of Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia. This course of study is offered both as part of our Online & Weekend Learning (OWL) program and in traditional face to face format.

The course of study listed below has program accreditation by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and by the American Library Association (ALA).

The CUA Library and Information Science program offers a variety of courses that focus on school library media services. Each student is required to take the four required core courses along with appropriate mid-level and advanced courses.

Note that very specific requirements must be fulfilled in order to receive the state-issued certificate, which is required to work in public school libraries. Because of this, it is vitally important that students pursuing this program of study stay in close contact with their advisor to ensure that their course work will fulfill state requirements. Students who lack valid teaching certificates should be aware that there is a high probability that they will be required to take some education courses, in addition to the courses listed below, to qualify for certification as a school media specialist.

Required core courses for all students are:

SC 551 Organization of Information
LSC 553 Information Sources and Services
LSC 555 Information Systems in Libraries and Information Centers
LSC 557 Libraries and Information in Society

Students interested in receiving the school library certification are required to take the following electives:

LSC 603 Technical Services
LSC 606 Cataloging and Classification
LSC 731 Media Integration in the Curriculum
LSC 752 Design and Production of Multimedia
LSC 835 Administration of School Library Media Programs
LSC 848 Media for Children
LSC 849 Media for Adolescents
LSC 695B Practicum

 

Transfer or Waiver of Credit

Transfer of Credit

Students may request that six semester credit hours of graduate course work from another institution be accepted for transfer into the M.S.L.I.S. program. Students requesting transfer of credit must submit a completed Transfer of Credit/Waiver Request Form for each course; an official transcript issued to the school directly from the institution attended, and catalog descriptions of the course. The transfer must be approved by the student's adviser, department chair,  and the dean of the school. Guidelines for acceptance of credits are as follows:
  1. The student has already successfully completed 12 semester hours in the school with at least a 3.0 average.
  2. The courses were taken by the student after receiving the bachelor's degree.
  3. A grade of B or better was received in the course(s) for which the transfer of credit is requested.
  4. The course(s) taken are designated on the official transcript of the granting academic institution as graduate courses, and the transcript is on file in the office of Library and Information Science. (An official transcript is one issued by the institution attended that is forwarded directly to the school office and bears the seal of the university, the signature of the registrar and the date of issue.)
  5. The student is not already excused from six semester hours because the student holds a graduate degree in another subject area.
Approval for transfer of credit involves a number of factors, including the accreditation status of the institution from which graduate courses are transferred, the specific content of the courses and their consistence with the program of study that the student is pursuing at The Catholic University of America. A primary consideration is that the transferred courses not duplicate the content of courses taken in the master's degree program at Catholic University.

Courses outside the field of library and information science may be approved for transfer. The purpose of allowing courses to be taken outside of the professional program is to give students opportunities to gain competencies which are not available in the department, but which will substantially contribute to their education as information professionals. The student must demonstrate how the course will materially and specifically contribute to the student's professional education, make the student's program a more cohesive whole, and lead to a specific educational attainment for the student. Students without previous library education courses or extensive experience are advised to confine their efforts to library and information science courses.

Waiver of Core Courses

Although no more than six semester hours can be accepted for transfer, some course work in library and information science may be acceptable in lieu of core courses in the department, but such acceptance of one or more course waivers will in no way result in a decrease in the number of credit hours required for the MSLIS.  An elective course must be taken for each course waived.

Students must petition for waiver of core courses by completing Transfer of Credit/Waiver Request Form. An official transcript and a catalog description must also be submitted. Waivers of core courses must be approved by the student's adviser and the chair.

Previous Graduate Degree Exemption

A student who holds one or more accredited graduate degrees when admitted to the school will be automatically exempt from six semester credit hours, but all remaining credit must be earned within Library and Information Science. An official transcript of the graduate degree must be submitted at the time application is made to the school.

Academic Program Overview

Master of Science in Library and Information Science (MSLIS)

The MSLIS degree is highly relevant in the 21st Century. In today's information intensive society, the demand for professionals with the ability to manage information and data and help people navigate the dynamic and changing information environment is very high. Our graduates assist users and organizations in finding information, making sense of information, and using information to support decision making. The roles of information professionals are expanding and becoming more stimulating and rewarding than ever.

Graduates of the MSLIS program might find themselves employed in library settings such as academic or K-12 school libraries. They may work for special libraries serving government agencies, businesses, non-profits, or organizations that make intensive use of information, such as think-tanks. They may work as reference librarians, information architects, managers of information systems, and digital librarians who manage data and information on the internet.

Master of Science in Information Technology with a concentration in Health Information Technology (MSIT-HIT)

MSIT-HIT program was launched in 2010 with a grant from the United States Department of Labor. This degree provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to develop and manage the information systems that support patient care and research and thereby play an important role in a number of healthcare settings. The field of Health Information Technology is one of the fastest growing in the country, with the Bureau of Labor Statistic predicting 20% growth through 2018.

Post-Masters Study

Students may enroll as a post-master's student to take selected courses or pursue a certificate. Whether you need to take a course for employment reasons, or you just want to stay current, LIS courses can help.

Courses Offered

Note: Classes offered by Library and Information Science at off-campus, satellite locations are preceded with the CLSC department code. Courses offered on campus are preceded with the LSC department code.

Please consult the course catalog for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

Additional Information

Courses Open to Undergraduates

Courses at the 500 and 600 levels are open to undergraduates at The Catholic University of America, who may begin graduate studies in library and information science while fulfilling undergraduate degree requirements. The students must obtain the permission of their advisers as well as the chair of Library and Information Science. Credits earned in excess of those required for the undergraduate degree may be applied toward the M.S.L.I.S. program only after the undergraduate degree has been conferred and the student has officially applied and been accepted to the program by the Admissions Committee.

Listserv

The Library and Information Science program at CUA maintains several lists that serve our community:
For more information and instructions see LIS Listserv Instructions.

Advising System

Upon admission, students are assigned advisers based on the areas of interest stated in their applications. Students are expected to make contact with faculty advisers by e-mail, in person or by phone each semester. Advisers assist students in planning academic programs, reviewing progress, and career counseling. It is the school's philosophy that regular contact between advisers and students contributes both to the student's success and to our ongoing evaluation of the program. Students are expected to plan a balanced program of study of core courses, basic courses, and specialized electives with the assistance of their advisers. Course selections should be approved by the student's adviser.

Career Services

Catholic University maintains an excellent Career Services office to help students and alumni secure employment after graduation. They are able to help students with resumes and cover letters and help them search for job openings. Alumni may also want to check out the Alumni Career Network for more information.

Continuing and Post-Master Education

The continuing education program is designed to offer librarians, archivists, and information specialists the opportunity to update and expand their professional competencies and skills.

Taking courses post-masters

Students may enroll as a post-master's student to take selected courses. Whether you need to take a course for employment reasons, or you just want to stay current, LIS courses can help. Take a look at the Course Catalog, and see what catches your eye.

Post-Masters Certificate

Students may enroll in the post-master's certificate program which culminates in an advanced certificate in library and information science. This program consists of 24 graduate semester credit hours, six of which may be taken in related disciplines. Course selection is at the discretion of the student, so you can customize the program in any way you choose.

In this program, the student also may choose to register for an independent study to investigate a particular problem under the direction of a full-time faculty member. Arrangements for independent studies must be made with the instructor well in advance of registration.

Advanced Certificate Program in Library Leadership and Management

A joint program of the Metropolitan School of Professional Studies and Library and Information Science, the Advanced Certificate Program in Library Leadership and Management is intended for librarians who have completed their Masters, but have found themselves in management positions or feel they need competency in management to advance in their careers. It offers the management education librarians may have missed in the Library Program, and it is specifically designed with the needs of working librarians in mind.

It is flexible and customizable to meet the needs of LibrarianManagers in all sectors of the profession: higher education, public librarianship, school library media programs, specialized information and knowledge services, and those working in nontraditional information services roles.

The Advanced Certificate requires 18 credit hours, consisting of the following 6 courses:

  •     MBU 505: Project Management (Metropolitan School of Professional Studies)
  •     MBU 652: Managerial Decision-Making: Tools and Techniques (Metropolitan School of Professional Studies)
  •     LSC 672: Management
  •     LSC 635: Use and Users of Libraries and Information
  •     LSC 675: Research Methods in Library and Information Science
  •     LSC 695A: Practicum

Disability Services

At CUA, all events open to the public will be scheduled in an accessible space. For events open to students, faculty and staff only (i.e. the university community) event coordinators shall make reasonable efforts to ensure that events are scheduled in accessible spaces. If for any reason a LIS event is scheduled in a space that is not accessible, and LIS receives a request for an accommodation from an individual with a disability, LIS will work with the appropriate office to find an alternate location that is accessible.

For specific guidelines on accommodations for those with hearing impairments please consult the Interpreter/Transcriber Request Policy.

For further information on making events accessible please see the Disability Support Services web page.

Honor Society

Beta Phi Mu, the international honor society for professional librarians, established the Iota chapter at the school in 1964. The faculty nominates outstanding students who meet the requirements as defined by the society for invitations to join the society in the calendar year following their graduation.

Student Organizations

All students registered in the M.L.S. degree program are members of the Association of Graduate Library and Information Science Students, which each year elects officers and sends representatives to the Graduate Student Association of The Catholic University of America. AGLISS invites speakers to the campus and schedules social events during the school year.

There are active student chapters of the Special Libraries Association and the American Society for Information Science and Technology. Students also participate in the activities of other area professional associations, including the Law Librarians Society of Washington, D.C., and the Catholic Library Association.

There are the three student associations for Library and Information Science students:
In addition to these organizations, all LIS students are automatically members of the Graduate Student Association at Catholic University.

Department of Mathematics

Professors Kiran R. Bhutani, Chair; Alexander Levin
Professors Emeriti Victor M. Bogdan; Lawrence Somer
Associate Professors Sherif El-Helaly; Paul G. Glenn; Guoyang Liu; Farzana A. McRae
Assistant Professor Chisup Kim; Prasad Senesi; Vijay Sookdeo

The Department of Mathematics is not admitting students to the graduate degree program until further notice.

Center for Medieval and Byzantine Studies

Program Director: Lilla Kopár

 

Center for Medieval and Byzantine Studies website and faculty listinghttp://mbs.cua.edu

 

The Center for Medieval and Byzantine Studies is under the general direction of an interdisciplinary committee selected from cooperating departments and schools, and offers both undergraduate and graduate programs. The study of the Middle Ages has enjoyed a special prominence at The Catholic University of America since its foundation in 1887 as a national university and center for graduate research. From its earliest years, CUA has fostered research in all the areas comprising the modern interdisciplinary fields of Medieval and Byzantine Studies and its faculties in the Schools of Arts and Sciences, Canon Law, Theology and Religious Studies, and Philosophy have always included distinguished medievalists. The John K. Mullen of Denver Memorial Library holds special collections in medieval history, canon law, philosophy, and theology as well as a fine selection of manuscripts and rare books. In addition, the university offers scholars proximity to the extraordinary special collections in Washington at the Library of Congress, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the National Gallery of Art, and the Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection.

In addition to university-wide scholarships, the program awards graduate stipends and the Lorraine Elisabeth Cella Memorial Scholarship Award for research support to outstanding students.

Members of the faculty in the Medieval and Byzantine Studies program are drawn from the Schools of Arts and Sciences, Philosophy, Theology and Religious Studies, Canon Law, and Music. Departments represented are English, Greek and Latin, History, Art, Modern Languages and Literatures, and Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures.

Certificate in Medieval Studies

The Certificate in Medieval Studies, composed of 15 graduate credit hours, is designed to offer students a broad experience in various components of medieval civilization, providing both perspectives and tools for specialized research. Students enrolled in the program may focus on the Medieval West, on Byzantine and Orthodox Studies, or the Islamic World, and follow an interdisciplinary curriculum consisting of courses in history and social structures, thought and worship, cultural and artistic expressions.

M.A. Degree in Medieval and Byzantine Studies

The M.A. degree, like the certificate, is designed as an interdisciplinary program that recognizes the complex intertwining of history, theology, philosophy, languages, literatures, and the arts for advanced study in any medieval or Byzantine field. In particular, students interested in acquiring the linguistic and methodological background necessary for advanced work in the many fields of Medieval Studies need a structure that permits the widest possible latitude. The programs allows students to specialize in the study of the Medieval West, Byzantium, or the Islamic World.

The coursework required for this degree is 30 credits hours in an interdisciplinary distribution (in the broad categories of History and Social Structures; Thought and Worship; and Cultural and Artistic Expressions), six of which may be for the completion of an M.A. thesis. Students who choose the non-thesis option must submit two research papers. A written comprehensive examination is required and the student must demonstrate reading proficiency in a modern research language and graduate-level competence in a relevant medieval language (Latin, Greek, or Arabic). A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.2 and the recommendation of the Center's Steering Committee are required to qualify for advancing to the doctoral program.

Ph.D. Degree in Medieval and Byzantine Studies

The Ph.D. program incorporates the M.A. curriculum while also requiring an additional 30 semester hours of coursework (in a designated area of specialization and one minor field), comprehensive exams, and a dissertation. The written comprehensive examinations are based on a reading list approved by the exam committee. Students must also demonstrate reading proficiency in two modern research languages and graduate-level competence in a medieval language or languages (Latin, Greek, Arabic, etc.) required for their research. Students must maintain a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.2 to continue in the program. 

Courses Offered

Courses are selected from the graduate course offerings of a variety of schools and departments and must be approved by the director or graduate advisor. Please consult the MBS website at http://mbs.cua.edu/current.cfm for a list of approved courses offered in the current semester.

 

MDST Course Title
592 Dir Readings  in Med&Byz Studies Masters
792 Dir Readings in Med&Byz Studies Doctoral
696 Thesis Guidance-Masters
698A Master's Comprehensive Exam with Classes
698B Master's Comprehensive Exam without Classes
996 Dissertation Guidance-Doctoral
998A Doctoral Comprehensive Exam with Classes
998B Doctoral Comprehensive Exam without Classes

Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

Professors

Bruno M. Damiani; Jean-Michel Heimonet; Stefania Lucamante

Associate Professors

Claudia Bornholdt, Chair; Margaret Ann Kassen; Hanna Marks; Mario A. Ortiz; Peter Shoemaker

Assistant Professors

Juanita Aristizábal; Daniel Garcia-Donoso, Chelsea Stieber

Clinical Assistant Professors 

Anamaria Banu; Daniel Colón; Gonzalo Campos-Dintrans; Serena Ferrando; Kerstin T. Gaddy;  Dolores Lima; Charmaine McMahon; Raluca Romaniuc; Katharina Rudolf; Amanda Sheffer

Clinical Instructor Shufen Hwang

M.A. Degree in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures

The normal preparation for graduate work in Spanish is a Bachelor's degree in that language. Students with a major in another field are required to have at least 24 semester hours of college work in Spanish, including a general survey of literature and an advanced language course, or their equivalents.

The program leading to the M.A. degree includes courses in four general areas: (1) Renaissance-Golden Age; (2) Colonial; (3) Modern and Contemporary Peninsular; and (4) Modern and Contemporary Spanish America. Students on a Teaching Fellowship are required to take ML 521: Prinicipals and Practice of Second Language Teaching. All students enroll in ML 531: Theory and Criticism. The elective courses have to be distributed evenly across the four general areas.

Required courses:

1 course ML 521: Principles and Practice of Second Language Teaching
1 course ML 531: Theory and Criticism
4 area courses (1 in each of the four area)
3 area courses (1 in three of the four areas)
1 free elective course

A minimum of 30 hours of graduate work is required; transfer of up to 6 credits is allowed with the adviser's recommendation. After completing their coursework, students must pass a comprehensive examination. It is comprised of four written exams: three exams that each test one of the areas plus an additional exam with questions on teaching Spanish.

Students who receive two grades of C or below are subject to dismissal from the program.

Ph.D. Program in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures

The Ph.D. is offered in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures. The program leading to the Ph.D. degree includes courses in four general areas: (1) Renaissance-Golden Age; (2) Colonial; (3) Modern and Contemporary Peninsular; and (4) Modern and Contemporary Spanish America. Candidates for the Ph.D. take a minimum of 54 semester hours of credit.

Required Courses:

Students entering the Ph.D. program with an M.A. from another instution, may transfer up to 24 credits. These students are required to enroll in the following courses: 

ML 521: Principles and Practice of Second Language Teaching
ML 531: Theory and Criticism
4 area courses: 1 in each of the 4 areas
3 area courses: 1 in three of the 4 areas
1 free elective course outside of the MLL department

Students transferring less than 24 credits will decide the distribution of any extra credits with the Director of Graduate Studies.

Students entering the Ph.D. program with an M.A. from CUA are required to earn a minimum of 24 credits beyond the credits counted for the M.A.

4 courses: 1 in each of the 4 areas.
3 elective courses within the department
1 free elective course outside of the MLL department.

Comprehensive Examination:

After completion of the required coursework, students take written and oral comprehensive exams:

1) Two written exams on general areas outside the area of specialization
2) One written exam covering the overall student’s area of specialization
3) One written exam covering an elective area within the student’s area of specialization
4) One oral exam to discuss the answers and topics of the written exams.

Dissertation Proposal:

After passing the comprehensive examination, students prepare their doctoral research proposal. The proposal is submitted to the dissertation director and then to the members of the dissertation committee for approval. The Ph.D. candidate then orally presents the proposal before the tenured and tenure-track faculty for final departmental approval and submits it with the request for approval of committee and topic to the Graduate Dean.

Required Research Languages:

M.A. Degree Candidates: Candidates for the M.A. degree in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures may be certified by the departmental chair as having fulfilled this requirement with their proficiency in Spanish. International students must be proficient in English.

Ph.D. Candidates: Candidates for the Ph.D. degree are required to demonstrate a reading knowledge of a second language. The research language will be chosen, with the adviser's approval, to fit the program selected by the candidate. Depending on the student's field of research, additional languages may be advisable.

The accepted method of satisfying this requirement is either:

1. Passing the Graduate School Foreign Language Test;

2. Satisfactorily completing the department's noncredit intensive course in the language, Reading for Comprehension (500);

3. Having a Ph.D. minor in the language and receiving certification of such from the departmental chair; or

4. Being certified as having proven competency in the language in a graduate course on the 500 level or above.

Directed Reading Courses

The department also offers independent study courses to accommodate the needs of individual students under special circumstances.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

CATA Course Title
500 Introduction to Catalan
CELT Course Title
535 Intro to Spoken Gaelic
536 Intro to Spoken Gaelic II
594 Independent Study
FREN Course Title
500 Reading for Comprehension
GER Course Title
500 Reading for Comprehension
ITAL Course Title
500 Reading for Comprehension
ML Course Title
521 Principles & Practice of 2nd Language Teaching
531 Introduction to the Graduate Study of Literature
SPAN Course Title
500 Reading for Comprehension
501

Span Language & Culture for Health Professional

522 Prose of the Golden Age
523 Golden Age Poetry
524 Pastoral Novel
525 Survey of Golden Age Drama
534 Prose of The Spanish Mystics
535 Religion in 19th-21th Century Spanish Narrative Fiction
540 Literature of Post Civil War Spain
541 The 18th Century and Romanticism in Spain
542 Realism in Spain
543 Generation of 1898 & Modernism
544 Generation of 1927-Vanguardism
545 Modern Spanish Short Story & Novella
546 Spanish Literature of the Turn of the Century (1880-1920)
550 Mexican Civilization
556 Latin American Popular Song: Socio-Political Movements
559 Colonial Women: From Early Modern to Postmodern Icons
561 Aesthetics of the Encounter: Exploration and Conquest of Latin America
564 National and Post-National Narratives in Spanish American Fiction
569 Spanish American Modernismo and it Legacy
570 Mexican Literature and Film
573 Central American Testimonial Tradition
594 Independent Study
595 Internship
631 Cervantes & The Quijote
641 19th Century Spanish Narrative
642 Modern Spanish Narrative
650 Sor Juana Ines De La Cruz: Her Baroque World and Modern Representations
652 19th Century Spanish-American Novel
653 20th Century Spanish-American Novel
656 Early Modern Female Conventual Culture
657 New Latin American Historical Novel
658 The Mexican Conquest: European and Indigenous Accounts
694 Independent Study
695 Internship
696 Thesis Guidance
698A Master's Comprehensive Exam (with courses)
698B Master's Comprehensive Exam (without courses)
794 Independent Study
998A Doctoral Comprehensive Exam (with courses)
998B Doctoral Comprehensive Exam (without courses)
996 Dissertation Guidance

 

Department of Physics

Professors Steven B. Kraemer, Chair; ; Ian L. Pegg; Lorenzo Resca; Daniel I. Sober
Professors Emeriti Hall L. Crannell; Jack R.Leibowitz; Paul H.E. Meijer; Herbert M. Uberall; Carl W. Werntz; Pedro Macedo
Adjunct Professors Arthur Aikin; Michael Bell; Natchimuthukonar Gopalswamy; Theodore Gull; Yoji Kondo;
Research Professors Vladimir Krasnopolsky; Donald J. Michels; Leon Ofman; Frederick C. Bruhweiler
Associate Professors Duilia F. DeMello; Biprodas Dutta; Franz J. Klein; John Philip; Vadim Uritsky
Adjunct Associate Professors  Michael DiSanti
Research Associate Professors Pamela Clark; Alexander Kutepov; Myron A. Smith; Richard Starr; Glenn M. Wahlgren; Tommy G. Wiklind  
Assistant Professors Tanja Horn;  Abhijit Sarkar
Adjunct Assistant Professor Isabelle Muller;
Research Assistant Professors Peter C. Chen;  Thomas Moran; Krister Nielsen
Research Associates Boncho Bonev; Jeffrey Brosius; Ronald Carlson; Patrick Collins; Artem Feofilov; Sergei Ipatov; Rosina Iping; Sungmu Kang; Gladys Vieira Kober; Maxim Kramar; Allen Lunsford; Ryan Milligan; Norman F. Ness; Sten Odenwald; Vladimir Osherovich; Judit Pap; Lutz Rastaetter; Nelson Reginald; Michael Reiner; Joachim Schmidt; Richard Schwartz; Malgorzata Selwa; Ekaterina Verner; Geronimo Villanueva; Gerald Williger; Hong Xie; Seiji Yashiro

The Department of Physics offers programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science and Doctor of Philosophy in Physics. These degrees are designed to prepare the candidate for a professional research career. Research areas include materials science, astrophysics, nuclear physics, condensed matter physics, statistical mechanics and vitreous state physics. In addition, arrangements can be made for cooperative research projects in nearby governmental laboratories such as GSFC, NRL, and NIST. All incoming students must take a preliminary examination at the undergraduate level at the beginning of their first semester of residence. The exam serves as a diagnostic tool for course placement.

The department also offers Master of Science Degrees in Nuclear Environmental Protection (NEP) and, in collaboration with the School of Engineering, in Materials Science and Engineering (MSE).

Master of Science Degree in Physics

Candidates for the M.S. degree in Physics must complete a minimum of 30 semester hours of graduate work in residence. A B average should be maintained. In the nonthesis program at least 24 semester hours must be in physics, and no more than nine of these may be in courses numbered below 600. In the thesis option, at least 18 semester hours must be in physics, six of which may be in research guidance and not more than nine in courses numbered below 600. For either option, the student must satisfactorily pass a comprehensive examination.

Master of Science Degree in Materials Science and Engineering (MSE)

Many fields of science and engineering are concerned with selection and design of materials. The Masters program in MSE is expected to draw a diverse mixture of full- and part-time students interested in enhancing their careers. The program, directed by Associate Professor Biprodas Dutta (Physics) is housed in the School of Engineering but will also draw on expert faculty and resources from the School of Arts and Sciences, including the Department of Physics.The program has a strong research component, which will be facilitated by CUA’s Nanotechnology Center. The curriculum emphasizes advances in existing and emerging technologies in six areas: nanotechnology; biomaterials; magnetic and optical materials; glasses, ceramics and metallurgy; processing and instrumentation and structural materials. Working professionals will find the program designed for them, with evening courses offered at an affordable tuition.For details on the Materials Science and Engineering Program, go to http://materialscience.cua.edu .

Master of Science Program in Nuclear Environmental Protection (NEP)

The current reevaluation of nuclear power options, including fuel recycling and underground disposal options for used fuel and other high-level wastes, is crucially dependent on the role of and commitment to nuclear environmental protection. In addition, environmentally responsible cleanup of legacy wastes from the Manhattan Project and the cold war demands that a large and well-educated workforce of nuclear professionals be trained over the next several decades.The NEP Master’s program contributes to these goals by providing thorough understanding of the underlying chemical, physical, materials and radiation safety aspects as well as of transport, storage, disposal, and regulatory issues. The degree will provide students with immediate marketability as well as significantly increased career opportunities for professionals working in nuclear and related fields.

The NEP program consists of a total of eight courses (three credits each) and a final project (six credits) and requires one year (full time) or two to three years (part time) to complete. Students must earn at least a ‘B’ grade point average (3.0 on a 4.0 scale) – both overall and on the final project. The program is open to students with undergraduate degrees in science or engineering who have completed undergraduate level courses in chemistry and physics. For details on the NEP program, go to http://nep.cua.edu

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in physics are required to complete 53 semester hours, of which 35 must be in physics. A B average should be maintained. Mastery of the material presented in PHYS 525, 611, 612, 615, 621, 622, 623, 624, 659 and 660 is required of all students. Additional work is arranged according to the preferences of the student. A maximum of nine semester hours in courses below 600 may be applied toward the degree. A comprehensive examination, which includes both written and oral parts, must be passed after the equivalent of two full years of study. In addition, candidates must present a satisfactory dissertation.

Prospective students are invited to write to the department for additional information.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

PHYS Course Title
506 Introduction to Modern Physics
511 Mathematical Physics I
512 Mathematical Physics II
521 Advanced Research Practice I
522 Advanced Research Practice II
523 Readings in Physics I
524 Readings in Physics II
525 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics
528 Optics
531 Quantum Theory I
532 Quantum Theory II
534 Advanced Physical Laboratory
535 Analytical Mechanics
536 Electricity and Magnetism
537 Intermediate Nuclear Physics
540 Materials Science: Solids
541 Nanotechnology
543 Introduction to Astrophysics
562 Space Weather I: Solar Physics
563 Space Weather II: Earth/Sun Interactions
564 Space Weather III: Magnetospheric Physics
565 Intermediate Solid State Physics
569 Introduction to Biophysics
591 Solar Data Analysis
592 Directed Readings, MS
593 Directed Research, MS
611 Mathematical Methods of Theoretical Physics I
612 Mathematical Methods of Theoretical Physics II
613 Geometrical Methods of Mathematical Physics
614 Group Theory
615 Advanced Mechanics I
616 Advanced Mechanics II
617 Theoretical Methods of Fluid and Elastic Continua
618 Nonlinear and Chaotic Dynamics
621 Statistical Mechanics I
622 Statistical Mechanics II
623 Advanced Electromagnetic Theory I
624 Advanced Electromagnetic Theory II
625 Stellar Astrophysics and Space Astronomy
626 Astrophysics: L-D Plasmas
635 Nuclear Physics
636 Introduction to High and Medium Energy Physics
641 Nanotechnology
644 Computational Physics
645 Topics in Astrophysics I
646 Topics in Astrophysics II
651 Elements of Statistics and Probability
652 Analysis of Experimental Error
659 Advanced Quantum Theory I
660 Advanced Quantum Theory II
662 Quantum Theory: Many Particle Systems
665 Solid State Physics I
666 Solid State Physics II
692 Directed Readings, MS
693 Directed Research, MS
696 Thesis/Dissertauion Guidance, MS
698A Comprehensive Exam, MS
698B Comprehensive Exam, MS
750 Theory of Relativity
761 Relativistic Quantum Field Theory I
762 Relativistic Quantum Field Theory II
777 Graduate Research Seminiar I
778 Graduate Research Seminar II
781 Physics of Glass
782 Physics of Simple Liquids
785 Department Colloquium
786 Department Colloquium
787 Seminar in Nuclear Physics
797 Seminar in Astrophysics I
798 Seminar in Astrophysics II
992 Directed Readings, PhD
993 Directed Research, PhD
996 Thesis Guidance, PhD
998A Comprehensive Exam, PhD
998B Comprehensive Exam, PhD
999 Dissertation Defense

Department of Politics

Professors Claes G. Ryn; Wallace J. Thies; David Walsh; John Kenneth White
Professors Emeriti  Joan B. Urban
Associate Professors Dennis J. Coyle; Matthew Green; Phillip Henderson, Chair; John A. Kromkowski; Maryann Cusimano Love; James P. O'Leary; Stephen Schneck
Assistant Professors Christopher Darnton; Dorle Hellmuth; Andrew Yeo
Lecturers  Lee Edwards; Ben K. Fred-Mensah; Matthew Glassman; Sergei Gretsky; John Hurley; Richard Love; James Quirk; Eric Thompson; James Wallner
Director of Off-Campus Programs Diana Rich

Subject to the general regulations for graduate study at The Catholic University of America and the School of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Politics offers programs leading to the degrees of Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy. The following fields of instruction are offered: Political Theory, American Government and World Politics. In addition to the on-campus M.A. and Ph.D. programs, two special master's degree programs are offered off campus: the M.A. in Congressional and Presidential Studies and the M.A. in International Affairs. In cooperation with the School of Business and Economics, the department also offers a master's degree in international political economics, but is not accepting applications to this program for the 2013-2014 academic year. In cooperation with the Columbus School of Law, the department offers a joint M.A.-J.D. program.

Master of Arts Degree

Admission

Students may be admitted to the department provided they have graduated from an accredited college with an average of B or better. The Graduate Record Examination is also required from all applicants, excepting only MA/JD joint degree applicants for whom the LSAT is accepted. Students should have completed 15 semester hours in the social sciences, including nine hours in political science.

Requirements for Graduation

Coursework

For the master's degree, a minimum of 30 semester hours of coursework is required. A 3.0 grade point average or better must be maintained. American Government and Political Theory students must take POL 651 and 652 (Political Theory I and Political Theory II). World Politics students may concentrate in either International Relations or Comparative Politics, and they must take POL 606 (Introduction to International Affairs) and 607 (Graduate Introduction to Comparative Politics). Students who concentrate in American Government are required to complete POL 625 (Graduate Introduction to American Government). Students who select Political Theory or World Politics as their fields of concentration must take at least six hours in the other fields offered by the department. With the approval of the chair or graduate coordinator, students may transfer up to six credits from another institution.

Research Skill Requirements

All on-campus M.A. students, and all off-campus M.A. students in Internatonal Affairs, must demonstrate basic competence in a research skill, which can be either a foreign language or a methodology. For the acceptable means of demonstrating basic competence in a foreign language, which may be a classical language, students should consult General Requirements for Graduate Study in the General Information section of these Announcements. Note: courses taken in statistics, a foreign language, or other research skills do not count toward the 30-credit minimum course requirement for the M.A. degree.

For students in Political Theory, only languages are acceptable. For students in World Politics, either languages or statistics are acceptable. For students in American Government, languages, statistics, historiography, and other qualitative methodologies, such as archival methods, are acceptable.

All M.A. students are also required to demonstrate successful completion of major research papers. Generally, this requirement is met by submitting two faculty-approved seminar papers to the Department in the semester before the comprehensive examination. These papers must be signed by a member of the faculty indicating completion of research and writing at an advanced level. In some cases, students may satisfy the research requirement by electing to write a faculty-supervised master's thesis on a topic approved by the department and the dean of the School of Arts and Sciences. Students choosing this option register twice for Thesis Guidance and earn six credits upon deposit of the approved thesis.

The department may require additional research skills, if this is considered necessary for satisfactory completion of the student's program.

Comprehensive Examination

Students who have completed or are in the final semester of 30 hours of coursework must take a written comprehensive examination in their field of concentration. Courses completed to satisfy language or methodology requirements are not counted toward the 30 hours. The comprehensive examinations are offered only twice each year, in March and October. All core courses, research skills, and seminar paper requirements should be completed by the end of the semester prior to the comprehensive examination.

Congressional and Presidential Studies and International Affairs Programs

The Department of Politics offers an M.A. program in International Affairs and an M.A. program in Congressional and Presidential Studies (CAPS) at the Hall of States building on Capitol Hill. For these M.A. programs, students must complete 30 hours of coursework in the field, complete and submit two seminar papers to the department signed by faculty members, and successfully pass a comprehensive examination. In CAPS, two courses are required: CPOL 671 The Modern Congress and CPOL 626 The Modern Presidency. In International Affairs, one course is required: CPOL 500 Introduction to International Affairs. Additionally, International Affairs students must demonstrate basic competency in a foreign language or statistical methods. Off-campus graduate courses are designated by the prefix CPOL and are listed after the on-campus courses. All core courses, research skill and seminar paper requirements are to be completed by the end of the semester prior to the comprehensive examination.

M.A. in International Political Economics (Not Accepting Applications for Academic Year 2013-2014)

The interdisciplinary Program in International Political Economics offers graduate students both theoretical training and exposure to central policy issues. This program combines graduate studies in politics and economics. Individuals interested in aspects of international economic relations, such as international business, finance, banking or government service, will find the program of particular value. Thirty-six semester hours of graduate credit are required.

Joint J.D.-M.A. Program

The Department of Politics, in cooperation with the Columbus School of Law, offers a joint J.D.-M.A. program. This program allows students to pursue the J.D. and M.A. degrees concurrently and to finish both programs more quickly than if each degree were pursued independently. In this program, students may apply nine semester credits earned in the law school toward the M.A. degree and may apply 12 semester credits earned in the M.A. program toward the J.D. degree. Details of this program are available from the Department. Admission to this program requires a separate admission to the law school. To qualify as a joint degree, both the J.D. and the M.A. must be conferred in the same semester.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

Admission

Current students completing the Master's degree and interested in continuing in the doctoral program are encouraged to consult with their professors and the department chair or graduate coordinator before submitting an application for the higher degree. A student's ability to proceed with doctoral studies will be assessed by a committee of the faculty after the comprehensive examination at the Master's level has been evaluated. Students with prior M.A. degrees apply directly to the Ph.D. program, and may be required to take a qualifying examination and complete core courses at CUA. 

Transfer Students

Students who wish to transfer credit toward the Ph.D. program from another institution are encouraged to contact the graduate director after admission to review the process. A qualifying examination may be required to assess the student’s preparation in the major and minor fields. These examinations are scheduled each semester at the same time as the departmental comprehensive examinations.A maximum of 24 credits completed within five years and graded with B or better can be considered for transfer into the doctoral program after the student has demonstrated his or her preparation and is following a course sequence recommended by the graduate director in consultation with the student’s major faculty.

Course Requirements

Each student also will take 12 semester hours of coursework in a minor field, which is normally one of the department's other fields of instruction.

Independent Study

Doctoral students may be permitted to take up to nine semester hours in the form of independent study or directed reading. Such coursework must have the approval of the department chair or graduate coordinator and must be done under the supervision of a faculty member.

Research Skill Requirements

All Ph.D. students are required by the department to demonstrate (a) basic competence in one research skill and (b) advanced competence in a second research skill. For Political Theory students, both skills must be foreign languages; for World Politics students, at least one of the skills must be a foreign language.

Students should consult the General Requirements for Graduate Study in the General Information section of these Announcements to review the acceptable means of demonstrating basic competence in a foreign language, which may be a classical language. Advanced competence in a language, meaning an ability to conduct research in the language, is demonstrated by means of an additional examination to be arranged by the department.

Students in World Politics may offer statistics as one of the two required research skills. Students in American Government may also substitute qualitative methodologies such as archival methods or historiography for a language, with the approval of the chair or graduate coordinator.

Doctoral students must also submit to the department four faculty-approved seminar papers (or two such papers in addition to completion of a master's thesis) by the semester prior to the Ph.D. major doctoral comprehensive examination. Students should submit papers from at least two different faculty members.

The department may require additional research skills, if considered necessary for satisfactory completion of the student's program.

Comprehensive Examination

Doctoral students are required to take written comprehensive examinations in both their major field of concentration and their minor field. The major and minor comprehensive examinations are ordinarily taken in different semesters. An advisory oral preliminary examination is conducted prior to the written examination in the major field.  All core courses, research skills, and seminar paper requirements are to be completed by the end of the semester prior to the major comprehensive examination.

Admission to Candidacy

Admission to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree in the Department of Politics is contingent upon the department's approval, following a satisfactory level of performance on the Ph.D. major comprehensive examination. Full-time doctoral students are encouraged to submit an acceptable dissertation topic by the end of the semester following the completion of comprehensive examinations in the major and minor fields. Part-time doctoral students are encouraged to submit an acceptable dissertation topic by the end of the second semester following the completion of comprehensive examinations in the major and minor fields. The formal proposal needs departmental approval before being submitted to the dean no later than the fourth semester of candidacy.

Institute for Policy Research and Catholic Studies (IPR) 

The Institute offers a limited number of competitive graduate fellowships. Fellows work with faculty associates of the Institute and on programs sponsored by IPR. The Institute is multi-disciplinary, with an emphasis on policy issues relevant to Catholic social thought.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at http://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester. Course schedules and descriptions may also be found under "current students" on the Department of Politics web page, http://politics.cua.edu/courses/.

 

POL Course Title
500 Utopias & Utopian Thought
501 Globalization
502 Democracy and Its Critics
503 Image of Utopia in Film
504 Community, Technology, Planning

505A

Constitutional Democracy in Theory and Practice

506 Politics & the Imagination
507 The Supreme Court
508 The United States Presidency
509 Contemporary Issues in Urban & Ethnic Politics
510 Property Rights & Environmental Policy
513 Bureaucratic Politics & Administration
514 The New Political Anthropology
517 Comparative Ethic Politics
518 American Political Parties and the Political Process
519 Science Policy Issues: Environment
520 United States Political Leadership
521 Presidency and the Congress
523 Voting and Elections
524 The War on Terrorism
525 Insurgency, Civil War and Natn Bldg
529 Liberalism and Its Critics
530 Classics of Political Economy
532 Japanese Politics
532 Political Analysis: Policy Approach
534 Security after the Cold War
535 United States Foreign Policy
537 International Political Economy
538 Topics in International Political Economy
539 Contemporary Middle East II: Conflict & Compet.
540 New Issues in Old Europe
542 British Politics
545 Contemporary Issues in the UK
547 Nation Building
548 Contemporary Political Theory
551 American Constitutional Development
552 Migration & Development in the Americas
553 Constitutional Theory and Interpretation
554 Constitutional Political Economy
555 Conservatism
556 The Moral Problem of Politics
557 Contemporary Military Strategy
558 Just Peace
559 The Media & Foreign Policy
560 Issues in US Foreign Policy
561 War Crimes
562 Seminar: American Political Development
563 Politics of Post-Soviet Russia
566 Pacific Rim Relations
569 Economy & Democracy in East Asia
570 Contemporary Irish Society
571 Cinema & World Politics
572 Pol/Military Problems of Developing Nations
573 United States-Latin American Relations
575 International Politics: Atlantic Alliance
576 Ethics and Public Policy
577 Political Theory of the American Framing
578 Advanced Topics in Public Law
579 Capitalism
580 Grassroots Politics in Latin America
581 Seminar: Democracy and Political Science
583 Comparative Political Development
584 Jurisprudence
585 Constitutional in Comparative Perspective
587 US Policies Toward East Asia
588 Christian Democracy: Ideas & Institutions
589 Compar. Politics: Non-Western Politics & Culture
590 Contending Civilizations
591 Asian Political Patterns
591A State-Minority Relations in Asia
592 Directed Readings
593 Directed Research
594 Independent Study
595 Internship
599 Northern Ireland: Conflict & Culture
600 Irish Parliament Internship (Dublin)
601 Executive Branch Policy Making
602 Congress and Parliament
603 The Psychology of Foreign Policy Decisions
604 Topics in Legal/Social Theory
605 Political Science & the Polity
606 Introduction to International Affairs
607 Grad Intro Comparative Politics
608 Rethinking United States Foreign Policy Institutions
609 Contemporary Problems in Am. Mil. Strategy
610 Intro to Security Studies
611 Economic Issues & National Security
612 Post Cold War Intervention
613 Tradition and Modernity: The Urban Experience
614 Seminar: American Ethic Politics
615 Theory: Interpretation & Critique
616 American Electoral Behavior
617 Environmental Politics
618 The Problem of Sovereignty
619 Religion & Constitutionalism
620 Constitutionalism: Ideas & Institutions
621 Statistical Applications in Political Science
622 Hegel to Nietzsche
624 Graduate Seminar on Congress
625 Graduate: Introduction American Politics
626 Grad Constitutional Law
627 Seminar: The American Presidency
628 US Military Interventions
629 Separation of Powers
631 Theories of International Politics
632 Foreign Policy Decision Making
633 Electoral Politics in Post-Soviet Russia
634 Research Design: Strategies & Skills
635 Statistical Methods
641 Contemporary Theory & Res. Comp. Pol.
643 Christian Political Thought
644 Modern Christian Political Thought
645 Classical Political Thought
651 Political Theory I
652 Political Theory II
653 Marx & Political Theory
655 Bush v. Gore: Constitutionalism Besieged
662 Interdisciplinary Empirical Theory & World Politics
663 The Cold War & Soviet Archives
666 Environment and Development
681 Graduate Survey American Political Thought
682 Seminar: East Asian Political Thought
690 Politics of Reconstruction/Reparation
692 Directed Readings
693 Directed Research
694 Independent Study
695 Internship
696 Thesis Guidance
698A Master's comprehensive (with courses)
698B Master's comprehensive (without courses)
701 German Idealism & Aftermath
702 Seminar: Philosophy & History
703 Seminar: International Political Economics
704 Seminar: International Pol. of the Atlantic Region
705 Seminar: Hegel
706 Seminar: Voegelin
707 Seminar: Comparative Urban Policy
708 Seminar: Political Development
709 Seminar: Topics Int'l. Pol. Econ.
710 Seminar: Rousseau and Kant
711 Seminar: The American Presidency
712 Heidegger & Political Theory
713 Adv Topics: Constitution Design
716 Seminar: Amer. Electoral Behavior
718 Adv. Seminar: Aristotle & Augustine
719 Political Thought Reform. Tradition
720 Seminar: Historicism
721 Seminar: Third World Development
722 Seminar: Irving Babbitt
723 Seminar: Politics & Imagination
724 Seminar: Russia, New/Old Euro, USA
726 Adv Topics: Constitutionalism & Public Law
736 Seminar: International Politics
740 Varieties of Capitalism
753 Seminar: Political Theory Heidegger
756 Political Theory Nietzsche
762 Seminar: Religion & American Founding
786 Seminar: Russia, Europe and World
892 Directed Readings
893 Directed Research
894 Independent Study
895 Internship
992

Directed Readings

993

Directed Research

994 Independent Study
995 Internship
996 Dissertation Guidance
998A Doctoral Comprehensive (with classes)
998B Doctoral Comprehensive (without classes)

The following courses are offered off campus as part of the M.A. programs in congressional studies and international affairs:

 

CPOL   Course Title
500   Introduction to International Affairs
501   Globalization
503   American Political Ideologies
509   Congress and Representation
512   Transnational Institutional Development
514   Terrorism and National Security
515   Peacekeeping, Peacemaking, & Ops Other Than War
518   Politics Peoples Republic of China
519   Politics of East Asia
520   US Political Leadership
524   The War on Terrorism
525   The Just War
528   Congressional Internship
529   Liberalism and Its Critics
531   Congressional Budget
532   Congressional Committees
534   Security after the Cold War
535   International Law of Armed Conflict
537   Political Economics and International Politics
538   Contemporary Middle East I
539   Contemporary Middle East II
540   Int'l Organization and Law
541   International Security Negotiations: Theory & Practice
543   National Security Law
544   Special Topics
545   Pacific Rim Relations
546   Intelligence and World Politics
547   Nation Building
548   International Politics of East and Southeast Asia
549   Politics of Latin America
550   For Policy-Peoples Republic of China
551   Africa in World Politics
557   Parliamentary Procedures in Congress
558   Just Peace
559   Media and Foreign Policy
560   Issues in US Foreign Policy
562   Rise and Fall of the Soviet Empire
563   Politics of Post-Soviet Russia
564   Ethno Culture in European Politics
565   Executive Branch Policy-Making
567   Arms Control, Disarmament & Non-Proliferation
574   European Integration and Security
575   Program and Policy Evaluation
576   Ethics and Public Policy
577   Political Theory of American Framing
579   Iran and Iraq
583   Comparative Political Development
584   International Politics of Central Asia States
585   Seminar: Politics of Islam
586   Political Change in East-Central Europe
593   Washington Internship
595   Independent Study
597   National Responses to Crisis
598   Insurgency and Revolution
601   Legislative Roles of the Executive Branch
602   The Legislative Presidency
608   Rethinking US Foreign Policy Institutions
612   Post Cold War Intervention
613   Law & Politics of Homeland Security
617   Warfare & World Politics
618   Problem of Sovereignty
620   Political Parties and Law
623   Congress, Presidential and Foreign Policy
624   Security in the Information Age
625   Grad Intro to American Politics
629   Contemporary Russian Politics and Euro Security
630   Classical Origins of IR Theory
650   Seminar on US Political Leadership
651   Political Theory I
652   Political Theory II
661   Congress and the Media
663   The Cold War & Soviet Archives
666   Executive & Legislative Leadership
725   Seminar: Post Cold War
670   Origins & Development of Congress
671   The Modern Congress
672   Congress & The Presidency
673   Congress & The Supreme Court
674   Congressional Parties and Elections
675   Interest Groups & Congressional Lobbying
676   The Policy Process in Congress
677   Special Topic in Congressional Studies
678   Property Rights & Environmental Policy
679   Research & Analysis Practical Politics
690   Civil War
701   Seminar: Democracy in East Asia
724   Seminar: Russia, New/Old Eur US
786   Seminar: Russia, Europe and World
594   Independent Study
694   Independent Study
592   Directed Readings
692   Directed Readings
696   Thesis - Masters

 

 

After passage of the M.A. comprehensive exam or a qualifying exam, a colloquium will be held with the student to review all the requirements for the Ph.D. degree.

For the doctoral degree a minimum of 54 semester hours of coursework is required, including those completed for the master's degree in the Department of Politics or transferred from another university. POL 651 and 652 (Political Theory I and II) are required of all doctoral students. Each student will complete 36 semester hours of coursework in a field of concentration within the department (including courses in the field of concentration which may have been taken toward the M.A.). Students in World Politics must take POL 606 and 607. Students concentrating in American Government are required to complete POL 625.

 

Department of Psychology

 

Professors

James F. Brennan, Provost; Carol R. Glass; James H. Howard Jr.; David A. Jobes; Martin A. Safer; Marc M. Sebrechts, Chair; Barry M. Wagner

Professors Emeriti

Diane B. Arnkoff; Antanas Suziedelis; James E. Youniss

Associate Professors

Sandra Barrueco, Deborah M. Clawson; Marcie Goeke-Morey

Assistant Professors

Claire E. Adams; Brendan Rich; J. Benjamin Hinnant

Visiting Assistant Professor

Nancy E. Adleman

Research Associates Jennifer A. Crumlish; Keith A. Kaufman; Edward Metz

Lecturers

Lisa D. Bailey; C. David Missar

The Department of Psychology, one of the first established in the United States, was founded by Edward Pace upon his return in 1891 from study with Wilhelm Wundt in Leipzig. From early in its history, the department has combined education in both theoretical and applied aspects of psychology.

The department offers three programs at the doctoral level: clinical psychology, applied-experimental psychology and human development; and three at the master's level: general psychology, human factors, and a joint J.D./M.A. program.

Master of Arts Degree

The department offers an M.A. in general psychology, a specialized M.A. program in human factors, and a joint J.D./M.A. program.

Prerequisites and Admission Requirements

Students applying for admission to the M.A. degree program must present a bachelor's degree from an accredited college. At least one course in general psychology or its equivalent is preferred, although not required. Additional coursework in basic areas of psychology is also desirable.

Information on application procedures, supplementary instructions, and links to application forms may be obtained at http://psychology.cua.edu/graduate. All application credentials should be sent to: Office of Graduate Admissions, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064. All MA applications should include a two- to three-page typed personal statement describing relevant background and reasons for seeking an MA degree at CUA.  In addition to the completed application form, the applicant should also request that the following be sent to graduate admissions: transcripts of undergraduate records and any other postsecondary studies; three letters of recommendation from officials or faculty members of the institution previously attended or from employment supervisors in the event that a long time has elapsed since the bachelor's degree studies. All M.A. programs, except the J.D./M.A. program, also require results of the verbal, quantitative and writing sections of the Graduate Record Examination. Applicants are not required to take the psychology section of the GRE. Acceptance into the J.D./M.A. program is contingent upon acceptance into the Columbus School of Law at CUA. Although applications are accepted throughout the year for all M.A. programs, applications must be received at least six weeks before the start of classes.

Applicants should note that admission to the M.A. program does not ensure admission to a Ph.D. program. After completion of the M.A. degree, students may reapply to the Ph.D. area of their choice.

Programs

The Master of Arts degree is offered in general psychology, human factors, and psychology and law (J.D./M.A.). A formal thesis is required in the Human Factors Program. The General M.A. and the J.D./M.A. programs are nonthesis degrees; however, completion of an in-depth topic paper is required.

General M.A. Degree. The Master of Arts in general psychology is awarded upon completion of 31 semester hours of credit, passing of a comprehensive examination and completion of a topic paper. There are four required courses: Historical and Biological Foundations, Cognitive and Social Foundations, Research Methods, and Statistical Methods I. The student must pass six additional courses from a variety of different areas in psychology. Students may complete a three-credit research apprenticeship and a three-credit independent readings course toward the requirement. Registration for Topic Paper Guidance is required during the semester in which the topic paper is completed.

Human Factors. The Human Factors Program provides a basic foundation in statistics, research methods and the applied-experimental techniques used by researchers in applied areas. The M.A. in human factors is awarded upon completion of 32 semester hours of credit (including directed readings and research apprenticeships), successful completion of a written comprehensive examination and successful defense of a master's thesis. There are five required courses: Historical and Biological Foundations, Cognitive and Social Foundations, Research Methods, Statistical Methods I and Statistical Methods II. Requirements for five additional courses are determined in consultation with the faculty advisor. Each student is encouraged to take up to six credits of approved coursework in a related area of concentration outside of psychology. Current areas of concentration in human factors are cognitive science, visualization and virtual reality, and human-computer interaction.

Joint J.D. (Law)-M.A. (Psychology). Students who have already been accepted to Catholic University's Columbus School of Law may apply for a joint program leading to simultaneous degrees in psychology and in law. The program requires 94 semester credit hours (72 in law, 22 in psychology), compared to 115 credits if the two degrees are pursued separately.

For further information on MA programs contact the Director of M.A. Programs, Dr. Martin Safer, at safer@cua.edu

Good Academic Standing

Any Master's student who receives (1) a grade of "F" in any course, (2) two "C" grades in any one semester, or (3) one "C" grade in each of two consecutive semesters will be subject to immediate academic review by a committee of the faculty. Upon hearing the committee's report and recommendations, the faculty may set specific conditions for the student to fulfill during a specified period of time in order to continue his or her good standing in the program. The committee may also recommend dismissal from the program.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

The first-year Ph.D. program introduces general scientific psychology and methodology. After the first semester, specialization begins with individual research tutorials and continues to the doctoral dissertation. Research papers and other scholarly products are required as part of this training. The third and fourth years of study (and fifth year internship in the clinical psychology program) are devoted primarily to the student's specialty.

At the end of every year each student's course grades and general academic standing are reviewed. Continuation of advanced studies toward the doctoral degree is contingent upon a favorable review of the student's progress and the successful completion of requirements set by the faculty.

Prerequisites and Admission Requirements

Prospective applicants can find program information and admission requirements on the department Web site, http://psychology.cua.edu. We prefer that applicants for the Ph.D. level of graduate study have taken the following undergraduate courses: General Psychology, Experimental Psychology (with laboratory), Statistics, and one semester of a laboratory science other than psychology. Additional coursework across the basic areas of psychology is highly weighted. Applicants must submit a curriculum vitae, a two-to three-page personal statement describing relevant background and reasons for seeking a Ph.D. degree at CUA, as well as the results of the Graduate Record Examination (including the subject test in psychology for clinical program applicants). The required letters of recommendation, together with the rating sheets, should be written by individuals familiar with the applicant's academic background and aptitude for graduate study.  Applicants to the clinical program must also submit a Clinical Psychology Interest Form. 

The application deadline for the Clinical Psychology Program is Dec. 1. The application deadline for the Applied Experimental and Human Development programs is February 1st for optimal scholarship consideration, although applications will be considered after that date.  All application materials for the doctoral programs should be sent to the Office of Graduate Admissions, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064.

Required Courses

Required courses for all Ph.D. students in the department are the following: Historical and Biological Foundations, Cognitive and Social Foundations, Research Methods, Statistical Methods I and II, Research Apprenticeship (three semesters). Additional hours of core electives also are required within each program. The remainder of the student's program is planned in consultation with an adviser.

For Ph.D. students, a grade of "C" or lower in any research apprenticeship or any practicum will result in the student's being placed on probation for one semester.  For all other courses, a student who receives a grade of "F" in any course or cumulatively receives two "C" grades will be placed on probation for one semester.  In each case, the program faculty will identify specific criteria for return to good academic standing.  If a student fails to return to and maintain good academic standing after two semesters on probation, he or she will be subject to dismissal from the program.  For Clinical PhD students, details of additional criteria for probation and good standing are contained in the Clinical Psychology Student Handbook (http://psychology.cua.edu/graduate/phdclproghandbook.cfm).

Completion of Degree Requirements

Coursework for the doctorate is usually completed within three or four years. The doctoral comprehensive examination is typically taken during the third year of study. Students are expected to complete all doctoral degree requirements within five years. For legitimate reasons, an extension of the time limit may be granted in individual cases by the faculty.

Programs

Three doctoral programs are offered: clinical psychology, applied-experimental psychology, and human development. In addition, the Children, Families and Cultures concentration provides interdisciplinary training in both normal and abnormal developmental processes within family and broader cultural contexts. Students wishing to train in that concentration are admitted to either the clinical or human development programs. Program information is available on the department's Web site, http://psychology.cua.edu.

While a minimum of 53 semester hours of credit is required for the Ph.D., of which a maximum of 24 may be transferred from other institutions, Ph.D. degree training involves considerably more than the accumulation of credits. The development of research and applied skills is fostered by active participation in department activities, by individual tutorials, and by experience in training placements. Ph.D. candidates from other departments desiring to minor in psychology must obtain approval of selection of courses from the Chair.

Clinical Psychology. The program is based on the scientist-practitioner model and is accredited by the American Psychological Association (Office of Program Consultation and Accreditation, American Psychological Association, 750 First Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20002, 202-336-5979,  http://www.apa.org/ed/accreditation). The goal of the program is the preparation of clinical psychologists with a thorough understanding of the science of psychology and its methods of investigation and a solid grounding in the application of psychology to the solution of human problems. Students receive supervised research and clinical experience at each level of graduate training to prepare them for careers in the research, teaching or professional aspects of clinical psychology. Research skills are taught through coursework, a three-semester research apprenticeship and the dissertation. Clinical skills are taught through courses and practica. Practicum experiences are provided on campus within the department and at the University's Counseling Center and off campus in a variety of mental health facilities. One year of the program is devoted to a full-time internship.

The concentration in Children, Families and Cultures involves both basic and applied research on children, couples and families. (More details are provided below in the Human Development section.) Training in both child and family therapies is offered to students, including a program that provides family therapy services to the community. Issues of culture are an essential ingredient of the theoretical, methodological, and intervention training and research.

Applied-Experimental Psychology. The Applied-Experimental Psychology Program offers advanced training in applied-experimental psychology, cognitive science and cognitive neuroscience to prepare individuals for careers in academic, industrial, government, health-care, and other settings that require strong research, analytical and writing skills. Although students are admitted to pursue the Ph.D. degree through a 5-year curriculum, they are awarded the M.A. degree after completing at least 30 hours of coursework (including the core courses), an M.A. thesis, and oral defense. A major objective of the program is to provide students with the knowledge and skills needed to understand, organize, and critique the scientific literature of the field, to develop and carry out original, scholarly research and to appreciate the translational implications of this work for practical problems.

Core Ph.D. courses are designed to provide a strong foundation for research. The foundations course sequence examines the basic science of psychology focusing on historical and biological foundations as well as on cognitive, social and affective areas including their neurological and developmental aspects. The two-semester sequence in statistics provides graduate-level training in the theory and application of statistics including the use of computer software for data analysis and modeling. The research methods course examines experimental, quasi-experimental and observational research designs as well as ethical standards and report preparation. A series of additional elective courses on advanced topics are taken to complete the formal pedagogical curriculum and required minimum of 53 credit hours. Course selection beyond the core curriculum is tailored to the individual needs and interests of each student. Students also have the option of electing certain courses offered in related departments at the University such as Social Work, Nursing and Biomedical Engineering as well as at CUA's sister institutions through the Washington Consortium of Universities.

Coursework is supplemented by "hands-on" research training throughout graduate study following an apprenticeship model. Within the first year, students identify a specialty related to the research interests of a program faculty member and receive research-intensive experience in that area. This experience includes carrying out a research project that is written up as a formal M.A. thesis and defended in an oral examination by the end of the second year. The program faculty members have research interests that span a wide range of issues, including cognitive psychology and cognitive neuroscience, cognitive aging, cognition and technology, social cognition and cognitive rehabilitation.

Research laboratories associated with the Applied-Experimental Psychology Program are located in O'Boyle Hall. The nine-room Cognitive Aging Lab includes sound-attenuated testing booths, a network of PC and Apple computers, and a workstation for the analysis of neuroimaging data. The Cognition and Virtual Reality Lab includes several workstations, two head-mounted displays with motion sensors, and a large rear projection screen.  Facilities are also available for eye-tracking research in a shared lab in Maloney Hall. The Cognitive Neuroscience laboratory includes a 64-channel EEG/Event Related Potential system. Other laboratories contain microcomputers and video equipment. The university's high-performance workstations are also available for students and faculty members.

Human Development. This program offers training in developmental psychology to prepare individuals for diverse career opportunities in government, private businesses and universities. Students gain a thorough knowledge of theory, basic research and applied research in the area of developmental psychology from infancy to old age. Students also gain competency with quantitative methods, qualitative methods and statistics. A sequence of relevant statistics and methods courses is required of all students. In the course of their training, students participate in ongoing research projects and conduct independent empirical investigations on selected topics. Following their first semester, students conduct research apprenticeships in developmental psychology each semester. All students are required to complete an empirical M.A. thesis and an oral thesis defense in order to be considered for Ph.D. candidacy.

The Human Development Program offers a concentration in Children, Families and Cultures (CFC). This concentration emphasizes both normal and abnormal processes in child and adolescent development and examines these processes in the context of family life as well as the broader cultural environments within which people live. Students specializing in this area take courses focusing on the importance of family and cultural processes for theoretical, methodological and applied work. Students also work with faculty on research projects that situate development within family and/or cultural contexts. A special asset of the human development program is its affiliation with the university's Institute for Policy Research and Catholic Studies. The institute houses researchers from the university as well as visiting scholars who study the human life span from interdisciplinary perspectives (such as psychology, sociology and political science). Research foci include community service, marriage and family, acculturation, and civic development.  More information can be found on the CFC web page under "Research Programs" (http://psychology.cua.edu/research/index.cfm.)

Other Information

Financial Support

For information concerning university scholarships and fellowships, contact the Office of Graduate Financial Aid, The Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 20064 or review the information at http://financialaid.cua.edu/aid-graduate.cfm. Applications completed by specified program deadlines (but no later than February 1) will be considered for University scholarships. A number of teaching assistantship positions are typically available to Ph.D. students in their second year or later. Research assistantship appointments are made by individual faculty.

Nondegree Students

Applicants may apply for nondegree status, although some courses are open only to students in particular Ph.D. sequences. The Director of M.A. Programs should be consulted for advice on available courses.

Nondegree students who later wish to be considered for degree status must submit updated applications ordinarily required for admission; however, there is no guarantee of acceptance into degree programs. If admitted as a regular student in a degree program, a maximum of three courses successfully completed as a nondegree student may be applied toward an advanced degree.

Clinical Training Centers

The university administers the on-campus Counseling Center, which provides psychological services to the student body. It is also a training site for a clinical practicum and externships. These clinical experiences allow doctoral students-in-training the opportunity to provide supervised personal, vocational, and educational counseling.

The Family Therapy Clinic, within the Department of Psychology, offers clinical psychology doctoral students supervised training experiences in family and couple therapy.

Institute for Policy Research & Catholic Studies (IPR)

The department is affiliated with an ongoing multidisciplinary research program involving the core social sciences covering many aspects of public policy.

The institute's interdisciplinary setting encourages students to have a broad perspective toward research and theory. Upon recommendation by the Department Chair and the IPR Director, students may hold appointments at the institute as research assistants.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.


PSY Course Title
592 Readings in Psychology
592A Readings in Psychology
592B Readings in Psychology
594 Independent Study
595 Psychology Internship
615 Forensic Psychology
617 Seminar on Suicide
619 Health Psychology
620 Psychology, Biology, and Technology
621 Cognitive Rehabilitation
622 Cognitive Development
624 Seminar: Cognitive Science
625 Cognitive Aging
627 Couples and Family Interaction
628 Psychology of Memory
631 Sensation and Perception
636

Human-Computer Interaction

640

Human Development
645 Social Development
652 Cultural Psychology
663 Social Psychology & Clinical Practice
671 Human Factors

693

Research Apprenticeship MA
693A Research Apprenticeship MA
693B Research Apprenticeship MA
696 Master's Thesis Guidance
697 Master's Topic Paper Guidance
698A Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)
698B Master's Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)
705 Statistical Methods I
706 Statistical Methods II
707 Hierarchical Linear Modeling
709 Historical and Biological Foundations
710 Cognitive and Social Foundations
712 Seminar in Cognitive Disabilities
714 Introduction to Neuropsychology
715 Neuropsychological Assessment
726 Personality
728 Cognitive & Neuropsychological Approaches to Human Memory
729 Contemporary Approaches to Group Psychotherapy
733 Contemporary Psychodynamic Therapy & Practice
735 Developmental Psychopathology
745 Cognitive and Behavior Therapy
759 Cognitive Neuroscience
777 Psychology of Emotions
780 Applied Memory Research
792 Readings in Psychology
792A Readings in Psychology
792B Readings in Psychology
793 Research Apprenticeship for PhD
795 Psychology Internship
807 Clinical Assessment of Children and Adolescents
810 Psychotherapy with Children: Concepts and Applications
811 Research Methods in Psychology
812 Family Therapy: Theory & Practice
813 Psychopathology
820 Clinical Psychopharmacology
830 Cultural Issues in Clinical Psych
840 Ethics and Professional Issues
852 Principles of Development
879 Human Performance Systems
883 Applied Cognitive Psychology
895 Externship
901 Clinical Assessment I: Principles of Assessment, Interviewing
902 Clinical Assessment II: Intelligence Testing
903 Laboratory in Clincal Assessment II
906 Personality Assessment: Projective Methods
907 Practicum Individual Psychotherapy
908 Practicum Individual Psychotherapy
912 Personality Assessment: Self-Report Method
914 Practicum in Assessment
915 Practicum in Assessment
916 Practicum in Assessment
921 Psychotherapy: Research & Methods
927  Observation of Family Therapy
928 Practicum in Family Therapy I
929 Practicum in Family Therapy II
930 Intensive Practicum in Family Therapy
970 Advanced Clinical Training
971 Advanced Clinical Training
972 Advanced Clinical Training
995 Clinical Internship
996 Dissertation Guidance
998A Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/Classes)
998B Doctoral Comprehensive Examination (w/o Classes)

 

Department of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures

Professor Rev. Sidney H. Griffith, S.T.
Associate Professor Edward M. Cook, Chair
Assistant Professor Andrew D. Gross
Adjunct Associate Professor Janet A. Timbie
Lecturer Shawqi Talia
Lecturer Monica J. Blanchard

The Department of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures embodies CUA's historical commitment to integrate religious studies with the arts and sciences. From the beginning, the study of biblical and Christian Near Eastern languages and literatures has been part of the university's curriculum. Graduate programs in Semitic and Coptic languages and biblical and Near Eastern antiquities were formally established in 1895. Two years later the department was founded in the School of Arts & Sciences by Monsignor Henri Hyvernat, the first professor chosen for CUA.

Major programs (M.A. and Ph.D.) in ancient Northwest Semitic languages (hereinafter ANWSL), with a concentration in Hebrew and Aramaic, furnish the linguistic training and other auxiliary studies needed for a scholarly grasp of the texts of the Jewish and Christian Holy Scriptures in their historical and cultural contexts. Major programs (M.A. and Ph.D.) in early Near Eastern Christian languages and literatures (hereinafter NECLL), with concentrations in Syriac, Coptic and Arabic, offer future scholars the opportunity to acquire advanced first-hand knowledge and interpretation of the Christian literatures of the Near East in their historical and cultural settings, including Christian interactions with Muslims especially in the early Islamic period. The department's commitment to research and instruction in the languages, literatures and history of the Christian Near East is unique in this country, and it is one of the few academic centers where such studies are actively pursued.

The department provides instruction supportive to programs in other departments and schools, primarily programs in biblical studies and theology in the School of Theology and Religious Studies and the interdisciplinary graduate program administered by the Center for the Study of Early Christianity. In addition, the department cooperates with the Schools of Theology & Religious Studies and of Philosophy and the Departments of History and Anthropology in the School of Arts & Sciences in the area of early Islamic studies. The facilities of the department are available to all qualified research workers. These facilities include the library, manuscripts and collection of Oriental antiquities of the Institute of Christian Oriental Research, founded by Monsignor Hyvernat.

Course Requirements. Thirty semester credit hours are required for the M.A. The thirty credit hours must include nine in the student's major language beyond the introductory course or courses. The thirty credit hours must also include at least six credit hours, beyond the introductory course or courses, in a second Semitic language (or Coptic) judged by the faculty to be the most necessary for effective work in the student's major field. Up to six credit hours of Greek (beyond the elementary level) may be counted towards the M. A. requirements but not for major or minor language credit. ANWSL students may take history or language courses (including Syriac, Arabic and Coptic) from the NECLL program; NECLL students may take history and language courses (including Hebrew and Aramaic) from the ANWSL program. In addition to these thirty semester credit hours, the M.A. student must select (with the approval of the chair) two papers written for courses (completed with a grade of B or better) requiring a major research paper. After the courses are completed, the student must revise the papers if necessary and resubmit them to the major professor and to an additional reader for approval.

Students who wish to pursue a program combining aspects of both major programs are urged to consult in advance with all relevant faculty. The Ph.D. program incorporates the M.A. curriculum and requires an additional thirty semester hours of coursework (i.e. 60 total hours). Students who enter at the Ph.D. level must meet the full 60-hour requirement by coursework or transfer credit.

Transfer of relevant graduate credits earned at other accredited institutions is permitted in accordance with the university's regulations. Students entering at the M. A. level may transfer up to 6 credit hours; those entering at the Ph. D. level may transfer up to 24 credit hours.

Students are expected to maintain a good overall standing in the program; students who do not do so will be subject to faculty review and dismissal, if warranted. In particular, a student who receives one C may be subject to faculty review and may be placed on probationary standing in the program. A second C may lead to dismissal. A student may repeat a course in which the grade of C was earned, and the grade of the retake may replace the C; this can only be done once and must be done in consultation with the faculty.

Ph.D. students are encouraged in addition to take two courses, ordinarily six credits, outside the department with the consultation of the adviser and the chair. The courses should complement the student's interests and be adjusted to his or her background and training. The requirement may be fulfilled by courses at the graduate or advanced undergraduate level. The courses can be taken in a variety of departments and programs, including biblical studies, theology, early Christian studies, English, modern languages, comparative literature, history, economics and politics. The student may propose any courses at CUA that fit into his or her program. The courses may be taken in one or more departments. Courses offered elsewhere in the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area or at The Johns Hopkins University; the University of Maryland, College Park; or other neighboring schools may be considered.

Language Requirements. Students in the NECLL program are required to take six credits of Greek or be able to demonstrate an equivalent competence. Students in the ANWSL program are also encouraged to meet this requirement. A reading knowledge of French and German is strongly recommended from the beginning of graduate studies. All M.A. candidates must successfully complete the modern language qualification examination in one of these languages before registering for comprehensive examinations. Ph.D. candidates must successfully complete examinations in both French and German.

Comprehensive Examinations. M.A. degree candidates must, with the permission of the department chair, register for M.A. comprehensive examinations in their major and minor languages. Ph.D. candidates must, with the permission of the department chair, register for doctoral comprehensive examinations in their major and minor language areas. All degree candidates, whether M.A. or Ph.D., must register for the comprehensive examinations before the beginning of the semester in which they will take the examinations. These examinations must be passed before work on the Ph.D. dissertation can begin.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

SEM Course Title
502 History of the Ancient Near East from Abraham to New Testament Times
503 History of the Christian Near East I
505 History of Christians in the Islamic Near East
511 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew
512 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew
517 Intermediate Readings in Biblical Hebrew
521 Introduction to Aramaic
522 Introduction to Aramaic
531 Introduction to Syriac I
532 Introduction to Syriac II
533 Basic Syriac
541 Introduction to Arabic
542 Introduction to Arabic
543 Basic Arabic
545 Arabic Literature I
546 Arabic Literature II
547 Arabic Literature in Translation
551 Introduction to Classical Ethiopic
552 Introduction to Classical Ethiopic
611 Biblical Hebrew Prose I
612 Biblical Hebrew Prose II
613 Mishnaic Hebrew
622 Biblical Aramaic
631 Syriac Literature
632 Syriac Literature
641 Readings in Islamic and Christian Arabic
642 Readings in Islamic and Christian Arabic
651 Readings in Classical Ethiopic
652 Readings in Classical Ethiopic
661 Introduction to Akkadian
662 Introduction to Akkadian
681 Introduction to Coptic Studies
682 Introduction to Coptic Studies
683 Basic Coptic  
702 History of the Ancient Near East from Abraham to New Testament Times  
703 History of the Christian Near East  
705 History of Christians in the Islamic Near East
706 Northwest Semitic Inscriptions
707 Ugaritic: Grammar and Texts
708 Ugaritic: Grammar and Texts
709 Comparative Semitic Grammar
710 Comparative Semitic Grammar
711 Biblical Hebrew Poetry I
712 Biblical Hebrew Poetry II
713 Intertestamental Hebrew (Qumran)
715 Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible
716 Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible
717 Seminar in Biblical Hebrew
718 Seminar in Biblical Hebrew
719 Historical Hebrew Grammar
721 Qumran Aramaic
722 Qumran Aramaic
723 Aramaic Dialects
724 Aramaic Dialects
731 Seminar in Syriac Patristics
732 Seminar in Syriac Patristics
741 Seminar in Arabic
742 Seminar in Arabic
761 Reading of Akkadian Texts
762 Reading of Akkadian Texts
763 Akkadian Economic, Legal, and Administrative Texts
764 Akkadian Economic, Legal, and Administrative Texts
781 Readings in Coptic
782 Readings in Coptic
783 Coptic Seminar
784 Coptic Seminar
785 Studies in Coptic Epigraphy
992 Directed Readings
996 Dissertation-Doctoral

 

Department of Sociology

Professors Sandra L. Hanson
Associate Professors Enrique S. Pumar, Chair; Rev. Donald Paul Sullins
Clinical Assistant Professor Judith Perez-Caro

Adjunt Professors

John F. Liddi; David Mutchler; Anthony Pogorelc; Florencio Riguera; Suzanne Agha

 

Founded in the mid-1890s, the Department of Sociology is one of the oldest sociology schools in the United States. Today it maintains a close professional association with the Institute for Policy Research and Catholic Studies - an active social science research center on campus. In keeping with its long academic tradition, the department offers a graduate program leading to the degree of Master of Arts designed to prepare students for careers in research and to enter doctoral programs.

The Department of Sociology curriculum is organized along three tracks or principal fields: (1) Crime and Justice Studies; (2) Global and Comparative Processes; and (3) Public Policy Analysis. Students not interested in any of these three tracks may work with the faculty in their area of interest. The master's degree requires 30 semester hours of graduate work, six of which can be fulfilled by writing an M.A. thesis. For this option students register twice for Thesis Guidance and present a topic for approval by the Department and the Dean. Six credits will be awarded when the approved thesis is deposited. Through our training in advanced quantitative methods, students become experts at using statistical procedures and software. These skills are highly sought by researchers at the University's own distinguished research institutes as well as by business and research centers throughout the Washington, D.C. area and elsewhere.

As an alternative to the thesis, two journal quality seminar papers, approved by a faculty mentor,  may be submitted. Students finishing their M.A. course work must pass a comprehensive examination. There is no language requirement for the M.A.

Candidates for the M.A. must fulfill the following core requirements:

 Core Required Courses

SOC 501 Research Design and Methods 

SOC 503 Social Statistics

SOC 512 Theories of Comparative Societies 

SOC 604 Intermediate Social Statistics (or equivalent course with department approval) 

In addition to core courses, students take 18 credits of elective courses. To fulfill the requirements for one of the tracks, students must take at least three courses within the track and pass these courses with a minimum grade of "B" or better. Majors who complete the course requirements for one or more tracks will be awarded a certificate of completion upon graduation.

Elective Courses

I. Crime, Justice and Pre-Law Track

The Crime, Justice and Pre-Law track is ideal for students interested in careers in the field of criminal justice, crime investigation, law enforcement, pre-law, national security and transnational crime.

At least one of the courses taken in this track must have an international component.

SOC 504 International Crime and Its Control

SOC 505 Sociology of Crime

SOC 509 Law and Society

SOC 510 Policing and Social Control

SOC 515 Crimes in Urban Society

SOC 517 Crime and Its Control: a Survey of Crime and Delinquency

SOC 520 Analysis of Terrorism Here and Abroad

SOC 522 Sociology and the Military

SOC 524 Minority Relations

SOC 535 Crime Prevention: Implementation and Evaluation

SOC 550 Applied Policy Research

SOC 565 Keeping America's Borders Safe

SOC 571 Social Deviance

SOC 607 Survey of Violent Crime

SOC 608 Terrorism and Religion

II. Global and Comparative Processes Track

The Global and Comparative Processes track serves students with an interest in international affairs, non-profit organizations, and public service.

SOC 506 Sociology of the Family

SOC 516 Policies of PovertyEradication

SOC 520 Analysis of Terrorism Here and Abroad

SOC 522 Military Sociology

SOC 524 Minority Relations

SOC 534 Economic Sociology

SOC 538 Metropolitan Regions

SOC 540 Catholic Social Justice Doctrines

SOC 541 Religion and Society

SOC 549 Globalization andSocial Fragmentation

SOC 550 Applied Policy Research

SOC 551 Social Inequalities

SOC 560 Political Sociology

SOC 561 Migration and Development

SOC 563 Modern Social Movements

SOC 573 Gender, Globalization and Inequality

SOC 601 Social Organizations and Institutions

SOC 606 Theory and Research on Men in Society

SOC 608 Terrorism and Religion

SOC 623 Social Change and Comparative Development

SOC 629 Death, Society and the Human Experience

SOC 630 European Cities

III. Public Policy Analysis Track

The Public Policy Analysis track is ideal for students interested in policy research and evaluation, social trend analysis and public administration and service.

SOC 506 Sociology of the Family

SOC 507 Advanced Sociology of Education

SOC 516 Policies of PovertyEradication

SOC 524 Minority Relations

SOC 534 Economic Sociology

SOC 536 Global Public Policies

SOC 538 Metropolitan Regions

SOC 540 Catholic Social Justice Doctrines

SOC 541 Religion and Society

SOC 545 Sports and Society

SOC 550 Applied Policy Research

SOC 551 Social Inequalities

SOC 561 Migration and Development

SOC 565 Keeping America's Borders Safe

SOC 573 Gender, Globalization and Inequality

SOC 583 Global Policies of Disability

SOC 601 Social Organization and Institutions

SOC 606 Theory and Research on Men in Society

SOC 629 Death, Society and the Human Experience

SOC 631 Social Policy Analysis and Evaluation

IV-General Electives

SOC 592/692 Directed Readings

SOC 593/693 Directed Research

SOC 594/694 Independent Study

SOC 595/695 Internship

SOC 696 Thesis Guidance

 •SOC 698 Comprehensive Exam

Footnotes