The Catholic University of America

Benjamin T. Rome School of Music

Officers of Instruction

 

Administration

Grayson Wagstaff, Ph.D.
Dean and Professor
Amy Antonelli, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor; Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Studies
Joseph A. Santo, D.M.A.
Adjunct Assistant Professor; Assistant Dean for Graduate Studies
Faculty
Sharyn Battersby, Ed.D.
Assistant Professor
John E. Bower, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor
Jay. D. Brock, M.F.A. Clinical Assistant Professor
Rick Christman, B.S. Clinical Assistant Professor
Sharon Christman, M.M.
Professor
Nikita Fitenko, D.M.A.
Associate Professor
Jody Gatwood, B.S.
Associate Professor
Stephen Gorbos, D.M.A.
Assistant Professor
Ivo Kaltchev, D.M.A.
Associate Professor
Jason Lovelace, D.M.A. Clinical Assistant Professor
Michael Mermagen, M.M.
Associate Professor
Leo Nestor, D.M.A.
Justine Bayard Ward Professor
N. Thomas Pedersen, B.M. Clinical Assistant Professor
Denise Puricelli, M.M.
Assistant Professor
David Searle, M.M.
Assistant Professor
Murry Sidlin, M.M. Professor
Andrew Earle Simpson, D.M.
Professor
Michael Vernon Smith, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Paul Taylor, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Christina Taylor Gibson, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor
Elaine R. Walter, Ph.D.
Professor
Andrew H. Weaver, Ph.D.
Associate Professor

Emeritus Faculty

Cyrilla Barr, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita
Helmut Braunlich, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus
Robert Garofalo, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus
Barbara English Maris, D.M.A.
Professor Emerita
Thomas Mastroianni, Mus.D.
Professor Emeritus
Ruth Steiner, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita

Associates of the Faculty

Emma Garmendia, Ph.D.
Director Emerita, Latin American Center for Graduate Studies in Music
Robert Stevenson, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor, Latin American Center for Graduate Studies in Music

 

Faculty Distribution

 

Chamber Music Jody Gatwood; Michael Mermagen
Conducting Leo Nestor, choral; David Searle, orchestral/opera; John Mitchell, wind ensemble; Murry Sidlin, orchestral/opera
Institute of Sacred Music

Leo Nestor, director   (Organ) Robert Grogan; Ronald Stolk; Jeremy Filsell (Composition) Leo Nestor; Steven Gorbos; Joseph Santo; Andrew Simpson (Musicology) Grayson Wagstaff; Andrew H. Weaver; Christina Taylor Gibson (Ward Method) Rev. Robert A. Skeris

Music Education Sharyn Battersby; Michael V. Smith
Musicology Grayson Wagstaff; Elaine R. Walter; Andrew H. Weaver; Esperanza Berrocal; Christina Taylor Gibson
Theory and Composition Amy Antonelli; Stephen Gorbos; Richard Miller; Joseph Santo; Andrew Simpson; Paul Taylor; Jason Lovelace;
Latin American Center for Graduate Studies in Music Esperanza Berrocal; Fabiana Bravo; Rosemarie Houghton; José Ramos Santana; Christina Taylor Gibson; Grayson Wagstaff
Bassoon Truman Harris (NSO)
Cello Michael Mermagen
Clarinet Lawrence Bocaner (NSO); Paul Cigan; Eugene Mondie (NSO)
Double Bass Ira Gold (NSO)
Flute Vanita Jones; Alice Weinreb (NSO); Michelle Cho
Guitar Joao Paolo Figueiroa
Harp [Members of the NSO or BSO available to interested students.]
Horn Robert Craven; Names Nickel; Laurel Ohlson (NSO)
Oboe Igor Leschishin; Nicholas Stovall (NSO)
Organ Robert Grogan; Ronald Stolk; Jeremy Filsell
Piano Nikita Fitenko; Ivo Kaltchev; James Litzelman; Thomas Mastroianni; José Ramos Santana; Ralitza Patcheva; Francesca Hurst
Percussion Albert Merz; Chuck Redd
Saxophone Scott Weinhold
Trombone Matthew Guilford (NSO); Barry Hearn (NSO); Craig Mulcahy
Trumpet Steven Hendrickson (NSO); Charles Daval; Graham Breedlove; Andrew Allphin
Tuba David Fedderly (BSO)
Viola Tsuna Sakamoto (NSO); Karin Brown (BSO)
Violin Jody Gatwood; Emil Chudnovsky; Amy Beth Horman
Vocal Coaching Katerina Souvorova; Henriette Lund
Mus. Theatre Coaching Marc Bryan Lilley
Staff Accompanist Nicolas Catravas
Voice Gustavo Ahualli; Fabiana Bravo; In Dal Choi; Rick Christman; Sharon Christman; Rosemarie Houghton; Kevin Strother; Arianna Zukerman
Musical Theatre

(Voice) Doug Bowles; Rachelle Fleming; Eugene Galvin; Fleta Hylton; Marc Bryan Lilley; N. Thomas Pedersen; Denise Puricelli; Dominic Traino   (Course Instructors) Jay Brock (drama/acting); Susan Hoffmann (body movement/stage deportment); Mark Horowitz (musical theatre history); James Mahady (Meisner technique); Denise Puricelli (workshops); N. Thomas Pedersen    (Dance Instructors) Pauline Grossman; Maurice Johnson; Shannon Quinn; Shawn Short

Biographies of regular full-time and selected adjunct and part-time faculty may be viewed on the School of Music Web site at http://music.cua.edu/.

 

History

The Catholic University of America has long been committed to educating musicians and scholars. In 1927, the university first began offering music courses. A music department was established in 1950 with the late John Paul as chair. Under his leadership, the department became the School of Music in 1965. The school was named the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music in the spring of 1984, in honor of alumnus, trustee emeritus and longtime friend and benefactor, the late Benjamin T. Rome. Dean Paul and his successors Thomas Mastroianni, Elaine R. Walter, Marilyn Neeley and Murry Sidlin, have shaped a school where performance and scholarship receive equal attention to benefit undergraduate and graduate students from the United States and many foreign countries. The school is fully accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music and is Washington, D.C.'s only university school of music.

Today, with some 30 distinct majors offered, music students are admitted to programs leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Music, Master of Music, Master of Music in Sacred Music, Master of Arts, Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Musical Arts and Doctor of Musical Arts in Sacred Music. Students study with an impressive faculty of artists and scholars and participate in master classes offered by some of the world's most respected performers and composers, including Renata Scotto, Thomas Stewart, André Watts, Misha Dichter, Lorin Hollander, Horacio Gutierrez and Mstislav Rostropovich. The school houses the Latin American Center for Graduate Studies in Music and the International Ward Center. The Summer Opera Theatre Company was a professional and independent company in residence at the university for more than two decades.

The Benjamin T. Rome School of Music schedules numerous concerts, recitals and special events throughout each academic year. Recent opera and musical theater productions include Verdi's La Traviata, Bellini's I Capuleti e i Montecchi, Puccini's Il Trittico and Madama Butterfly, Poulenc's Dialogues of the Carmelites, Mozart's The Magic Flute, Rodgers' and Hammerstein's Allegro and Carousel, Stein, Bock and Harnick's Fiddler on the Roof, Bernstein's West Side Story, Herman's Hello, Dolly! and Sondheim's Into the Woods. The highlight of each year is the annual spring concert benefiting the school's endowed scholarship funds. Past benefit concerts include the 1982 world premiere of Gian Carlo Menotti's Muero porque no muero, the 1984 concert conducted by honorary alumnus and friend Maestro Mstislav Rostropovich, former music director of the National Symphony Orchestra, and the 1991 world premiere of Menotti's Llama de Amor Viva.

In 1987, 1993 and 1999, student musicians traveled to Rome for a series of concerts, including performances for Pope John Paul II. Students and alumni have performed for presidents, heads of state and all the U.S. Catholic Church cardinals.

At the 2003 President's Concert, the students of the school performed Leonard Bernstein's Mass under the direction of Dean Murry Sidlin, and the university awarded the President's Medal to Michael Kaiser, president of the Kennedy Center. At the re-opening of the Kennedy Center's Opera House, Maestro Sidlin and the students were invited to perform excerpts from Bernstein's landmark work. Subsequent years have seen performances of Defiant Requiem-Verdi at Terezín, both on campus in 2004 and at the Terezín concentration camp in 2006; Benjamin Britten's War Requiem (2005); Aaron Copland's The Tender Land (2006); Leonard Bernstein's Candide (2007); and Ned Rorem's opera on Thornton Wilder's Our Town (2008). These annual performances, all under the baton of Maestro Sidlin and in connection with the annual President's Festival of the Arts, are the culmination of a week of concerts, lectures, and symposia associated with the theme for that year. More than 2,000 music alumni have won many awards and maintain high professional visibility on six continents as performers, music educators, composers, liturgical musicians and scholars. Among those who have received national and international recognition are tenor John Aler, who won Grammy Awards for recordings of Handel's Semele (best opera) and Bartok's Cantata Profana (best classical album); and soprano Harolyn Blackwell, who received critical acclaim for her Metropolitan Opera debut performances opposite Luciano Pavarotti in Donizetti's opera La Fille du Régiment. Graduates perform with the Metropolitan Opera, Vienna Opera, Glyndebourne Festival, New York City Opera and other major symphony orchestras throughout the United States.

The school remains the preeminent Catholic center for music study in this country and is recognized for perpetuating the Church's historical role in uplifting the human spirit through the study and performance of music. The Institute of Sacred Music integrates the comprehensive study of music with the worlds of liturgical, theological, classical and humanistic studies. The school welcomes applications from women and men of character, intelligence, motivation and talent, regardless of race, creed, nationality, ethnic background or physical handicap.

Goals

The Benjamin T. Rome School of Music serves the cultural needs of the Church, nation and region through the training of men and women by an outstanding faculty of artists/scholars. Together, faculty and students are creatively engaged in research, performance, composition and teaching, always striving "? to find cultural treasures both old and new?." Through its comprehensive graduate and undergraduate programs, the school is committed to excellence. The school provides a liberal education for undergraduates and the finest professional training for all its students. It is committed to graduate education and offers the highest quality instruction to assist in the preparation of creative artists and teachers who upon graduation take their place as leaders in the world community. Of special importance is the Latin American Center for Graduate Studies in Music, the only such center in the United States that offers a minor in Latin American music within the graduate degree programs. In addition to the training of artists and scholars through the Institute of Sacred Music, the school directly serves the Church by training liturgical musicians to assume leadership within the parishes, seminaries and dioceses of the world. The school strengthens the Church and the nation by developing leaders in music education capable of awakening cultural appreciation and values in the students of parochial and public school systems.

The school offers the university community opportunities to participate in its performing organizations and concerts. It provides humanities and elective courses in music to all students in the university and seeks to collaborate further in interdisciplinary studies. It also serves the campus community as a resource when needed for official functions. Convinced that the school contributes "to the development of Christian culture and human progress," it consistently provides the campus and this nation with musical activities that reflect the excellence of the school and the university, further demonstrating the commitment to the arts held traditionally by the Church. (Quotations are from the Apostolic Constitution of the Supreme Pontiff John Paul II on Catholic universities, Aug. 15, 1990.)

Institute of Sacred Music

The Institute of Sacred Music at the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music of The Catholic University of America integrates the comprehensive study of music with the worlds of sacred and liturgical, theological, classical and humanistic studies. Degree programs at the graduate level (M.M. and advisory in sacred music) are offered, as is nondegree study of music at every level of development. The institute prepares its participants for careers in the arena of sacred music and develops those already engaged in the field.

The institute affords coursework during the academic year and in summer-study, year-round and weekend seminars. The schedule of the institute accommodates the working professional and aspirant in the field of sacred music, offering late afternoon, evening and weekend study. Balance among academic studies, professional skills, creativity and performance characterize the institute at CUA.

The institute draws faculty from the disciplines of the entire university as well as professional practitioners in the metropolitan Washington area, the nation, and Europe.

Latin American Center for Graduate Studies in Music

The Latin American Center for Graduate Studies in Music was founded in 1984 at the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music on the campus of The Catholic University of America. The center promotes the study, research and performance of Ibero-American music. It fosters the exchange of students, scholars, performers, composers, musicologists and music educators between Ibero-American countries, North America and the Caribbean region. The center houses a specialized library of scores, books and recordings of Ibero-American music. Through this center, musicians from the Americas come together with the essence of their own cultures to investigate, exchange, develop, perfect and promulgate their musical knowledge and gifts toward better understanding through mutual respect of the peoples and arts of our hemisphere.

The Latin American Center for Graduate Studies in Music has developed a visiting professorship program by accepting scholars and professors from the Americas and Spain to research and offer lectures and performances.

The Benjamin T. Rome School of Music offers master's and doctoral degree programs with concentration in the music of Latin America, with each program requiring courses, performance and research in Latin American music. For each degree program that follows, the difference between the regular curriculum and the curriculum for students concentrating in Latin American music is summarized.

Graduate Programs

Master's Programs

The school of music offers the degree Master of Arts with program in Musicology and a joint degree in Music Librarianship: Master of Arts with program in Musicology and the Master of Science in Library Science.

The school of music offers the degree Master of Music with programs in Composition (with emphasis in concert or stage music); Piano Pedagogy; Vocal Pedagogy; Chamber Music, Orchestral Instruments*; Piano Performance; Vocal Accompanying; Vocal Performance; Orchestral Conducting.

The school of music offers the degree Master of Music in Sacred Music (see Institute of Sacred Music).

The school of music offers a Graduate Artist Diploma Program (cello, orchestral conducting, piano, violin or voice) and a Music Teacher Certification Program (nondegree).

* Violin, viola, cello, string bass, orchestral woodwind and brass, percussion, harp, and classical guitar.

Admission: The following are required for admission to the master's degree programs:

1. A bachelor's degree with a major in music from an accredited institution. A student with a Bachelor of Arts degree may be accepted only after meeting the equivalent requirement for the Bachelor of Music degree at The Catholic University of America, either by taking advanced standing examinations or by completing the additional undergraduate courses.

2. Submission of an application, transcripts, and two letters of recommendation. Also to be included is a statement of purpose, a 500-700 word essay stating one's purpose for undertaking graduate study in music, one's academic objective, research interests and career plans, as well as related qualifications, such as collegiate, professional, and community activities, and any other substantial accomplishment not already mentioned on the application form.

3. At least a B average in all undergraduate music courses.

4. A 10-minute demonstration of performance proficiency with classical repertoire in contrasting styles in the applicant's major medium, either by personal audition or recording. Some degree programs also require an entrance recital (see individual programs). Students applying to the Master of Arts program should submit an original research paper on any topic in lieu of a proficiency audition. The paper should demonstrate facility with scholarly sources, the ability to formulate an original argument, and solid writing skills. Students applying to the composition program should submit original compositions in lieu of a proficiency audition.

Placement Examinations: Incoming graduate students are required to take a Music History Placement Examination and Theory Placement Examination (which has two parts, a harmony and an aural skills section) before initial registration is completed. These examinations are taken only once. If the results indicate areas of deficiency, the student must remove these deficiencies by taking specified graduate review courses (see below) or undergraduate courses. These courses do not count toward degree requirements. The applicant is expected to take the placement examinations at the beginning of the semester in which he/she has been admitted to the music school. For serious reasons, the adviser may grant permission to postpone to the second semester of residency, but normally not beyond. Placement examinations are given during the fall and spring semester registration periods.

Several master's degree programs have additional admission requirements; these are listed below under the individual degree programs. Where additional requirements are not listed, admission to the degree program is granted upon successful completion of the general admission requirements listed above.

Graduate Review courses: As explained above, incoming graduate students must take the Music History Placement Examination and Theory Placement Examination before their first semester of classes. If the results of the Theory Placement Exam warrant placement into the Graduate Harmony Review course (MUS 491) and/or the Graduate Aural Skills Review course (MUS 492) or the results of the Music History Placement Exam warrant placement into the Graduate Music History Review course (MUS 490), the student must fulfill these courses within a year of having taken the exams. 

Handbook for students in the school of music: Students are to consult the online Handbook found at http://music.cua.edu/handbook/index.cfm for music school forms and procedures not detailed in these Announcements.

Performance juries: Degree requirements for many of the master's degree programs include performance juries (major, principal and secondary) and a degree recital. Composition juries: All students enrolled in applied composition are required to submit samples of their work to a jury of the composition faculty for evaluation at the end of the semester.

Private instruction and degree recital: Students must be registered for private instruction during the semester in which the degree recital is performed.

M.M. degree programs requiring concerto, chamber music, and/or vocal accompanying performances: The student must register for the appropriate MUS numbers according to the student's degree program.  Please consult the curriculum for the specific MUS numbers.  If there will be no faculty member, private instructor, or advser present at the above performances, for evaluation purposes, the student must submit to his/her adviser within 24 hours of the performance a video recording with sound of the entire performance along with the official printed program.

Location of degree recital: Master's recitals and related required performances must normally be performed on campus. Exceptions require consultation with advisor and with dean's permission. Polices and procedures pertaining to degree recitals, whether on or off campus, may be found in the School of Music Handbook http://music.cua.edu/handbook/index.cfm.

Independent Study: Other than students in the Professional Studies track or in cases approved by the dean, graduate students should take no more than one-sixth of the total credit hours in their program of graduate studies as Independent Study. (This refers to graduate level courses, not undergraduate prerequisites that may have to be fulfilled.)

GPA minimum required for graduation: For students in graduate programs, an average of B (3.0 cumulative GPA) or better is required for graduation. A graduate student who has received a grade of C or F in a graduate course is permitted to repeat the course one time. The calculation of the grade point average will include only the grade earned in the repeated course.

Part-time faculty and private instruction: Part-time faculty members teaching private instruction are appointed at an hourly rate by the university. Study with part-time applied faculty is subject to their availability, and some part-time applied faculty teach off campus. Students studying with a part-time faculty member may be required to pay an additional studio rate.

For the Master of Music programs in Performance, please note: In particular circumstances where the candidate is actively engaged in a recognized performance career and either represented by artist management or affiliated with a professional organization of acceptable status, the Master of Music degree programs that follow may be offered with special and individualized study options by permission of the dean and the cognizant performance area chair/committee.

Addition to general university policies regarding full-time study: The master's degrees in the school of music are subject to university policies regarding full-time study, as outlined under the heading Enrollment in the General Information section of the Graduate Announcements, with the following addition:  1. enrollment for master's graduate recital and at least one credit of private instruction (limit four semesters).

Overelection: The normal maximum course load for a full-time graduate student in the school of music is 15 credit hours per semester. Overelection is not allowed except in extraordinary circumstances and only with permission of the dean. Unless approved by the dean of the school of music, teaching or research assistants may not enroll for more than nine semester hours per semester, depending upon the number of hours of teaching or research per week required by their appointments.

Participation in productions: Music students derive benefit from participation in many aspects of the management and production of performances. Students may, as part of their educational experience, be assigned various duties in the production of operas, musical theater productions and orchestral, choral and chamber music concerts.

 

Master of Arts Degree

MUSICOLOGY

The student's bachelor's degree program must include at least 18 semester hours in music theory and six semester hours in music history. Any deficiencies must be made up in the first year.

Program of Study Semester Hours
Two Musicology Period Courses 6
Research Methodology MUS 731 3
Analytical Techniques I, II  MUS 711, 712 6
Two Seminars MUS 720 6
Music Elective 3
Research Guidance (for thesis) MUS 995 6
Musicology Colloquium MUS 599 (599A) 0
Total: 30

*Upon approval of the written thesis, six semester credit hours will be posted to the student's academic record and will be counted toward the total number of semester credit hours required for the master's degree program.

Graduation Requirements

A thesis on some subject in the field of music history is required for completion of the degree. The candidate must pass one modern foreign language examination, normally German or French. Successful completion of a comprehensive examination (COMP 598-01 w/classes; COMP 599-02 w/o classes) in the major field also is required. The student may schedule the comprehensive examination following the adviser's written approval. For more specific information about language requirements, thesis and comprehensive examinations, the candidate is referred to the section master's and licentiate degrees found in the general section of these Announcements.

Minor in Latin American Music

Requirements listed above apply, with the following exceptions:

1. Six semester hours of Latin American music electives replace music electives.

2. Graduation requirements: the thesis topic must be in the area of Latin American music.

Please note that the school of music is not accepting applications for the emphasis in Music Theory.

Joint-Degree Program in Music Librarianship

Entrance Requirements

Applicants seeking admission to the joint M.A. in Musicology/M.S. in Library Science degree program will be required to fulfill the admission requirements of the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music and the School of Library and Information Science, as published in their current Announcements. Among the requirements for admission to the music school is the submission of a research paper on a musicological subject. In addition, students will be required to take a music theory placement examination and to make up any deficiencies so identified by taking one or more graduate review courses before being admitted to graduate courses in music theory. All entering students must also take a music history placement exam and make up any deficiencies with a graduate music history review course. A student who is admitted to the M.S. in L.S. program but not to the M.A. can choose to matriculate only in the School of Library and Information Science; however, a student admitted only to the M.A. and not to the M.S. in L.S. cannot matriculate in the School of Music without obtaining permission from the musicology faculty, which usually requires the submission of additional application materials.

Program of Study

The joint-degree program requires a total of 51 graduate semester hours of credit in the two disciplines: 21 hours in music and 30 hours in library and information science.

  Semester Hours
Music Librarianship  
Library Science Basic Courses 12
LSC 551 Organization of Information 3
LSC 553 Information Sources an Services 3
LSC 555 Information Systems in Libraries and Information Centers 3
LSC 557 Libraries and Information in Society 3
Library Science Specialty Courses 9
LSC 831 Music Bibliography 3
LSC 833 Music Librarianship 3
LSC 906 Practicum (in music librarianship) 3
Library Science Electives (by advisement) 9
Comprehensive Examinations (see below) 0
 Total: 30 
   
M.A. in Musicology  
MUS 711 Analytical Techniques I 3
MUS 712 Analytical Techniques II 3
MUS 731 Research Methodology 3
MUS 720 Seminar in Music History and/or Theory Topics 3
Music History Period Courses 9
Comprehensive Examinations (see below) 0
Total: 21

Graduation Requirements

The successful completion of a foreign language examination is required for the M.A. degree in music.

Comprehensive examinations are required for both the M.A. and the M.S. in L.S. degrees. The music comprehensive examination (COMP 598-01 w/classes; COMP 599-02 w/o classes) will include three hours in music history and one hour in analytical techniques. Degrees are awarded simultaneously upon completion of the requirements for both degrees.

A student can choose to withdraw from the M.A. program and still receive the M.S. in L.S. degree; however, a student who withdraws from the M.S. in L.S. program cannot continue in the M.A. and must reapply for the M.A. program in musiciology if he/she wishes to complete the degree.

Minor in Latin American Music

This joint degree program is not offered with a minor in Latin American music.

 

Master of Music Degree

 

COMPOSITION

Concert Music Emphasis

Entrance Requirements

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to the music school, a student who desires to major in composition, concert music emphasis, must submit original compositions for evaluation. A student whose major for the undergraduate degree was something other than composition must show evidence of having completed the equivalent of the requirements of an undergraduate composition major. Any deficiencies must be made up by taking the necessary undergraduate courses or by passing proficiency examinations.

Students whose baccalaureate programs exhibit significant curricular deficiencies may be required to take remedial courses to satisfy these deficiencies as prerequisites to the master's program. Remedial courses may be taken concurrently with courses in the master's program.

All students enrolled in applied composition instruction are required to submit samples of their work to a jury of the composition faculty for evaluation at the end of the semester.

Program of Study Semester Hours
Composition 6
Composition Seminar MUS 629

2

Research Methodology MUS 731 3
Analytical Techniques I, II  MUS 711, 712 6
Music History Elective 3
Advanced Counterpoint MUS 714 3
Advanced Orchestration MUS 581 3
Twentieth-Century Music MUS 537E 3
Music Electives 6
Recital MUS 940 0
Total: 35

Graduation Requirements

1. As a thesis, the student must deposit a score of an extended work for orchestra or large instrumental ensemble.

2. Successful completion of comprehensive examinations (COMP 598-01 w/classes; COMP 599-02 w/o classes) is also required. The student may schedule the comprehensive examinations following the adviser's written approval.

Minor in Latin American Music

Requirements listed above apply, with the following exceptions:

1. Six semester hours of Latin American music electives replace the music history elective (three semester hours) and three of the six semester hours of music electives.

2. The final composition must be related to Latin American music.

Stage Music Emphasis

Entrance Requirements

A student seeking admission to the Master of Music degree program in composition, stage music emphasis, must have earned a bachelor degree in music composition, or a bachelor degree in music that preferably includes a strong compositional component. The prospective student must also submit a representative portfolio of compositions for review by the composition committee. The prospective student's portfolio should include at least some examples of concert works such as instrumental solo and chamber music and orchestral or wind ensemble music. Recordings (not MIDI realizations) of the portfolio compositions, if available, are strongly encouraged. All entering graduate students in the Master of Music degree program in composition must take the Theory Placement Examination. Details and dates are available in the music school office.

Students whose baccalaureate programs exhibit significant curricular deficiencies may be required to take remedial courses to satisfy these deficiencies as prerequisites to the master's program.  Remedial courses may be taken concurrently with courses in the master's program.

All students enrolled in applied composition instruction are required to submit samples of their work to a jury of the composition faculty for evaluation at the end of the semester.

Program of Study Semester Hours
Composition 9
Composition Seminar MUS 629 4
Research Methodology MUS 731 3
Advanced Orchestration MUS 581 3
Stage Music Practicum MUS 617 3
Topics in Stage Music MUS 555 3
Music Theory/History (by advisement): 6
     History of Opera MUS 553  (3)
     Analytical Techniques I MUS 711  (3)
     Analytical Techniques II MUS 712  (3)
     Twentieth Century Music MUS 537E  (3)
     Advanced Counterpoint MUS 714  (3)
     History of Jazz Through Analysis MUS 665  (3)
     Survey of American Song MUS 707  (3)
     Introduction to Music Notation Software MUS 573  (3)
Theatre, Film, or Dance History (graduate level): 3
     Playwriting I DR 565  (3)
     Western Theatre/Culture I DR 603  (3)
     Modern European Drama DR 605  (3)
     Twentieth Century Theatres DR 610  (3)
     The Rhetoric of Advertising MDIA 524  (3)
     The Rhetoric of Propaganda MDIA 530  (3)
Piano (if necessary) 0
Applied Study Elective (audition required) 2-3

Performance/Production MUS 940 (see below)

0
Total: 34 (36-37)

Graduation Requirements

1. A public performance/production (MUS 940, 0 cr) featuring the student's original music, in context, in one or more of the following genres:

  • opera (workshop);

  • musical (workshop);

  • incidental music for a dramatic production;

  • music for dance (ballet, modern, jazz, folk);

  • performance art piece

A minimum of 30 minutes of fully composed music is required (improvised music is not included in this total).

More than one work may be necessary in order for this minimum time to be reached. The graduation recital is subject to the approval of the composition committee, based upon submission of the complete musical score (or, in the case of non-notated, electronic music, the complete edited recorded version of the music) at least 30 calendar days prior to the recital date. The composition committee must approve the graduation recital program in order for the student to receive credit. As far as possible, the music school will assist the student in assembling the requisite personnel and facilities for the graduation recital. However, it is ultimately the student's responsibility to assemble and present the graduation recital.

2. Successful completion of comprehensive examinations (COMP 598-01 w/classes; COMP 599-02 w/o classes) is also required. The student may schedule the comprehensives examinations following the adviser's written approval.

Minor in Latin American Music

This degree program is not offered with a minor in Latin American music.

ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING

Entrance Requirements

The applicant must demonstrate prior experience in conducting orchestral ensembles. The student must meet the general requirements for admission to the music school, complete a music history placement examination and a music theory placement examination, and pass an entrance audition on campus with the CUA Symphony Orchestra. In addition, an examination (both written and aural) and interview with faculty audition committee are required. In cases where all of the above cannot be undertaken due to time or distance constraints, every effort will be made to evaluate the candidate as fairly as possible, by viewing a video or live rehearsal and scheduling an interview by telephone. First consideration will be given to candidates who audition in person. This is a select program and the above procedure is used when there are openings for candidates.

Program of Study Semester Hours
Applied Conducting 6
Graduate Conducting Seminar I, II*  MUS 643/644 6

Practicum in Sight Singing, Score Reading, & Analysis for Conductors** MUS 622A

0
Performing Ensemble 2
Core Electives (suitable Electives include): 6
     The Musician in Modern Society (2) MUS 506  
     Music in the Baroque (3) MUS 537B  
     Music in the Classical Period (3) MUS 537C  
     Music in the Romantic Period (3) MUS 537D                                                                              
     Twentieth-Century Music (3) MUS 537E  
     History of Opera (3) MUS 553  
     History of Orchestration (3) MUS 632  
     History of Jazz Through Analysis (3) MUS 665  
     Schenkerian Analysis, I, II (3,3) MUS 715, 716  
     The Symphony I, II, III (3) (3) (3) MUS 753, 754, 755  
     Tone Poems of Richard Strauss (3) MUS 726  
Analytical Techniques I, II  MUS 711, 712 6
Research Methodology MUS 731 3
Music History Elective 3
Internship/Field Experience for Orchestral Conductors (see below) MUS 645 0
Recital MUS 902 3
Total 35

* If a student stays at CUA past one year working on the Master's degree in Orchestral Conducting, it is expected that he/she take the Graduate Conducting Seminar every semester in residence.

** Required every semester in residence.

Internship/Field Experience Requirements for M.M. Orchestral Conductors MUS 645 (0 credit)

1. To fulfill the requirements of the internship/field experience, the master's student will work as an assistant conductor on at least one CUA opera production and at least one CUA musical theatre production. The requirement could alternatively be fulfilled with outside organizations with the approval of the major professor. Satisfactory completion of the requirement is contingent upon approval of the major professor and a positive evaluation from the supervising/host conductor.

2. To fulfill the requirements of the internship/field experience, the master's student will also spend a minimum of two semesters of work as an assistant conductor/intern for an approved outside ensemble. The orchestral conducting division will assist the student in finding a suitable placement with an outside organization. In the event that an appropriate outside ensemble cannot be found, the student may fulfill the requirement with CUA ensembles as approved by the major professor. Satisfactory completion of the requirement is contingent upon approval of the major professor and a positive evaluation from the supervising/host conductor.

Graduation Requirement

Successful completion of a 70-minute graduation recital (MUS 902) is required. The recital is to be conducted in public before a committee of the music school faculty, and is graded on a pass/fail basis. The repertoire, to be determined with the conducting professor, should include a variety of style periods, including music written after 1920. The performing ensemble may consist of players from the CUA Symphony Orchestra or another appropriate ensemble from outside the school of music.

Minor in Latin American Music

This degree program is not offered with a minor in Latin American music.

 

 

PIANO PEDAGOGY

Entrance Requirements

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to the music school, a student who desires to major in piano pedagogy must submit a summary of all teaching experience. During the first semester of study, the student must also take a placement test in functional keyboard skills. If necessary, prerequisites may be assigned by the adviser.

Partnership with the Levine School of Music

A partnership has been established between the Levine School of Music and the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music. This partnership consists of the following:

1. Internships and Observations. Selected undergraduate and/or graduate students who are registered for 500C, Internship in Teaching Piano, and who are recommended by both CUA and Levine School of Music, LSM, faculty may be able to carry out their practice teaching at LSM. Full semester/academic year practice teaching assignments may include music sampler classes or individual lessons for scholarship students. Graduate students may be able to substitute teach more advanced students on a need basis, replacing LSM faculty on short-term leaves. Internship students will be required to do a final project related to the internship course, to be evaluated by a CUA faculty member. Opportunities for CUA students to observe teachers at the LSM are possible.

2. Credit waiver.

a. Students for whom undergraduate prerequisites in piano pedagogy are required and who have completed the LSM Diploma Program in Piano Pedagogy are eligible for waiver of up to six semester hours of credit in the same upon admission to the CUA graduate music division.

b. Courses taken within LSM's Diploma Program in Piano Pedagogy will be considered for partial credit waiver of undergraduate prerequisites pending evaluation by CUA faculty.

3. Independent Study. Independent study projects in piano pedagogy for CUA registered students may be designed in collaboration with the LSM. Reciprocal projects may be created for registered LSM students.

Program of Study

This degree program combines advanced training in theory and performance with the laboratory experience of teaching piano. The candidate's knowledge of the literature, techniques and theory of piano music is systemized and applied to the practical problems of both class and private teaching, at all levels.

Core Courses Semester Hours
Piano 6
Piano Pedagogy (includes technical skills, performance practice, graded literature, contemporary music for teaching, class piano methods) 6
Internship in Teaching Piano MUS 500C 2
Chamber Music MUS 605 1
Research Methodology MUS 731 3
Analytical Techniques II MUS 712 3
Seminar in Piano Technique or Elective in Music History 3
Piano Literature 3
Solo Recital MUS 936 2
Pedagogy Paper MUS 937 1
Total: 30

Graduation Requirements

1. A 60-minute, memorized recital of music that complements the candidate's previous repertory is to be performed in public, following successful completion of a private hearing before a committee of the music school faculty. The recital must include a pre-Bach piece, a principal work of J.S. Bach, a classical sonata or set of variations, a romantic composition, a composition of French impressionism and a contemporary work.

2. The candidate shall present to a faculty committee a research paper on an aspect of piano literature, pedagogy, pianism or the piano. The paper shall be written under the guidance of the graduate adviser in piano pedagogy and completed not later than four weeks before the end of the semester in which the student plans to graduate.

3. Students must also successfully complete a final oral comprehensive examination (COMP 598-01 w/classes; COMP 599-02 w/o classes) in piano pedagogy integrating material covered in pedagogy courses taken during the degree program.

Minor in Latin American Music

Requirements listed above apply, with the following exceptions:

1. The curriculum requires a total of 33 to 34 semester hours of credit.

2. The six semester hours of piano pedagogy are replaced by six-to-seven semester hours of piano pedagogy.

3. Six semester hours of Latin American music electives replace the three semester hours of seminar in piano technique or elective in music history.

4. In most of the courses in the curriculum, the student will have opportunities to prepare special projects on topics related to the composition, performance and teaching of piano music of Latin America.

5. A significant portion of the student's performance repertoire for juries and the final recital must consist of music by Latin American composers, and the research paper should incorporate some aspect of piano literature, piano pedagogy or pianism in Latin America.

 

VOCAL PEDAGOGY

Entrance Requirement

The student's undergraduate degree should be in voice with evidence of vocal proficiency in three languages and a senior recital.

Program of Study

This program is designed for the teacher of voice. The recommended length of study for this program is two years, although it can be completed in one year and two summers.

Foreign language prerequisites include two semesters of undergraduate study in each of the following languages: Italian, French, and German, with a grade of B or better, taken at an accredited college or university as approved by the adviser and dean. In lieu of taking undergraduate courses, students who place into Italian 103, French 103, or German 103 on the university's Modern Language Test will be considered to have satisfied the prerequisite requirement in the given language(s).

Coaching is available for graduate vocal pedagogy majors by request, in the semester in which a recital is scheduled.  Further coaching is available with permission of the adviser.  For this coaching, students pay the elective study (higher) private instruction fee.

Core Courses Semester Hours
Voice 6
Analytical Techniques II MUS 712 3
Music History Elective 3
Survey of Solo Vocal Literature MUS 511 2
Lyric Diction 3
Introduction to Vocal Pedagogy and Physiology MUS 535 2
Vocal Pedagogy Practicum MUS 535A 2
Electives (see below) 7
Solo Recital MUS 936 2
Pedagogy Paper MUS 937 1
Total: 31
Electives:  
Chorus (1,1)
Opera Practicum, Minor Role MUS 538C (1,1)
Opera Practicum, Minor Role MUS 538B (2,2)
Opera Practicum, Major Role MUS 538 (3,3)
Opera Workshop MUS 509, 509A (2,2)
Seminar in Vocal Performance MUS 661 (3,3)
Any graduate-level courses in speech and drama (max. 6)

Graduation Requirements

1. Successful completion of a memorized solo recital (MUS 936) of 60 minutes duration for a faculty committee is required.

2. The candidate shall present to a faculty committee a research paper (MUS 937) on an aspect of vocal pedagogy. The paper shall be written under the guidance of the graduate adviser in vocal pedagogy and completed not later than four weeks before the end of the semester in which the student plans to graduate

3. Students must also successfully complete a final oral comprehensive examination (COMP 598-01 w/classes; COMP 599-02 w/o classes) in vocal pedagogy integrating material covered in pedagogy courses taken during the degree program.

Minor in Latin American Music

Requirements listed above apply, with the following exceptions:

1. Six semester hours of Latin American music electives and one semester of chorus replace the seven semester hours of electives.

2. A significant portion of the student's performance repertoire for juries and the final recital must consist of music by Latin American composers, and the research paper should be related to Latin American music.

 

CHAMBER MUSIC (PIANO)

Entrance Requirements

The applicant's undergraduate degree program should be in piano performance (or the equivalent). In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to the music school, a student who wishes to major in chamber music (piano) must pass an audition before the piano faculty. This will include solo literature and chamber music, and sight reading.

Program of Study Semester Hours
Piano 6
Core Electives (see below) 12
Chamber Music (required) MUS 605 or 605A (1,1,1)
Vocal Literature (2,2)
Piano Literature (including MUS 522D) (3,3)
Chamber Music Techniques MUS 524 (3)
Research Methodology MUS 731 3
Analytical Techniques II MUS 712 3
Music in the Classical Period MUS 537C 3
Music in the Romantic Period MUS 537D 3
Total: 30
   
Core Electives:  
Chamber Music (required) MUS 605 or 605A (1,1,1)
Vocal Literature (2,2)
Piano Literature (including MUS 522D) (3,3)
Chamber Music Techniques MUS 524 (3)
Research Methodology MUS 731 (3)
Analytical Techniques II MUS 712 (3)
Music in the Classical Period MUS 537C (3)
Music in the Romantic Period MUS 537D (3)

Graduation Requirements

Two chamber music recitals (MUS 941 x2) and one piano-vocal program (MUS 941A) are required.

Minor in Latin American Music

Requirements listed above apply, with the following exceptions:

1. Among the core courses, six semester hours of Latin American music electives replace Music in the Classical Period and Music in the Romantic Period.

2. Among the core electives, electives in Latin American music may be included as appropriate and as approved by the adviser.

3. A significant portion of the student's performance repertoire for juries and recitals must consist of music by Latin American composers.

 

ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS

Entrance Requirements

The student must meet the general requirements for admission to the music school.

Program of Study Semester Hours
Private Music Instruction 6
Music History Electives 6
Ensemble (Symphony Orchestra MUS 508 and/or Wind Ensemble MUS 508B) 3
Research Methodology MUS 731 3
Analytical Techniques I, II  MUS 711, 712 6
Chamber Music MUS 605 or 605A (violin, viola, cello majors) or Music Electives (all other majors) 3
Recital MUS 902 3
Total: 30

Graduation Requirements

1. The student is required to present a graduation recital (MUS 902) of approximately 70 minutes duration. This recital is to be performed in public following successful completion of a private hearing before a recital committee, which may grant or withhold permission for public performance. In case of withholding permission, a second hearing will be granted after approval by the adviser of the program. The candidate should apply for a committee hearing at least four weeks in advance of the proposed recital date.

2. The student will also register for and publicly perform a concerto (MUS 944) and a major chamber work (MUS 944A). These performances normally will be separate from the graduation recital and must be approved by the student's faculty adviser. The required concerto normally will be accompanied by piano. The securing of the accompanist is the responsibility of the soloist. Repertoire used to satisfy the concerto and chamber music requirements may not be included in the 70 minutes of repertoire required for the graduation recital.

Minor in Latin American Music

Requirements listed above apply, with the following exceptions:

1. Six semester hours of Latin American music electives replace six semester hours of music history electives.

2. A significant portion of the student's performance repertoire for juries and recitals must consist of music by Latin American composers.

 

PIANO PERFORMANCE

Entrance Requirements

The student must meet the general requirements for admission to the music school.

Program of Study Semester Hours
Piano 6
Piano Literature 6
Piano Pedagogy (or Seminar in Piano Technique) 3
Chamber Music MUS 605 or 605A 2
Research Methodology MUS 731 3
Analytical Techniques II MUS 712 3
Music Electives 4
Recital MUS 902 3
Total: 30

Graduation Requirements

1. A solo recital (MUS 902) of 70 minutes duration is to be publicly performed from memory after approval by the candidate's instructor and after private hearing before the recital committee, which may grant or withhold permission for public performance. In case of withholding permission, a second hearing will be granted after approval by the adviser of the program. Candidates should make application for committee hearings at least four weeks in advance of the proposed recital date.

2. A concerto (MUS 943) from the standard repertory is to be memorized and performed publicly. The required concerto normally will be accompanied by piano. The securing of the accompanist is the responsibility of the soloist.

3. A chamber music performance (MUS 943A), in a public concert, of a major work for piano with strings or winds will be scheduled with approval of the candidate's instructor in ensemble. Memorization is not required.

Minor in Latin American Music

Requirements listed above apply, with the following exceptions:

1. The curriculum requires a total of 31 to 32 semester hours of credit.

2. The three semester hours of Piano Pedagogy (or Seminar in Piano Technique) are replaced by two to three semester hours of Piano Pedagogy.

3. Projects in the music of Latin America may be assigned or elected in the following curriculum areas: private piano instruction, piano literature, piano pedagogy, chamber music and recital.

4. Six semester hours of Latin American music electives replace four semester hours of electives (in music).

5. A significant portion of the student's performance repertoire for juries and recitals must consist of music by Latin American composers.

 

VOCAL ACCOMPANYING

Entrance Requirements

The applicant's undergraduate degree program should be in piano performance (or the equivalent). In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission to the music school, a student who wishes to major in vocal accompanying must pass an audition before the piano faculty. This will include solo literature and vocal repertoire, and sight reading.

Program of Study Semester Hours
Core Courses  
Piano 6
Core Electives (see below) 6
Two lyric diction courses in either
Italian (MUS 572), French (MUS 572A), or German (MUS 572B)
6
Research Methodology MUS 731 3
Analytical Techniques II MUS 712 3
Music in the Classical Period MUS 537C 3
Music in the Romantic Period MUS 537D 3
Total: 30
   
Core Electives:  
Survey in Solo Vocal Literature MUS 511, 512 (2,2)
Opera Practicum (major role) (3) MUS 538 (3)
Opera Practicum (minor role) MUS 538B (2)
Opera Practicum (minor role) MUS 538C (1)
Introduction to Vocal Pedagogy and Physiology MUS 535 (2)
Survey of German Lied MUS 702, 703 (2,2)
French Melodie MUS 704 (2)

Graduation Requirements

1. One chamber music recital (MUS 942) and three piano-vocal programs (MUS 942A x3) are required.

2. Passing satisfactorily a language examination in two languages (French, German or Italian, no substitutions) is also required.

Minor in Latin American Music

Requirements listed above apply, with the following exceptions:

1. Among the core courses, six semester hours of Latin American music electives replace Music in the Classical Period and Music in the Romantic Period.

2. Among the core electives, electives in Latin American music may be included as appropriate and as approved by the adviser.

3. A significant portion of the student's performance repertoire for juries and recitals must consist of music by Latin American composers.

 

VOCAL PERFORMANCE

Entrance Requirements

After completing the general admission requirements to the music school, a student who wishes to major in vocal performance must successfully complete an entrance recital of approximately 60 minutes duration for a faculty committee. This should include, recital lieder, art songs, and contemporary works displaying vocal proficiency in at least three languages. Graduate credits in private music instruction apply toward degree requirements beginning with the semester during which the entrance recital is passed.

The student's undergraduate degree should be in voice, although advanced standing will be considered as a result of private work.

Foreign language prerequisites include two semesters of undergraduate study in each of the following languages: Italian, French, and German, with a grade of B or better, taken at an accredited college or university as approved by the adviser and dean.  In lieu of taking undergraduate courses, students who place into Italian 103, French 103, or German 103 on the university's Modern Language Test will be considered to have satisfied the prerequisite requirement in the given language(s).

Coaching is available for graduate vocal performance majors by request, in the semester in which a recital is scheduled. Further coaching is available with permission of the adviser. For this coaching, students pay the elective study (higher) private instruction fee.

Program of Study

The recommended length of study for this program is two years, although it can be completed in one year and two summers.

Core Courses Semester Hours
Voice 6
Analytical Techniques II MUS 712 3
Music History Elective 3
Introduction to Vocal Pedagogy and Physiology MUS 535 2
Survey of Solo Vocal Literature MUS 511 2
Electives appropriate to curriculum (see below) 13
Recital MUS 902 3
Total: 32
   
Electives:  
Chorus (1,1)
Lyric Diction and Repertoire (3)
Combined Lyric Diction I,II MUS 572A, 572B (2,2)
Opera Practicum (major role) MUS 538 (3)
Opera Practicum (minor role) MUS 538B (2)
Opera Practicum (minor role) MUS 538C (1)
Opera Workshop MUS 509, 509A (2,2)
Seminar in Vocal Performance MUS 661 (3,3)
Survey in German Lied MUS 702, 703 (2,2)
History of Opera MUS 553 (3)
Stage Movement for Singers I,II MUS 536, 536A (1,1)
Vocal Pedagogy Practicum MUS 535A (2)
Any graduate language courses in German, French, or Italian (max. 6)
Any graduate-level courses in speech and drama (max. 6)

Graduation Requirement

A memorized solo public recital (MUS 902) of 70 minutes duration is required, to be presented following successful completion of a private hearing before a committee of the music school faculty.

Minor in Latin American Music

Requirements listed above apply, with the following exceptions:

1. Six semester hours of Latin American music electives replace Analytical Techniques I (three semester hours) and three semester hours of electives.

2. A significant portion of the student's performance repertoire for juries and recitals must consist of music by Latin American composers.

 

MASTER OF MUSIC IN SACRED MUSIC

Concentrations in choral music, composition, organ, voice.

Entrance Requirements

The undergraduate music degree is a prerequisite except in extraordinary circumstances. Graduate entrance examinations will be administered according to current practice.

Musical prerequisites

  • Applicants in the areas of performance (choral music, organ and vocal performance) will submit a 30-minute tape, video preferred, audio acceptable.

  • Applicants in composition will submit representative manuscripts in lieu of the audition tape.

  • Tapes and manuscripts must be sent to the Office of Graduate Admissions with all other application documents.

Invitation to campus for auditions, interviews, and testing is based on evaluation of the above materials. Applicants in organ and vocal performance concentrations will perform for the respective faculties at the time of their visit. All concentrations require an on-campus visit for testing and demonstration of conducting skills. Testing consists of demonstration of keyboard proficiency, open score-reading and sight-singing. The conducting audition is composed of two specified works with the CUA Chamber Choir and will determine placement in the conducting sequence. Auditions are held once each semester. The applicant should contact the school of music for details and dates.

Liturgical prerequisite

TRS 540, Introduction to Liturgy. Equivalency in this field may be demonstrated by written examination.

Program of Study

The program of study includes a minimum of 38 semester hours of graduate work.

  Semester Hours
Liturgical Studies 6
TRS 741A Liturgy: Theological and Historical Perspectives  3
TRS 744 Eucharist: A Liturgical Theology  3
Sacred and Choral Music 9
MUS 584 Liturgical Music  3
MUS 637 Choral Development  3
MUS 746 Seminar in Sacred Music  3
Applied Skills 9
Private Music Instruction (organ, composition, conducting, or voice)  6
MUS 638 Advanced Conducting I  3
Music History 6
MUS 556 History of Sacred Music  3
MUS 731 Research Methodology  3
Music Theory 3
MUS 712 Analytical Techniques II  3
Music Literature 3
The student must take one of the following courses according to his/her area of specialization:  
MUS 516/516A Survey of Organ Literature I/II (3,3)
MUS 640/640A/640B Choral Literature I/II/III (3,3,3)
MUS 642 Forms and Techniques in Sacred Music (3)
Music Performance: MUS 507 Chamber Choir 2
Upon completion of unit requirement, noncredit participation in CUA Chamber Choir is required each semester in residence. For this noncredit participation, the student should register for MUS 507A.  
Colloquium/Practicum in Sacred Music MUS 641 (641A w/o classes)   Enrollment is required each semester in residence. 0
Comprehensive Examinations COMP 598 w/ classes; COMP 599 w/o classes (see below) 0
Recital EXAM 598 w/ classes; EXAM 599 w/o classes  (see below) 0
Total: 38

Graduation Requirements

1--The student may schedule comprehensive examinations (COMP 598-01 w/ classes; COMP 599-02 w/o classes) following the adviser's written approval. Four two-hour examinations are administered over a two-day period: (1) liturgical studies; (2) sacred and choral music; (3) music history; and (4) music theory and music literature. The student must pass all four examinations.

2--A one-hour public recital (EXAM 598-01 w/classes; EXAM 599-02 w/o classes) in the area of concentration is required; for the composer, the submission and performance of an original work is required.

Minor in Latin American Music

Requirements listed above apply, with the following exceptions:

1. A minimum of 44 hours of graduate work is required.

2. Six semester hours of Latin American music electives are required.

3. A significant portion of the student's performance repertoire for the final recital must consist of music by Iberian or Latin American composers. For the composer, a significant portion of compositions must be works for Hispanic/Latin American liturgical needs.

Doctor of Musical Arts Degree

The Doctor of Musical Arts degree is offered to selected qualified students as a recognition of high professional attainment in composition, pedagogy, performance, or sacred music. Applicants who qualify for entrance to this program will major in one of the following areas: composition, pedagogy (piano or voice), performance (chamber music, orchestral instruments*, piano, vocal accompanying or voice), orchestral conducting, or sacred music.  *The Doctor of Musical Arts degree is not offered in the area of percussion, guitar, harp, euphonium, or saxophone.

The objective of the degree of Doctor of Musical Arts is to provide an opportunity for advanced study at the highest artistic and pedagogical level. For this reason, admission to candidacy is highly selective.

Handbook for students in the School of Music: Students should consult the online Handbook found at http://music.cua.edu/ for music school forms and procedures not detailed in these Announcements.

Placement Examinations: A Placement Examination in Music History and in Music Theory will be given to each applicant. The Placement Examinations in Music History and Music Theory are taken only once. If the results indicate areas of deficiency, the student must address these deficiencies by taking specified graduate review courses or undergraduate courses, as specified below. These courses do not count toward degree requirements. Placement examinations are given during the fall and spring semester registration periods. The applicant is expected to take the placement examinations at the beginning of the semester in which he/she has been admitted to the music school. For serious reasons, the adviser may grant permission to postpone to the second semester of residency, but normally not beyond. Note: Incoming doctoral students who are admitted after one semester of having received their master's degree from CUA do not have to retake the placement examinations.

Graduate Review courses: As explained above, incoming graduate students must take the Music History Placement Examination and Theory Placement Examination (which has two parts, a harmony and an aural skills section). If the results of the Theory Placement Exam warrant placement into the Graduate Harmony Review course (MUS 491) and/or the Graduate Aural Skills Review course (MUS 492) or the results ofthe Music History Placement Exam warrant placement into the Graduate Music History Review course (MUS 490), the student must fulfill these courses within a year of having taken the exams.

Program-Specific Entrance Examinations: Some degree programs also require program-specific entrance examinations pertaining to the applicant's intended major area. Please see the individual program for details. Program-specific entrance examinations are given during the fall and spring semester registration periods. The applicant is expected to take any required program-specific entrance examinations at the beginning of the semester in which he/she has been admitted to the music school. For serious reasons, the chair of the division may grant permission to postpone to the second semester of residency, but normally not beyond. An applicant who fails the program-specific entrance examinations may, with permission of the dean, be given a re-examination, but a third examination will not be permitted.

D.M.A. Entrance Recital: In programs that require an entrance recital, the applicant is expected to perform the entrance recital at the beginning of the semester in which he/she has been admitted to the music school. For serious reasons, the head of the division may grant permission to postpone to the second semester of residency, but normally not beyond. An applicant who fails the entrance recital may, with permission of the dean, be allowed a second recital, but a third recital will not be permitted.

Admission Process: The admission process to the doctoral programs consists of two separate steps:

1. University admission to graduate study in the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music, which includes

a. an application form (with statement of purpose* and application fee);

b. transcripts;

c. four letters of recommendation, two from teachers of the applicant and two from professional colleagues; and

d. audition: a demonstration of performance proficiency with classical repertoire in contrasting styles in the applicant's major medium (15-minute audition for piano [performance, pedagogy, chamber music, vocal accompanying] and orchestral instruments, 10-minute audition for voice [performance and pedagogy]) by in-person audition (preferred) or DVD and/or interview (when entrance recital is not required) or submission of compositions.

*The statement of purpose is a 500-700 word essay stating one's purpose for undertaking graduate study in music, one's academic objective, research interests and career plans, as well as related qualifications, such as collegiate, professional, and community activities, and any other substantial accomplishment not already mentioned on the application form.

2. Admission to degree study in the music school, which includes for each major area:

a. Composition. (i) prerequisites; (ii) four letters of recommendation (see above 1c); (iii) original compositions; (iv) and placement and entrance examinations.

b. Orchestral Conducting. (i) prerequisites; (ii) repertoire list; (iii) programs and critical reviews; (iv) description of conducting and related professional experience; (v) four letters of recommendation (see above 1c); (vi) placement examinations; and (vii) additional requirements listed in the section Doctor of Musical Arts in Orchestral Conducting.

c. Pedagogy. (i) prerequisites; (ii) repertoire and professional experience record, obtainable at: http://music.cua.edu/graduate/doctoral.cfm; (iii) programs and critical reviews; (iv) description of teaching experience; (v) four letters of recommendation (see above 1c); (vi) entrance recital; (vii) placement and entrance examinations for piano pedagogy, placement examinations for vocal pedagogy; and (viii) interview.

d. Performance. (i) prerequisites; (ii) repertoire and professional experience record, obtainable at: http://music.cua.edu/graduate/doctoral.cfm;; (iii) programs and critical reviews; (iv) description of teaching experience; (v) four letters of recommendation (see above 1c); (vi) entrance recital; (vii) placement examinations; and (viii) interview.

e. Sacred Music. (i) prerequisites; (ii) repertoire and professional experience record, obtainable at: http://music.cua.edu/graduate/doctoral.cfm; (iii) placement and entrance examinations; (iv) four letters of recommendation (see above 1c); and (v) additional requirements listed in the section Doctor of Musical Arts in Sacred Music.

Advisement: Students will be guided in their studies by an advisory committee of faculty members appointed by the dean. This committee shall

1. administer the entrance, comprehensive and final examinations;

2. submit in writing to the dean the student's program of study;

3. where appropriate, recommend to the faculty, supervise the writing of and give final approval to the student's research paper (pedagogy) or treatise (sacred music), and

4. certify to the dean the completion of curriculum, examinations and graduation requirements.

Applicants must satisfy their advisory committee that their knowledge of the field in which they propose to major is equivalent to a master's degree in that field from the music school. Areas of weakness must be strengthened by taking and passing courses of formal study assigned by the advisory committee.

Through personal interviews and evaluation of completed work, the advisory committee will assist the student in planning a program of study that will prove most advantageous to his/her particular needs, resulting in a certain amount of individual variance.

Degree Candidacy in D.M.A. programs: In the areas of composition, pedagogy and performance the student will be regarded as a degree candidate after passing the entrance examinations and/or entrance recital as required. In the area of sacred music, the student will be regarded as a degree candidate after having passed the comprehensive examinations.

Degree progress: At any point in the program of study, the advisory committee may, if convinced that the general level of the candidate's work has proven unsatisfactory, recommend to the dean that the student no longer be regarded as a degree candidate. A graduate student who has received a grade of C or F in a graduate course is permitted to repeat the course one time. The calculation of the grade point average will include only the grade earned in the repeated course. For students in graduate programs, an average of B (cumulative GPA of 3.0) or better is required for graduation.

General university policies and exceptions: The Doctor of Musical Arts degree is subject to the policies stated under the heading The Doctoral Degree in the General Information section of the Graduate Announcements, with the following exceptions:  1. The program of study in the advisory degree includes no fewer than 54 semester hours beyond the master's degree.  2. The provisions regarding the transfer of credits stated under the heading "The Doctoral Degree" in the General Information section of the Graduate Announcements do not usually apply to the D.M.A. degree. A limited number of post-master's degree credits earned at another institution at a grade level of B or better prior to the student's first enrollment at CUA may be accepted with the approval of the faculty and dean of the school.  3. For the D.M.A. degree, at least four semesters of full-time graduate work beyond the master's degree must be spent in residence at The Catholic University of America. Each semester of residence is equated with 12 semester hours of accumulated part-time study.

Addition to general university policies regarding full-time study: The doctoral degrees in the school of music are subject to university policies regarding full-time study, as outlined under the heading Enrollment in the General Information section of the Graduate Announcements, with the following addition: 1. enrollment for doctoral recitals or doctoral compositions.

Independent Study: Other than students in the Professional Studies track or in cases approved by the dean, graduate students should take no more than one-sixth of the total credit hours in their program of graduate studies as Independent Study. (This refers to graduate level courses, not undergraduate prerequisites that may have to be fulfilled.)

Overelection: The normal maximum course load for a full-time graduate student in the school of music is 15 credit hours per semester. Overelection is not allowed except in extraordinary circumstances and only with permission of the dean. Unless approved by the dean of the school of music, teaching or research assistants may not enroll for more than nine semester hours per semester, depending upon the number of hours of teaching or research per week required by their appointments.

Time limit for completion of the D.M.A.: Final degree requirements for all Doctor of Musical Arts degree programs must be completed within five years after the completion of all coursework and successful completion of comprehensive examinations where applicable.

 

COMPOSITION

Prerequisites and Entrance Requirements

The applicant must be accepted as a graduate student by the music school and must have a master's degree from an accredited institution. The applicant must submit to the advisory committee original compositions demonstrating experience and superior talent as a composer capable of independent work. A full score, plus a recording (if available), should be submitted for each composition. These compositions should normally include:

1. a major work that was the applicant's master's thesis;

2. another major work for large instrumental and/or vocal forces;

3. a chamber work; and

4. a vocal work, either for chorus or solo voice.

As stated in the Admission Process section above, four letters of recommendation, from composers or the applicant's former composition teachers.

Prior to the first semester of enrollment, the applicant will be given (1) a written placement examination in music history, (2) a written placement examination in music theory, and (3) DMA entrance examinations, consisting of two parts and given on the same day, in (a) ear training, sight singing, score reading, keyboard skills (2 hours); (b) orchestration, analysis, and counterpoint (3 hours).

Program of Study

Based on the results of the DMA entrance examinations, the advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree. The courses to be completed as part of the degree requirements will be communicated to the student in writing.

  Semester Hours
Composition (six semesters) 18
Composition Seminar MUS 629 (enrollment required each semester in residence) 0
Research Methodology MUS 731 3
Music Theory (by advisement) 12
Music History (by advisement) 9
Music Electives 12
Comprehensive Examinations (see below under Graduation Requirements) 0
DMA Composition Research Document MUS 905A (see below under Graduation Requirements) 0
DMA Composition Recital MUS 905B (see below under Graduation Requirements) 0
DMA Composition Dissertation MUS 905C (see below under Graduation Requirements) 0

Graduation Requirements

Comprehensive Examinations (COMP 698; 699 w/o classes) (written and oral; 0 semester hours).  The comprehensive examinations may be scheduled, with approval of the student's advisory committee, following the completion of coursework. The examination consists of a written and oral portion. The written portion will be scheduled during the regular university time for comprehensive examinations offered every semester. The student must schedule the oral portion of the comprehensive examination within three weeks after the successful completion of the written portion. 

DMA Research Document (MUS 905A; 0 semester hours; no grade).  The DMA document is an article-length (ca. 10,000 words, excluding footnotes and bibliography) scholarly essay of original research undertaken while in residence in the doctoral program, on a topic approved by the candidate's advisory committee.  The candidate must submit a formal DMA document proposal to the committee for approval after having been admitted to candidacy.  In order to be admitted to candidacy, the student must pass the comprehensive examinations and must be recommended by the faculty in the area of study.

DMA Composition Recital (MUS 905B; 0 semester hours; pass-fail).  The DMA recital is to be an original program of 30-45 minutes of solo and chamber music composed while in residence in the DMA Composition program.  The program is subject to approval by the student's advisory committee and must be submitted at least one month in advance of the proposed recital date.

DMA Dissertation Composition (MUS 905C; 0 semester hours; no grade).  The dissertation composition is an original work of 20-30 minutes' duration, for large ensemble, to be approved by the student's advisory committee.

Applied Study in the DMA Composition Program

With the composition advisor's permission, and by audition, a DMA student may substitute up to 12 semester hours of applied music instruction (MUPI) for music electives.  The student must be accepted for graduate-level study on the applied instrument or voice by the applied faculty, and must take a jury every semester in which credit is sought.

Minor in Latin American Music

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of Latin American music electives. The DMA research document and/or the dissertation composition should be based on Latin American subject matter.  In addition, the recital should include at least one composition related to a Latin American topic.

Minor in Musicology

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of musicology courses beyond the minimum number of hours already required for the degree. Three of those semester hours must be Research Methodology (MUS 731), unless the student has taken a similar course for the master's degree. At the conclusion of coursework, the student will take a written, four-hour minor comprehensive examination (based on four musicology courses selected by the student).

 

ORCHESTRAL CONDUCTING

Prerequisites and Entrance Requirements

The applicant must be accepted as a graduate student by the music school and must have a master's degree from an accredited institution. The applicant must also submit to the advisory committee

1. a repertoire list;

2. programs and critical reviews;

3. a complete description of conducting and related professional experience; and

4. as stated in the Admission Process section above, four letters of recommendation, including two from professional colleagues, not teachers of the applicant, attesting to the applicant's past and potential ability as a conductor.

The following entrance examination requirements must be completed successfully:

1. an entrance audition with the CUA Symphony Orchestra before a faculty committee;

2. a written examination pertaining to general knowledge of the orchestral field;

3. an aural examination;

4. an individual interview with the orchestra director;

5. Research Methodology or its equivalent;

6. written examinations (two hours each): music history placement examination and music theory placement examination.

Program of Study

The D.M.A. committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of approximately 61 to 64 semester hours beyond the master's degree. Although the program will be organized to meet the individual needs of the student, it will normally include:

  Semester Hours
Private Instruction 12
Graduate Conducting Seminar MUS 643 9
Music History and Literature 6
Music Theory and Analysis 6
Advanced Orchestration MUS 581 3
Combined Lyric Diction I and II  MUS 576A and 576B (at 2 credits each) 4
Music Electives 3-6
Internship/Field Experience for Orchestral Conductors (see below) MUS 645 0

Practicum in Sight Singing, Score Reading, and Analysis for Conductors  MUS 622 (622A without classes) (required every semester in residence)

0
Required Recitals (see below under Graduation Requirements) 18
Final Oral Comprehensive Exam (COMP 698-01 w/ classes; COMP 699-02 w/o classes) 0

Internship/Field Experience Requirements for D.M.A. Orchestral Conductors MUS 645 (0 credits)

1. To fulfill the requirements of the internship/field experience, the doctoral student will work as an assistant conductor on at least one CUA opera production and at least one CUA musical theatre production. The requirement could alternatively be fulfilled with outside organizations with the approval of the major professor. Satisfactory completion of the requirement is contingent upon approval of the major professor and a positive evaluation from the supervising/host conductor.

2. To fulfill the requirements of the internship/field experience, the doctoral student will also spend a minimum of two semesters of work as an assistant conductor/intern for an approved outside ensemble. The orchestral conducting division will assist the student in finding a suitable placement with an outside organization. In the event that an appropriate outside ensemble cannot be found, the student may fulfill the requirement with CUA ensembles as approved by the major professor. Satisfactory completion of the requirement is contingent upon approval of the major professor and a positive evaluation from the supervising/host conductor.

Graduation Requirements

Four recitals (18 semester hours). The student must present four recitals for credit. The exact nature of the first three recitals (each MUS 917; each four semester hours) is flexible and will be determined by the adviser and the student. The fourth recital must be a lecture-recital (MUS 903, six semester hours). All recitals must be approved in advance by the adviser. When feasible they should represent a diversity of performance mediums: orchestra, chorus, wind ensemble, large chamber ensemble, etc.; however, recital repertoire should reflect a high level of artistic quality, regardless of the medium. The student is required to conduct at least one substantial work from memory on one of these recitals, as approved by the adviser. Printed programs and program notes are required for all recitals.

All recitals must be videotaped. Two copies of each recital program and one videotape of each recital must be submitted to the adviser within two weeks after each recital has been performed in public. After review by the advisory committee, recital programs will be deposited in the student's academic file. The lecture-recital differs from the other degree recitals both in scope and format.

It should last approximately one hour, with no intermission. The advisory candidate should assume that it will be delivered before a group of graduate music students at a university. The topic of the lecture-recital must be approved by the adviser at least six months prior to the presentation date. During the research and writing stages, the student will meet regularly with the adviser.

The lecture-recital should reflect a balance between speaking and performing. All musical examples need not be performed live; limited use of taped examples is acceptable. In addition to the lecture-recital, the student must complete a scholarly research paper on the topic of the lecture-recital presentation. The paper must reflect a high standard of scholarship, both in research and writing, appropriate for the doctoral level. Two copies of the research paper must be submitted to the adviser.

Approval of the paper is required before the lecture/recital requirement is satisfied.

Reading proficiency examination (noncredit). The student must pass a reading proficiency examination in two languages, normally in German and Italian. With the adviser's approval, French may be substituted.

Final comprehensive oral examination (noncredit). Successful completion of a final comprehensive oral examination before a faculty committee constitutes the final requirement.

Minor in Latin American Music

This degree program is not offered with minor in Latin American music.

Minor in Musicology

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 57 to 60 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of musicology courses beyond the minimum number of hours already required for the degree. Three of those semester hours must be Research Methodology (MUS 731), unless the student has taken a similar course for the master's degree. At the conclusion of coursework, the student will take a written, four-hour minor comprehensive examination (based on four musicology courses selected by the student).

 

PIANO PEDAGOGY

Prerequisites and Entrance Requirements

Acceptance as a graduate student by the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music is required. The applicant must have extensive performance and teaching experience after receiving a master's degree from an accredited institution in piano performance.

The applicant must submit the following to the advisory committee:

1. as stated in the Admission Process section above, four letters of recommendation, including two from professional colleagues, not teachers of the applicant, attesting to the applicant's past and potential ability as a concert performer and teacher;

2. programs of performances and reviews, if available;

3. complete description of teaching experiences;

4. completed repertoire and professional experience record, obtainable at: http://music.cua.edu/graduate/doctoral.cfm.

Successful completion of the following entrance examinations is required:

1. a public recital of a program selected by the advisory committee from works on the applicant's repertoire and professional experience record;

2. private performance of a chamber music work selected by the applicant in consultation with the chair of the advisory committee;

3. private performance of a short piece designated to the applicant 24 hours in advance of the performance;

4. written examinations (two hours each): (a) music history placement examination; (b) music theory placement examination; (c) entrance examination in piano pedagogy, materials and methods, and history of the piano and piano playing; and (d) entrance examination in piano literature.

The contents of the public recital, determined by the advisory committee from repertoire proposed by the candidate, are to be communicated to the applicant by the committee not less than 30 days in advance of the recital date. The applicant is responsible for the overall quality of the performance on this and all other recitals required for the degree. Entrance recitals and placement and entrance examinations are given during the first and second semester registration periods.

Program of Study

Based on the results of the entrance examinations, the advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 55 to 72 hours beyond the master's degree. The courses and repertoire to be completed as part of the degree requirements will be communicated to the student in writing. Although the program will be organized to meet the individual needs of the student, a typical program may include:

  Semester Hours
Piano (four semesters) 12
Piano Literature 3-9
Piano Pedagogy 12
Chamber Music MUS 605 or 605A 2
Music History and Music Theory (by advisement) 12-24
Research Paper MUS 993 (3 credits); 993A (2 credits); 993B (1 credit) (directed doctoral research) 6

The research paper, on a topic approved by the D.M.A. committee, must explore in depth some aspect of piano pedagogy or literature.

 
Required Recitals (two options: see below) 8

Recital Option 1 (may be given in any order):

1. a public lecture-demonstration recital and a written document, to be approved by the advisory committee, on a topic related to piano pedagogy or performance (MUS 907 or MUS 908, 3 semester hours);

2. a public advisory pedagogy recital of solo repertoire (MUS 907 or MUS 908, 3 semester hours);

3. a public chamber music recital (MUS 912, 2 semester hours).

Recital Option 2 (may be given in any order):

1. a public lecture-demonstration recital and a written document, to be approved by the advisory committee, on a topic related to piano pedagogy or performance (MUS 907 or MUS 908, 3 semester hours);

2. two public chamber music recitals (MUS 912 and MUS 913, 2 semester hours each);

3. a public accompanying recital of vocal repertoire (MUS 914, 1 semester hour).

 
Final Comprehensive Examinations (COMP 698-01 w/classes; COMP 699-02 w/o classes) (see below) 0

The final comprehensive examinations may be scheduled, with the approval of the advisory committee, following the completion of coursework, recitals, and the research paper. They will include written examinations in piano pedagogy and literature, a teaching demonstration and an oral examination by the advisory committee.

 

Minor in Latin American Music

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 55 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of Latin American music electives. The lecture-recital (MUS 907 or MUS 908) and written document, the research paper, and research guidance will be based on a Latin American music topic. Repertoire for applied piano instruction and recitals must include a significant proportion of Latin American music. Within the pedagogy coursework, projects may be assigned that focus on Latin American music repertoire and pedagogy.

Minor in Musicology

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 55 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of musicology courses beyond the minimum number of hours already required for the degree. Three of those semester hours must be Research Methodology (MUS 731), unless the student has taken a similar course for the master's degree. At the conclusion of coursework, the student will take a written, four-hour minor comprehensive examination (based on four musicology courses selected by the student).

 

VOCAL PEDAGOGY

Prerequisites and Entrance Requirements

Acceptance as a graduate student by the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music is required. The applicant must have extensive performance and teaching experience after receiving a master's degree from an accredited institution in vocal performance.

The applicant must submit the following to the advisory committee:

1. as stated in the Admission Process section above, four letters of recommendation, including two from professional colleagues, not teachers of the applicant, attesting to the applicant's past and potential ability as a performer and teacher;

2. programs of performances and reviews, if available;

3. complete description of teaching experiences; and

4. completed repertoire and professional experience record, obtainable at: http://music.cua.edu/graduate/doctoral.cfm.

Foreign language prerequisites include two semesters of undergraduate or master's level study in each of the following languages: Italian, French, and German, with a grade of B or better, taken at an accredited college or university as approved by the adviser and dean. In lieu of taking undergraduate courses, students who place into Italian 103, French 103, or German 103 on the university's Modern Language Test will be considered to have satisfied the prerequisite requirement in the given language(s).

Successful completion of the following entrance examinations is required:

1. a public recital of a program of 60 minutes duration selected by the advisory committee from works on the applicant's repertoire and professional experience record, to include works of contrasting styles and demonstrating proficiency in at least two languages in addition to English;

2. written examinations (two hours each):

a. music history placement examination;

b. music theory placement examination.

The contents of the public recital, determined by the advisory committee from repertoire proposed by the candidate, are to be communicated to the applicant by the committee not less than 30 days in advance of the recital date. The applicant is responsible for the overall quality of the performance on this and all other recitals required for the degree. Entrance recitals and placement examinations are given during the first and second semester registration periods. An interview with the committee takes place after the examinations are completed.

Program of Study

Based on the results of the entrance examinations, the advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 58 to 72 hours beyond the master's degree. The courses to be completed as part of the degree requirements will be communicated to the student in writing. The repertoire is to be selected in conjunction with the applied music instructor and with the approval of the adviser. All degree recitals are to include appropriate program notes and translations to be approved by the applied music instructor and the adviser.

Although the program will be organized to meet the individual needs of the student, a typical program may include:

  Semester Hours
Voice (four semesters) 12
Music History and Music Theory (by advisement) 3-9
Vocal Literature 6-10
Introduction to Vocal Pedagogy and Physiology MUS 535 2
Vocal Pedagogy Practicum MUS 535A 2
Courses appropriate to the curriculum (by advisement) 9-15
Minor (see below) 12-18

An approved minor (a minimum of 12 semester hours in any one field) is required for this degree and may be taken in music theory, musicology (see below), Latin American music (see below), or in a field outside of music, such as a foreign language or English. The foreign language minor may be fulfilled not only by study of the specific language itself, but also by study of representative music history courses/seminars, poetry of song literature, and a lecture-recital, all determined by course offerings and permission from the division chair. Other specialized minors within music may be created upon the approval of the adviser and dean. The student must demonstrate the necessary undergraduate prerequisites for graduate study when the field chosen is outside of music.

 
Required Recitals MUS 907 or MUS 908 6
Research Paper MUS 993 (3 credits); 993A (2 credits); 993B (1 credit) (directed doctoral research) 6

The required research paper must be in dissertation format and must explore in depth some aspect of vocal pedagogy or literature.

 
Final Comprehensive Examinations (see below) (COMP 698-01 w/ classes; COMP 699-02 w/o classes) 0

The final comprehensive examinations may be scheduled, with the approval of the adviser, following the completion of coursework, recitals and research paper. They will include written examinations in the major and minor areas (one four-hour examination in the major area, to include vocal pedagogy and vocal literature, and one four-hour examination in the minor area-the examinations to be given on two successive days.

 
Final Recital (sixty minutes duration; 90 day program assignment) EXAM 598 w/ classes; EXAM 599 w/o classes 0

Minor in Latin American Music

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 58 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of Latin American music electives. The research paper must be based on a Latin American music topic.

Minor in Musicology

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 58 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of musicology courses beyond the minimum number of hours already required for the degree. Three of those semester hours must be Research Methodology (MUS 731), unless the student has taken a similar course for the master's degree. At the conclusion of coursework, the student will take a written, four-hour minor comprehensive examination (based on four musicology courses selected by the student).

 

 

CHAMBER MUSIC (PIANO)

Prerequisites and Entrance Requirements

Acceptance as a graduate student by the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music is required. The applicant must have extensive performance and teaching experience after receiving a master's degree from an accredited institution in piano or chamber music performance. The applicant must submit the following to the advisory committee:

1. as stated in the Admission Process section above, four letters of recommendation, including two from professional colleagues, not teachers of the applicant, attesting to the applicant's past and potential ability as a concert performer;

2. programs of performances and reviews, if available;

3. complete description of teaching experiences;

4. completed repertoire and professional experience record, obtainable at: http://music.cua.edu/graduate/doctoral.cfm.

Successful completion of the following entrance examinations is required:

1 a public recital of a program selected by the advisory committee from works on the applicant's repertoire and professional experience record and consisting of a solo group (15 to 20 minutes) and chamber music (40 to 45 minutes);

2. sight-reading examinations (private);

3. written examinations (two hours each): (a) music history placement examination; (b) music theory placement examination; (c) entrance examination in chamber music literature; and (d) entrance examination in piano-vocal literature.

The contents of the public recital, determined by the advisory committee from repertoire proposed by the candidate, are to be communicated to the applicant by the committee not less than 30 days in advance of the recital date. The applicant is responsible for obtaining his/her own supporting performers and is responsible for the overall quality of the performance on this and all other recitals required for the degree. Entrance recitals and placement and entrance examinations are given during the first and second semester registration periods. An interview with the committee takes place after the examinations are completed.

Program of Study

Based on the results of the entrance examinations, the advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 hours beyond the master's degree. The courses and repertoire to be completed as part of the degree requirements will be communicated to the student in writing. Although the program will be organized to meet the individual needs of the student, a typical program may include:

  Semester Hours
Piano (four semesters) 9-12
Chamber Music MUS 605 or 605A 4
Music History 6-12
Music Theory 3-9
Chamber Music Techniques MUS 524 (may be repeated with permission of the instructor) 3
Core Courses in Piano and Chamber Music Literature, Performance Practices, etc. (by advisement) 15-26
Required Recitals (five) (see below) 14
Final Recital EXAM 598 w/ classes; EXAM 599 w/o classes (see below) 0

The five required public recitals may be given in any order:

1. three chamber music recitals (MUS 907 or MUS 908, 3 semester hours each);

2. one lecture-demonstration recital and a written document, the topic of which must be approved in advance by the committee (MUS 907 or MUS 908, 3 semester hours);

3. one vocal-accompanying recital (MUS 912 or MUS 913, 2 semester hours)

A final noncredit 70-minute public recital (EXAM 598 w/ classes; EXAM 599 w/o classes), consisting of music of different periods proposed by the candidate with committee approval, is the final comprehensive examination. The program content of this recital will be communicated to the candidate 60 days in advance of the performance. To be prepared by the candidate without the aid of a teacher or coach, this recital should demonstrate high professional standards of performance.

Minor in Latin American Music

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of Latin American music electives.  Repertoire for applied instruction and for recital programs must include a significant proportion of Latin American music.

Minor in Musicology

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of musicology courses beyond the minimum number of hours already required for the degree. Three of those semester hours must be Research Methodology (MUS 731), unless the student has taken a similar course for the master's degree. At the conclusion of coursework, the student will take a written, four-hour minor comprehensive examination (based on four musicology courses selected by the student).

 

ORCHESTRAL INSTRUMENTS

Prerequisites and Entrance Requirements

Acceptance as a graduate student by the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music is required. The applicant must have extensive performance experience after receiving a master's degree from an accredited institution.

The applicant must submit the following to the advisory committee:

1. as stated in the Admission Process section above, four letters of recommendation, including two from professional colleagues, not teachers of the applicant, attesting to the applicant's past and potential ability as a performer;

2. programs of performances and reviews, if available;

3. complete description of teaching experiences;

4. completed repertoire and professional experience record, obtainable at: http://music.cua.edu/graduate/doctoral.cfm.

The applicant must successfully complete the following entrance requirements:

1. a public recital of a program selected by the advisory committee from works on the applicant's repertoire and professional experience record;

2. written examinations (two hours each): (a) music history placement examination and (b) music theory placement examination.

The contents of the public recital, determined by the advisory committee from repertoire proposed by the candidate, are to be communicated to the applicant by the committee not less than 30 days in advance of the recital date. The applicant is responsible for the overall quality of the performance on this and all other recitals required for the degree. Entrance recitals and placement and entrance examinations are given during the first and second semester registration periods.

Program of Study

Based on the results of the entrance examinations, the advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 hours beyond the master's degree. The courses to be completed as part of the degree requirements will be communicated to the student in writing. The repertoire is to be selected in conjunction with the applied music instructor and with the approval of the adviser. The candidate must demonstrate that he/she has studied a significant proportion of the standard repertoire for his/her instrument. Although the program will be organized to meet the individual needs of the student, a typical program may include:

  Semester Hours
Private Lessons 12
Orchestra (four semesters) MUS 508 4
Chamber Music MUS 605 or 605A, Contemporary Music Ensemble and/or music electives (by advisement) 8
Music History and Music Theory (by advisement) 18
Required Recitals (four) MUS 907 or 908 (see below) 12
Final Recital EXAM 598 w/ classes; EXAM 599 w/o classes (see below) 0

The four required public recitals may be begun after 28 semester hours have been earned on the doctoral level and may be given in any order:

1. solo recital (MUS 907 or 908, 3 semester hours);

2. chamber music recital (MUS 907 or 908, 3 semester hours);

3. concerto recital (MUS 907 or 908, 3 semester hours);

4. lecture-recital, the topic of which must be approved in advance by the committee and must relate to an aspect of performance practice or a phase of music history (MUS 907 or 908, 3 Semester Hours).

Upon successful completion of all courses and the four recitals, the student may begin preparation for the final recital (EXAM 598 w/ classes; EXAM 599 w/o classes), of approximately 60 minutes' duration, for which the candidate will be required to learn and perform in a satisfactory manner a public recital, the program being assigned by the advisory committee 90 days before the date of performance. This program must be prepared by the candidate without the assistance of a coach or teacher. The program may be evaluated by externs.

Minor in Latin American Music

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of Latin American music electives. The lecture-recital must be based on a Latin American music topic.

Minor in Musicology

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of musicology courses beyond the minimum number of hours already required for the degree. Three of those semester hours must be Research Methodology (MUS 731), unless the student has taken a similar course for the master's degree. At the conclusion of coursework, the student will take a written, four-hour minor comprehensive examination (based on four musicology courses selected by the student).

 

PIANO PERFORMANCE

Prerequisites and Entrance Requirements

Acceptance as a graduate student by the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music is required. The applicant must have extensive performance and teaching experience after receiving a master's degree from an accredited institution in piano performance.

The applicant must submit the following to the advisory committee:

1. as stated in the Admission Process section above, four letters of recommendation, including two from professional colleagues, not teachers of the applicant, attesting to the applicant's past and potential ability as a concert performer and teacher;

2. programs of performances and reviews, if available;

3. complete description of teaching experiences;

4. completed repertoire and professional experience record, obtainable at: http://music.cua.edu/graduate/doctoral.cfm.

The applicant must successfully complete the following entrance requirements:

1. a public recital of a program selected by the advisory committee from works on the applicant's repertoire and professional experience record;

2. private performance of a chamber music work selected by the applicant in consultation with the chair of the advisory committee;

3. private performance of a short piece designated to the applicant 24 hours in advance of the performance;

4. written examinations (two hours each):

a. music history placement examination;

b. music theory placement examination;

c. entrance examination in piano pedagogy, materials and methods, and history of the piano and piano playing; and

d. entrance examination in piano literature.

The contents of the public recital, determined by the advisory committee from repertoire proposed by the candidate, are to be communicated to the applicant by the committee not less than 30 days in advance of the recital date. The applicant is responsible for the overall quality of the performance on this and all other recitals required for the degree. Entrance recitals and placement and entrance examinations are given during the first and second semester registration periods. An interview with the committee takes place after the examinations are completed.

Program of Study

Based on the results of the entrance examinations, the advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 hours beyond the master's degree. The courses and repertoire to be completed as part of the degree requirements will be communicated to the student in writing. Although the program will be organized to meet the individual needs of the student, a typical program may include:

  Semester Hours
Piano (four semesters) 12
Chamber Music MUS 605 or 605A 4-5
Piano Literature and Pedagogy 6-12
Music History and Music Theory (by advisement) 12
Electives (by advisement) No more than three credits of electives can be taken in the major instrument. 5-7
Required Recitals (five) MUS 907 or 908 (see below) 15
Final Recital EXAM 598 w/ classes; EXAM 599 w/o classes (see below) 0

The contents of the five required recitals are to be selected by the candidate in consultation with the committee, each is to be of approximately 70 minutes playing time and must be performed from memory, except for the chamber music recital. The concerto repertoire (two concertos) must together total 70 minutes of performance time. The required concertos will normally be accompanied by piano. The securing of the accompanist is the responsibility of the soloist. The recitals may be given in any order:

1. a public solo recital (MUS 907 or MUS 908, 3 semester Hours);

2. a public chamber music performance (MUS 907 or MUS 908, 3 semester hrs);

3. a public lecture-demonstration recital, the topic of which must be approved in advance by the committee (MUS 907 or MUS 908, 3 semester Hours), together with a written document on the topic;

4. two concerto recitals (MUS 907 and MUS 908, each 3 semester Hours).

A final recital (EXAM 598 w/ classes; EXAM 599 w/o classes) (0 semester hours) of 70 minutes' duration is the final comprehensive examination and demonstrates the candidate's ability independently to solve performance issues related to technique, learning, discipline and style. The program content of this recital will be communicated to the candidate 90 days in advance of the performance, and the candidate must prepare this program without the aid of a teacher or coach.

Minor in Latin American Music

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of Latin American music electives. Repertoire for applied piano instruction and for the required solo, chamber, and concerto recitals must in total include a significant proportion of Latin American music. The lecture-demonstration recital and written document must be based on a Latin American music topic.

Minor in Musicology

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of musicology courses beyond the minimum number of hours already required for the degree. Three of those semester hours must be Research Methodology (MUS 731), unless the student has taken a similar course for the master's degree. At the conclusion of coursework, the student will take a written, four-hour minor comprehensive examination (based on four musicology courses selected by the student).

 

VOCAL ACCOMPANYING

Prerequisites and Entrance Requirements

Acceptance as a graduate student by the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music is required. The applicant must have extensive performance and teaching experience after receiving a master's degree from an accredited institution in piano, vocal accompanying, or chamber music performance.

The applicant must submit the following to the advisory committee:

1. as stated in the Admission Process section above, four letters of recommendation, including two from professional colleagues, not teachers of the applicant, attesting to the applicant's past and potential ability as a concert performer;

2. programs of performances and reviews, if available;

3. complete description of teaching experiences;

4. completed repertoire and professional experience record, obtainable at: http://music.cua.edu/graduate/doctoral.cfm.

The applicant must successfully complete the following entrance requirements:

1. a public recital of a program selected by the advisory committee from works on the applicant's repertoire and professional experience record and consisting of a solo group (15 to 20 minutes, memorization preferred) and representative song literature (50 to 55 minutes);

2. sight reading examination of vocal scores and transposition before the advisory committee;

3. written examinations (two hours each):

a. music history placement examination;

b. music theory placement examination;

c. entrance examination in vocal music literature; and

d. entrance examination in piano-chamber music literature.

The contents of the public entrance recital, determined by the advisory committee from repertoire proposed by the candidate, are to be communicated to the applicant by the committee not less than 30 days in advance of the recital date. The applicant is responsible for the overall quality of the performance on this and all other recitals required for the degree. Entrance recitals and placement and entrance examinations are given during the first and second semester registration periods. An interview with the committee takes place after the examinations are completed.

Program of Study

Based on the results of the entrance examinations, the advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 hours beyond the master's degree. Candidates must pass language examinations in French, German and Italian. Graduate courses in these languages may be taken as part of the core courses with the adviser's approval. The courses and repertoire to be completed as part of the degree requirements will be communicated to the student in writing. Although the program will be organized to meet the individual needs of the student, a typical program may include:

  Semester Hours
Piano (four semesters) 9-12
Chamber Music MUS 605 or 605A 2
Music History 6-12
Music Theory 3-9
Opera Coaching Techniques (musical preparation) 6
Core Courses in Vocal Literature,  
Performance Practices, etc. (by advisement) 15-28
Required Recitals (six) (see below) 13
Final Recital EXAM 598 w/ classes; EXAM 599 w/o classes (see below) 0

The contents of the six required public recitals are to be selected by the candidate in consultation with the committee and each is to be of approximately 70 minutes playing time. They may be given in any order:

1. four vocal-accompanying recitals to consist of: one French art song recital, two German Lieder recitals, each of which must contain a major song cycle, and one 20th century song recital; (MUS 912 or MUS 913, each 2 Semester Hours);

2. one vocal-instrumental recital (MUS 912 or MUS 913, 2 semester hours);

3. one chamber music recital (MUS 907 or MUS 908, 3 semester hours).

A final 70-minute public recital (EXAM 598 w/ classes; 599 w/o classes) (0 semester hours), consisting of music of different periods proposed by the candidate with committee approval, is the final comprehensive examination. The program content of this recital will be communicated to the candidate 60 days in advance of the performance. To be prepared by the candidate without the aid of a teacher or coach, this recital should demonstrate high professional standards of performance.

Minor in Latin American Music

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of Latin American music electives. Repertoire for applied instruction and of recital programs must include a significant proportion of Latin American music.

Minor in Musicology

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 54 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of musicology courses beyond the minimum number of hours already required for the degree. Three of those semester hours must be Research Methodology (MUS 731), unless the student has taken a similar course for the master's degree. At the conclusion of coursework, the student will take a written, four-hour minor comprehensive examination (based on four musicology courses selected by the student).

 

VOCAL PERFORMANCE

Prerequisites and Entrance Requirements

Acceptance as a graduate student by the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music is required.

The applicant must have extensive performance and teaching experience after receiving a master's degree from an accredited institution in vocal performance.

The applicant must submit the following to the advisory committee:

1. as stated in the Admission Process section above, four letters of recommendation, including two from professional colleagues, not teachers of the applicant, attesting to the applicant's past and potential ability as a performer;

2. programs of performances and reviews, if available;

3. complete description of teaching experiences;

4. completed repertoire and professional experience record, obtainable at: http://music.cua.edu/graduate/doctoral.cfm.

Foreign language prerequisites include two semesters of undergraduate or master's level study in each of the following languages: Italian, French, and German, with a grade of B or better, taken at an accredited college or university as approved by the adviser and dean. In lieu of taking undergraduate courses, students who place into Italian 103, French 103, or German 103 on the university's Modern Language Test will be considered to have satisfied the prerequisite requirement in the given language(s).

The applicant must successfully complete the following entrance requirements:

1. a public recital of a program of 60 minutes duration selected by the advisory committee from works on the applicant's repertoire and professional experience record, to include works of contrasting styles and demonstrating proficiency in at least two languages in addition to English;

2. written examinations (two hours each):

a. music history placement examination

b. music theory placement examination

The contents of the public entrance recital, determined by the advisory committee from repertoire proposed by the candidate, are to be communicated to the applicant by the committee not less than 30 days in advance of the recital date. The applicant is responsible for the overall quality of the performance on this and all other recitals required for the degree. Entrance recitals and placement and entrance examinations are given during the first and second semester registration periods. An interview with the committee takes place after the examinations are completed.

Program of Study

Based on the results of the entrance examinations, the advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 62 to 72 hours beyond the master's degree. The courses to be completed as part of the degree requirements will be communicated to the student in writing. The repertoire is to be selected in conjunction with the applied music instructor and with the approval of the adviser. All degree recitals are to include appropriate program notes and translations to be approved by the applied music instructor and the adviser.

Although the program will be organized to meet the individual needs of the student, a typical program may include:

  Semester Hours
Voice (four semesters) 12
Music History and Music Theory (by advisement) 9-12
Vocal Literature 6-10
Introduction to Vocal Pedagogy and Physiology MUS 535 2
Courses appropriate to the curriculum (by advisement) 21-33
Recitals or Opera Roles MUS 907 / 908 12
Final Recital EXAM 598 w/ classes; EXAM 599 w/o classes  (see below) 0

A final 0-credit public recital (EXAM 598 w/ classes; EXAM 599 w/o classes) of approximately 60 minutes' duration, proposed by the candidate with committee approval, is the final comprehensive examination. The program content of this recital will be communicated to the candidate 90 days in advance of the performance. To be prepared by the candidate without the aid of a teacher or coach, this recital should demonstrate high professional standards of performance.

Minor in Latin American Music

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 62 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of Latin American music electives. A significant portion of the repertoire for applied instruction and of recital programs must consist of music by Latin American composers.

Minor in Musicology

The advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 62 to 72 semester hours beyond the master's degree, which will include at least 12 semester hours of musicology courses beyond the minimum number of hours already required for the degree. Three of those semester hours must be Research Methodology (MUS 731), unless the student has taken a similar course for the master's degree. At the conclusion of coursework, the student will take a written, four-hour minor comprehensive examination (based on four musicology courses selected by the student).

DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS IN SACRED MUSIC

Concentrations in Choral Music, Composition, Organ

Prerequisites and Entrance Requirements

For general information pertaining to all advisory degree programs, please consult the Doctor of Musical Arts Degree section of these Announcements.

The applicant must have completed the Master of Music in sacred music or equivalent. Acceptance as a graduate student by the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music is required.

The applicant must submit the following:

1. as stated in the Admission Process section above, four letters of recommendation, including two from professional colleagues, not teachers of the applicant, attesting to the applicant's past and potential ability in the field of sacred music and music ministry; and

2. completed repertoire and professional experience record, obtainable at: http://music.cua.edu/graduate/doctoral.cfm.

Applicants in the areas of performance (choral music and organ) will submit a 30-minute tape, video preferred, audio acceptable. Applicants in composition will submit representative manuscripts in lieu of the audition tape. Tapes and manuscripts must be sent to the Office of Graduate Admissions with all other application documents. Invitation to campus for audition, interview and testing is based on evaluation of the above materials. Applicants in organ concentration will perform for the organ faculty at the time of their visit. All concentrations require an on-campus visit for testing and demonstration of conducting skills. Testing consists of demonstration of keyboard proficiency, open score reading, and sight-singing. The conducting audition comprises two specified works with CUA Chamber Choir and will determine placement in the conducting sequence. Auditions are held once each academic year. The applicant should contact the school of music for details and dates.

Written examinations (two hours each):

1. music history placement examination;

2. music theory placement examination;

3. entrance examination in liturgical studies;

4. entrance examination in sacred and choral music.

Placement and entrance examinations are given during the first and second semester registration periods.

The student must also demonstrate a reading knowledge of one foreign language and is expected to pass an examination in that language within one year after beginning doctoral studies. The language will be chosen in consultation with the director of the program.

Program of Study

Based on the results of the entrance requirements and examinations, the advisory committee, in conference with the student, will arrange a program of study of 61 to 72 hours beyond the master's degree. The courses to be completed as part of the degree requirements will be communicated to the student in writing. Although the program will be organized to meet the individual needs of the student, a typical program may include:

  Semester Hours
Sacred and Choral Music (by advisement with director of program) 12
Prerequisites: Liturgical Music (MUS 584), Choral Development (MUS 637), Advanced Conducting I (MUS 638), Choral Literature I, II, or III (MUS 640, 640A, 640B), or M.M. music literature coursework equivalence in the area of specialization.  
Music History and Music Theory (by advisement with director of musicology) 12
Prerequisites: Research Methodology (MUS 731), History of Sacred Music (MUS 556), Analytical Techniques II (MUS 712)  
Liturgical Studies (by advisement with director of liturgical studies) 12
Prerequisites: Introduction to Liturgy (TRS 540), Liturgy: Theological and Historical Perspectives (TRS 741A), Eucharist: A Liturgical Theology (TRS 744)  
Private Instruction in Primary Field 12
Vocal Pedagogy 2
Music Performance: CUA Chamber Choir (MUS 507) 2
Upon completion of unit requirement, noncredit participation in CUA Chamber Choir is required each semester in residence. For this noncredit participation, the student should register for MUS 507A (0 credits).  
Colloquium in Sacred Music (MUS 641)  Enrollment is required each semester in residence. 0
Recitals (see below) 3

Performance Recitals (three) (MUS 914, 1 semester hour each). The public recitals, in the candidate's performance area, must include one with instrumental ensemble. Composition Recitals (two) (MUS 914, 1 semester hour; MUS 913, 2 semester hours) The public recitals must include a two-credit lecture-recital.

 
Treatise (see below) MUS 993 (3 credits); 993A (2 credits); 993B (1 credit) Directed Doctoral Research 6

The required treatise, on a topic approved by the advisory committee, must be in dissertation format and must explore in depth some aspect of sacred music. For the composer, the submission and performance of a treatise-composition approved by the advisory committee.  The treatise is a substantive and formal scholarly research work addressing a specific topic in the field of sacred music. The treatise follows the same format as that required for a dissertation but is typically not equivalent to the dissertation in length or scope. It may treat of kinds of research other than those typical in dissertations, such as cataloging of works or repertory studies, or a compilation of choral works for various liturgical seasons and their performance needs. The treatise shares the following elements in common with the dissertation: topic approval by the faculty, with treatise topic approval form submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies; work written under the direction of the major professor and treatise committee; oral defense; deposit with the Office of Graduate Studies. The procedures for the treatise differ from those for the dissertation in the following elements: approval by the faculty constitutes the sole determinant of the appropriateness of the topic, and the topic does not require external review; members for the oral defense are chosen from the members of the music faculty, as well as theology faculty as may be deemed appropriate.

 
Oral Defense ORAL 999 0

Successful completion of an oral defense is required upon completion and acceptance of the treatise.

 

Graduation Requirements

Comprehensive Examinations (COMP 698-01 w/classes; COMP 699-02 w/o classes). At the completion of coursework, three four-hour written comprehensive examinations are required in:

1. sacred and choral music;

2. music history and music theory; and

3. liturgical studies.

Upon the successful completion of all three comprehensive examinations, the student may be admitted to candidacy.

Minor in Latin American Music

The degree program consists of between 61 to 72 semester hours of credit beyond the master's degree. The above requirements apply with the following exceptions.

1. Depending on the results of the entrance examination in the area of music history, the student may be assigned from 0-12 semester hours of credit in this area by advisement.

2. The program of study will include 12 semester hours of Latin American music electives.

3. The treatise must be written on an Iberian or Latin American topic.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

 

The DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY (Ph.D.) degree is offered only in the field of musicology. Musicology in this sense is interpreted to mean the entire field of music that is appropriate for scientific research. A suitable subject for the dissertation must be selected from the specific fields of music history.

The student must file an application with the Ph.D. committee for admission to the Ph.D. program and must conform to the general requirements for admission to candidacy as outlined in the section on the doctoral degree in the general information section of these Announcements. Four letters of recommendation are required, at least two of which should be from professors of music history, music theory, or other academic courses. The application must include at least one substantial original research paper on any musical topic. The writing sample should demonstrate solid bibliographical skills, critical use of sources, good writing and organizational skills, and proficiency in identifying a problem and formulating an original argument. The Master's thesis (or a portion thereof) is often appropriate.

The M.A. in musicology or a comparable preparation is a prerequisite for entry into the Ph.D. program. The M.M. in performance may constitute preparation comparable to the M.A. in some instances, but in others additional work in the form of specific courses may be required. The master's degree, however, is only a minimal prerequisite and in itself is not sufficient. An admissions committee will screen all applicants to determine their abilities to pursue doctoral work. Judgment will be based on the following: demonstrated ability in previous studies, writing and research skills, academic references indicating the aptitude and desire for research in the field and interviews with the admissions committee and with certain other members of the faculty, depending on the particular interests of the applicant. A student who intends to complete both the M.A. and the Ph.D. at The Catholic University of America must normally complete the master's thesis before the Admissions Committee will consider an application for admission to the Ph.D. program.

Applicants must complete music history and music theory placement examinations before registration is completed. If the results of these examinations indicate areas of deficiency, the student must remove these deficiencies by taking specified graduate review or undergraduate courses. These courses do not count toward degree requirements. Placement examinations are given during the first and second semester registration periods.

The student must also work out a clear program of study in consultation with the adviser and dissertation major professor. The subject for dissertation research can be one of the strongest factors in determining the student's actual courses. All students must choose a minor field as part of their program of study; this minor field is often a related area within music, though other fields may be chosen as appropriate to the student's interests and qualifications. Proficiency in the major and minor fields will be tested in written comprehensive examinations (COMP 698-01 w/classes; COMP 699-02 w/o classes). Students will consult with the adviser as to their preparedness before presenting themselves for these examinations. To be admitted to candidacy, the student must pass both major and minor comprehensive examinations and must be recommended by the faculty in the area of study.

Students must also demonstrate a reading knowledge of French and German. In some instances another language (such as Latin, for example) may be substituted for one of these if it is pertinent to the candidate's research. Students are expected to pass at least one foreign language examination during the first semester of graduate study (or, if part time, before completing 12 semester hours), and the other examination within one year after they begin graduate work (or, if part time, before completing 24 semester hours). Both foreign language requirements must be completed before the student is permitted to take the comprehensive examinations.

A graduate student who has received a grade of C or F in a graduate course is permitted to repeat the course one time. The calculation of the grade point average will include only the grade earned in the repeated course. For students in graduate programs, an average of B or better is required for graduation.

Candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Musicology are referred to the general section of these Announcements under the heading The Doctoral Degree for information regarding coursework, transfer of credits, language, comprehensive examinations, admission to candidacy, dissertation, criteria for dissertation, oral examination (ORAL 998-01 w/classes; COMP 999-02 w/o classes), publication of dissertation, copyright and completion of requirements and request for extension.

Music History

The Ph.D. degree in music history is a research degree for students primarily interested in the field of music history.

Program of Study

The program for each student will be planned by the student's adviser and is subject to the approval of the dean. It will normally include the following in the major field:

  Semester Hours
Three Musicology Period Courses 9
Research Methodology MUS 731 3
Music Paleography MUS 729 3
Four Seminars 12
Five Electives 15
Musicology Colloquium 599/599A without classes 0
Total 42

Enrollment is required each semester in residence.

The selection of period courses shall be made in consultation with the adviser; the required period courses shall be determined by performance on the music history placement exam, and previous course experience in the Master of Arts degree, as well as the need to provide a well-rounded selection of courses covering all periods of music history. If deemed necessary, period courses may replace one or more electives. A minimum of 12 additional semester hours must be taken in the minor field, with the expectation that these 12 hours are sufficient to provide a sold base of knowledge in the subject area. If additional hours are deemed necessary for the minor, these shall be drawn from the electives. If the minor field is in music theory, the student shall take the following courses: Analytical Techniques I and II (six semester hours) and electives in theory (six semester hours). A minor field outside of music may be chosen if the student has the necessary undergraduate prerequisites to qualify for graduate courses and if such a field is pertinent to the student's program. For example, students who wish to write dissertations on subjects in the medieval period and who have adequate preparation will be encouraged to take 12 semester hours of medieval Latin as part of their minor. Other minor fields that provide a valuable complement to courses in music history are anthropology, history and art history. Minor fields in performance may be permitted, pending a successful audition and approval by both the musicology faculty and the appropriate applied music faculty; a minor in performance requires 15 semester hours and a graduate-level recital, as explained in the section below. In deciding on a minor field, students should consult with both their musicology adviser and appropriate faculty adviser in the field in which they propose to take their minor. Students who select a minor field other than music theory are still strongly encouraged to select Analytical Techniques I and II as two of their electives.

Minor in Performance

A student who wishes to pursue a minor in performance must first audition for the appropriate applied music faculty, who will determine whether or not the student qualifies for applied music study at the graduate level. If approved by both the applied music faculty and the musicology faculty, the minor field will then consist of fifteen semester hours: six in applied music and nine in pedagogy and literature.

The student must also give one graduate-level recital and take a written comprehensive examination on pedagogy and literature of that performance discipline.

For a student who minors in performance, the total requirements for both the major and minor field will be as follows:

  Semester Hours
Major  
Three Musicology Period Courses 9
Research Methodology MUS 731 3
Music Paleography MUS 729 3
Four Seminars 12
Four Electives 12
Musicology Colloquium MUS 599, 599A w/o classes 0
Minor:  
Pedagogy and Literature Courses 9
Applied Music 6
Recital MUS 939 0
Total 54

Minor in Latin American Music

A student who wishes to pursue a minor in Latin American music will determine, in consultation with the faculty adviser, a program containing at least 12 semester hours of Latin American music electives.

The student must pass a comprehensive examination in the minor area. In addition, one of the student's two foreign languages should be Spanish, and the dissertation must be written on a Latin American music topic. If the student elects to use applied music instruction as part of the minor area requirements, a significant portion of the repertoire studied must consist of music by Latin American composers.

 

Music Theory (Ph.D.)-- Please note: The School of Music is currently not accepting applicants to the Music Theory emphasis of the Ph.D.

Graduate Artist Diploma

The Artist Diploma may be more appropriate than the Doctor of Musical Arts degree for the student seeking total concentration in performance at the post-master's level.  Thus, the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music offers the Graduate Artist Diploma, a graduate-level non-degree performance program for only the most talented and outstanding performers. This program is offered to students in the performing areas of orchestral conducting, piano, strings (violin and cello only) and voice.  Interested students should contact the Office of Graduate Admissions for the particulars in relation to the application process.

Entrance Requirements

Applicants to this program must have a Bachelor of Music degree with a major in performance or a Performers Certificate that represents a minimum of a three-year performance-intensive program. For the Graduate Artist Diploma in orchestral conducting, a master's degree or its equivalent is preferred. Required credentials for admission to the music school include an application, application fee, official transcripts of all postsecondary studies, two letters of recommendation, a repertoire list and evidence of a performing career in progress (such as programs and/or critical reviews).

Students whose first language is not English must submit TOEFL results of 92 or higher (iBT test), (for paper-based test: 580 or higher; for computer-based test: 237 or higher), to be considered for admission.

Final admission to the program is granted following successful completion of a 60-minute artist diploma admission audition, which must be presented before coursework begins and should include selections demonstrating the student's ability to perform in various styles. The singer's audition program must also demonstrate proficiency in French, German and Italian.

The applicant must audition in person if residing in the United States. Applicants for the Graduate Artist Diploma in orchestral conducting are asked to submit a videotape of a public performance, reading session or rehearsal, minimum length of 30 minutes, demonstrating diverse styles of orchestral repertoire; in addition, they will take a written and aural examination.

Program of Study

To receive the Graduate Artist Diploma, the student must successfully complete a curriculum of 35 or 36 semester hours, as described below, with an average of B or better. Enrollment for a minimum of four semesters is required, with a maximum period of three years allowed for completion of the program. Transfer credits may not be accepted to satisfy course requirements. Credits for coursework apply toward program requirements after the artist diploma audition is passed.

Classes chosen for the music electives requirement should be lecture or lecture/activity courses to be determined with the program adviser. Examples include music theory, music history or similar courses appropriate to the major. All required recitals are to be performed in public before a committee of the music school faculty and will be graded on a pass/fail basis.

Orchestral Conducting

  Semesters Semester Hours
Private Lessons 4 8
Graduate Conducting Seminar MUS 643   4 12
Music Electives (by advisement) 2 6
Recitals (MUS 938) (see below) 3 9
Total   35

Three 70-minute recitals are required, the orchestral repertoire for which is to be decided upon between the candidate and the conducting professor. The candidate must demonstrate that he/she has studied a significant proportion of the standard orchestral repertoire, including music written after 1920. Opportunities for meeting the recital requirement will be provided by arrangement with the university orchestra, appropriate public performances or designated performances with the CUA opera.

Piano

  Semesters Semester Hours
Private Lessons 4 12
Music Electives (by advisement) 3 8
Chamber Music MUS 605 or 605A 4 4
Recitals (MUS 938) (see below) 4 12
Total   36

Four recitals are required: two solo recitals, one recital consisting of two concertos and one chamber music or chamber music/accompanying recital. The soloist is responsible for securing the accompanist for the concerto recital and the additional performers for the chamber music or chamber music/accompanying recital.

Strings (violin and cello only)

  Semesters Semester Hours
Private Lessons 4 12
Music Elective (by advisement) 1 3
Orchestra MUS 508 4 4
Chamber Music MUS 605 or 605A 4 4
Recitals (MUS 938) (see below) 4 12
Total   35

Four recitals are required: three solo recitals and one recital consisting of two concertos. The soloist is responsible for securing the accompanist for all recitals.

Voice

  Semesters Semester Hours
Private Lessons 4 12
Vocal Coaching 2 6
Music Electives (by advisement) 2 6
Recitals (MUS 938) (see below) 4 12
Total   36

Four solo recitals or two solo recitals and two major pera roles are required. The soloist is responsible for securing the accompanist for all recitals.

The student must complete, or must already have completed, two semesters of undergraduate study in Italian, French and German at an accredited college or university. In lieu of undergraduate study, the student may successfully complete placement examinations in these languages, administered by the modern languages department, verifying placement into second-year study.

Music Teacher Certification Program

This nondegree program, approved by NCATE and NASDTEC, was originally designed to meet the needs of those who hold a bachelor's degree in music and who wish to be certified to teach music in the elementary or secondary school. This program is available also, however, to undergraduate students who wish to pursue music education certification simultaneously with the completion of a Bachelor of Music degree in a field other than music education.

Graduate students may complete this program entirely on a nondegree basis, as a means of obtaining certification without the additional requirements associated with a master's degree, or they may pursue this program in conjunction with a master's degree.

Students who wish to pursue the latter option must successfully complete the admission and curriculum requirements listed below, plus all admission and curriculum requirements in their specific master's degree program. For students pursuing a master's degree, graduate-level courses taken as part of this Music Teacher Education Program may, with the approval of the adviser and dean, be accepted as electives.

In addition to meeting the general requirements for admission as a graduate nondegree student, a graduate student who wishes to pursue this program must successfully complete the following additional entrance requirements: (1) a 10-minute proficiency audition on the student's major instrument (or voice) prior to admission; (2) a music theory placement examination and a music history placement examination prior to first enrollment for courses; (3) a keyboard proficiency examination; and (4) the Pre-Professional Skills Test, which must be passed before the student can enroll in MUS 453, 454, 455 or 456. In addition, those who wish to become certified in general-choral music education must complete a vocal proficiency examination. A thorough review of the student's transcript(s) will be made. Based upon the transcript review and the results of the audition and the proficiency and placement examinations, required prerequisite study may be assigned by the adviser if necessary.

Program of Study Semester Hours
Core Courses for both General-Choral and Instrumental Emphasis:  
MUS 138 Introduction to Music Education 1
MUS 150 Field Experiences in Music Education (minimum 100 hours required) 0
EDUC 581 The Education of the Exceptional* 3

EDUC 652 Psychology of Learning: Implications for Instructional Design

3
or  
EDUC 361 Psychology of Education*  
EDUC 701 Philosophical Foundations of Education (or EDUC 251, Foundations of Education)* 3
Total Core Courses: 10
Additional Courses, General-Choral Emphasis:  
MUS 421 Elementary General-Choral Student Teaching 4
MUS 421A Secondary General-Choral Student Teaching 4
MUS 421B General-Choral Student Teacher Seminar 1
MUS 453 Elementary General-Choral Music Methods 3
MUS 454 Secondary General-Choral Music Methods 3
MUPI Private Voice Instruction (by advisement, as needed) 0-4
Total Additional Courses, General-Choral Emphasis 15-19
Total Music Teacher Certification Program, General-Choral Emphasis: 25-29
Additional Courses, Instrumental Emphasis:  
MUS 422 Elementary Instrumental Student Teaching 4
MUS 422A Secondary Instrumental Student Teaching 4
MUS 422B Instrumental Student Teaching Seminar 1
MUS 455 Elementary and Middle School Instrumental Music Methods 3
MUS 456 Secondary Instrumental Music Methods 3
MUS Secondary Instrument Classes: Brass, Woodwinds, Strings, Percussion, and/or Guitar (by advisement, as needed) 0-12
Total Additional Courses: Instrumental Emphasis: 15-27
Total Music Teacher Certification Program, Instrumental Emphasis: 25-37

*Core courses at graduate level (EDUC 581, 586, 652, 701) may be applicable to master's degree curriculum.
 

Footnotes