The Catholic University of America

School of Engineering

Officers of Instruction

Faculty

Charles C. Nguyen, D.Sc.
Dean and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Jandro Abot, Ph.D. Clinical Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Frank A. Andrews, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Mohammad Arozullah, Ph.D.
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
H. Bulent Atabek, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Biomedical Engineering
Joseph Bishop Lecturer in Civil Engineering
J. Steven Brown, Ph.D., P.E.
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Kenneth A. Byrd, Ph.D. Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering
Mario J. Casarella, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Lin-Ching Chang, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Esam ElDin Aly El-Araby, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Andrew G. Favret, D.Engr.
Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Victor Frenkel, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Edward D. Jordan, Ph.D., P.E.
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
John A. Judge, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Timothy W. Kao, Ph.D., P.E.
Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
Ozlem Kilic, D.Sc.
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Poul V. Lade, Ph.D.
Professor of Civil Engineering
Sang Wook Lee, Ph.D. Assistant Professor Biomedical Engineering
Sung Ching Ling, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Biomedical Engineering
Gunnar Lucko, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Civil Engineering
Peter Lum, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Scott Mathews, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
George Mavroeidis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering
Dennis McCahill, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
John J. McCoy, Sc.D.
Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
George E. McDuffie, Ph.D., P.E.
Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Robert Meister, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Nader M. Namazi, Ph.D.
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Sen Nieh, Ph.D.
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Tongyan Pan, Ph.D., P.E. Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering
Hsien Ping Pao, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
Erion Plaku, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Jessica Ramella-Roman, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Phillip A. Regalia, Ph.D.
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Michael C. Soteriades. D.Sc., P.E.
Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
Lu Sun, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Civil Engineering
Harold Szu, Ph.D. Research Ordinary Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Binh Q. Tran, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Joseph Vignola, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Zhaoyang Wang, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Yun Chow Whang, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Otto C. Wilson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Yi Yang, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Associates of the Faculty

Abdella Battou, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
John Bonita, Ph.D., P.E.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
David Brennan, M.S.B.E.
Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering
Charles E. Campbell Jr., Ph.D.
Lecturer in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Alan B. Carr, M.S. Lecturer in Engineering Management
Isaac Chang, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Jim Christ, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Carl T. Demarco, R. Ph.D, J.D. Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering
Jeffrey R. Didion, M.S.
Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
Ronald Driggers, Ph.D. Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
Benjamin Dzikowicz, Ph.D. Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
David Feit, Ph.D. Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
Joseph Findaro, J.D.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Jeffrey E. Fernandez, Ph.D., P.E., C.P.E. Lecturer in Engineering Management
Larry D. Ferreiro, Ph.D. Lecturer in Engineering Management
Jeffrey E. Giangiuli, M.S.E. Lecturer in Engineering Management
James W. Hudson, B.S.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Boyd A. Jones, Ph.D. Lecturer in Engineering Management
Philip C. Jones, J.D.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Michael P. Kushner, M.B.A., P.M.P. Lecturer in Engineering Management
William LaPlante, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
S. Samuel Lin, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Francis Linehan, M.E.E.
Lecturer in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
George Mattingly, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Engineering
John McTyre, M.S.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Patrick Mehl, Ph.D. Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering
S.A. Mohsberg, III, M.S.E., P.E. Lecturer in Engineering Management
M. Nagaraja, Ph.D. Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
William Newnam, M.S. Lecturer in Engineering Management
Tuan Nguyen, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor in Mechanical Engineering
Silas C. Nichols, Ph.D. Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Ken O'Connell, Ph.D., P.E.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Neil Palumbo, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Mark Pettinato, M.S.
Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering
Long Phan, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Donald Purcell, J.D. Lecturer in Engineering Management
Lawrence Schuette, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Matthew D. Sermon, M.S.E. Lecturer in Engineering Management
Jeffrey W. Shupp, M.D. Adjunct Assistant Professor in Biomedical Engineering
Stephen Sullivan  
Sivakumar Tadikonda, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Richard C. Thompson, Jr., M.S.E., M.B.A., A.I.A. Lecturer in Engineering Management
Diego Turo, Ph.D. Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
Adam Wolfe, Ph.D. Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
Bing Xu, Ph.D. Lecturer in Civil Engineering
K. Yavuz, Ph.D. Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
Tse-Fou Zien, Ph.D. Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Biomedical Engineering Advisory Council

Diane L. Damiano, Ph.D. Chief, Functional & Applied Biomechanics Section, NIH, Bethesda, Md.
Edward B. Healton, M.D., M.P.H.
Medical Director, National Rehabilitation Hospital, Washington, D.C.
Corinna Lathan, Ph.D.
President, Anthrotronix Inc., Silver Spring, Md.
Seong K. Mun, Ph.D. Director, Institute of Advanced Study Virginia Tech, Alexandria, Va.
Joel B. Myklebust, Ph.D. Deputy Director, Office of Science & Engineering Laboratories, FDA, Silver Spring, Md.
Aydin Tozeren, Ph.D.
Professor, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pa.

Civil Engineering Advisory Council

Albert Grant, B.C.E.
Consulting Engineer, Potomac, Md.
Timothy W. Kao, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
Melissa L. Prelewicz, M.S.C.E.
Manager, Professional and Technical Activities, American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, Va.
Larry Moore, P.E. Director of Engineering, Clark Concrete Contractors, LLC, Bethesda, Md.
William J. Murphy, P.E.
Principal, Schnabel Engineering North, Leesburg, Va.
Dennis McCahill, Ph.D.
Construction Consultant, Annapolis, Md.
Steven Smith, Ph.D. Principal Engineer and Group Manager, CTL Group, Columbia, Md.
Mark J. Tamaro, P.E. Vice President, Thorton Tomasetti, Washington, DC.
Richard L. Vogel Senior Vice President, The Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., Bethesda, Md.
Tony Warner, M.S.C.E.
President, Warner Construction Consultants, Inc., Rockville, Md.
Gregory Welter, M.S.C.E.
Senior Project Engineer, O'Brien & Gere Engineers Inc., Landover, Md.
James A. Wilding, B.C.E.
President Emeritus, Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, Washington, D.C.

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Advisory Council

Thomas E. Bordley, Sc.D.
Chief Scientist, General Dynamics Advanced Technology Systems, Washington, D.C.
Kevin Cleary, Ph.D. Technical Director, Bioengineering Initiative, Sheikh Zayed Center for Pediatric Surgical Innovation, Children's National Medical Center, Washington, D.C.
Tarek El-Ghazawi, Ph.D. Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, D.C.
Jon Huppenthal President and CEO, SRC Computers, LLC, Colorado Springs, Co.
Per Kullstam, Ph.D.
Paircom, Inc., Springfield, Va.
Jose R. Latimer, Ph.D. Business Area Executive for Homeland Protection, Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.
Seong Mun, Ph.D.
Director, Institute of Advanced Study Virginia Tech, Alexandria,Va.
Jude R. Nitsche Senior Vice President and Corporate Director, Applied Physics Sciences Corp., Arlington, Va.
Ronald Waynant, Ph.D.
Senior Optical Engineering, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, FDA, Rockville, Md.
Kay Stepper, Ph.D. Marketing, Produce Planning and Innovation Management, Robert Bosch LLC, Plymouth, Mi.
Ananthram Swami, Ph.D.
Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Md.
Raphael Wong Potomac Falls, Va.

Mechanical Engineering Advisory Council

Richard Dame, Ph.D.
President (Retired), Mega Engineering, Silver Spring, Md.
Charles "Skip" Derick
GSA Services Schedules, Anteon Corporation, Fairfax, Va.
David Didion, Ph.D
Retired NIST Fellow, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Port Republic, Md.
Stan Halperson
Executive Committee Member of ASME, Washington, D.C.
Don Marlowe
Standards Administrator (Retired), Science and Health Communication, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, Md.
Steven Russell, Ph.D.

Ship Systems Engineering Office of Naval Research, Arlington, Va.

Jaclyn A. Schade
Registered Patent Agent, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP, McLean, Va.
Karlena Schwing
Staff Attorney, Cleary, Gotlieb Stein and Hamilton LLP, Washington, D.C.
Stephen Wilson Deputy Director, Ship Signature Department, NSWC - Carderock, West Bethesda, Md.

History

The engineering program was established in 1896, soon after the founding of The Catholic University of America. The School of Engineering was formally established as a separate school in 1930 and was shortly thereafter renamed as the School of Engineering and Architecture. In 1992 the School of Engineering and Architecture separated into the School of Engineering and the School of Architecture and Planning. Prior to 1950, the primary focus of the school was on undergraduate professional programs, although there always have been graduate programs in the school.

However, research activity and graduate professional offerings have increased at a steady rate since 1950. Today the school offers bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in five academic programs as well as a master's degree in engineering management and material engineering. The school prides itself on being a small Catholic engineering school providing quality education with a personal touch.

Students can expect close interaction with faculty, small class sizes, a small student-to-teacher ratio and a faculty dedicated to teaching and research. All members of the full-time faculty hold doctoral degrees and are very active in funded research and scholarly publication.

The school's strong ties with local research institutions such as NASA, NIH and NRL etc., foster research collaborations and enable our faculty to bring research experience into the classroom. Students can benefit from ample research assistantships from funded research projects.

Goals

As stated in its strategic plan developed in 2007, The Catholic University of America's School of Engineering provides a personalized learning and research environment in which faculty, staff and students achieve excellence in research, education and service. It emphasizes research and scholarship of the highest possible caliber and provides personalized instruction at both the graduate and undergraduate levels.

Graduate programs in the school emphasize both theory and application of advanced engineering principles. The goal of the school is to produce professional engineers, scientists and researchers who can contribute significantly to society through their chosen profession and scientific and research activities.

Degree Programs

Through its four departments and engineering programs, the school offers graduate programs leading to the Master of Science (M.S.) degree and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in the following concentration areas:

  • Biomedical Engineering (M.S., Ph.D.)

  • Civil Engineering (M.S., Ph.D.)

  • Electrical Engineering (M.S., Ph.D.)

  • Computer Science (M.S., Ph.D.)

  • Mechanical Engineering (M.S., Ph.D.)

  • Engineering Management (M.S. only)
  • Materials Science and Engineering (M.S. only)
  • The curricula of the master's degree programs aimed at a particular discipline provide in-depth coverage of topics related to the discipline.  

Special Regulations

Admission

Admission to the School of Engineering follows the general university regulations (see Admission to Graduate Study in this Announcements). We present here general admission regulations pertaining only to the graduate degree programs of the School of Engineering. Additional specific requirements for admission to particular programs, if any, are given in the departmental sections. Admission to all graduate degree programs is made by the dean of the School of Engineering upon the recommendation of the chair/director of the appropriate graduate program.

International Students

International students from countries where English is not the primary language must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language, TOEFL. Students achieving a score of 580 or higher on the paper-based test, 237 or higher on the computer-based test, or 93 on the Internet-based test will be given regular admission provided their academic background is satisfactory. Prior to registration for courses, the students will be evaluated for English language skills by CUA's Intensive English Program. Depending on the evaluation, students may be required to take intensive classes in English to strengthen their skills. Subject to the approval of a student's academic adviser, students can take intensive English classes concurrently with a reduced number of School of Engineering graduate engineering courses.

Doctoral Degree Programs

The minimum grade point average, GPA, required for admission to the doctoral degree programs is 3.4. In special circumstances, program chairs and faculty may petition for students to be admitted who do not meet the GPA guideline. There is no provisional admission for the doctoral programs.

Master Degree Programs

The minimum requirement for admission to the M.S. degree program is a baccalaureate degree from an accredited university. The minimum requirement for admission to the master's degree program of a particular engineering program is an undergraduate degree from an accredited engineering program. Additional requirements may apply based on undergraduate performance. The minimum GPA required for regular admission to master's degree programs is 3.0 for bachelors-level courses. Provisional admission may be granted to students with a bachelor's-level GPA less than 3.0. Provisional admission will be converted to regular admission after the student passes a set of approved graduate level courses with a minimum GPA of 3.0.

Degree Requirements

The degree requirements for graduate studies in the School of Engineering generally follow the university requirements (see General Requirements of Graduate Studies). We present here general degree requirements pertaining only to the graduate degree programs of the School of Engineering. Additional specific degree requirements for particular programs, if any, are provided in the departmental sections.

Grade Point Average for Graduation

A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 in coursework taken in the School of Engineering is required for graduation in all graduate programs.

Master's Degree

The university's general requirements for graduate study for the master's and licentiate degrees apply to all master's degree programs offered in the School of Engineering. There are, however, two exceptions: competency in a foreign language is not required and a comprehensive examination is not required. The minimum requirements for the master's degree are the successful completion of an approved program of study consisting of at least 30 semester credit hours. Individual programs may require more than 30 semester credit hours. Two options are available to complete the requirements.

Nonthesis Option

A student may complete the required semester credit hours through graduate coursework with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.

Thesis Option

A student may write a master's thesis whose topic is approved by the appropriate graduate program. If this option is selected, the student registers for a total of six semester credit hours of master's thesis guidance. Upon approval of the written thesis, six semester credit hours, which count toward the minimum 30, will be posted to the student's academic record. The remaining number of semester credit hours of graduate coursework must be completed with a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0.

Core Masters-Level Course

All students pursuing a master's degree in the programs of biomedical, civil, electrical and mechanical engineering are required to pass with a grade of C or better in two of the four courses: Graduate Level Applied Mathematics, Numerical Methods in Engineering, Engineering Economics and Engineering Systems Analysis. Each program may impose further restrictions regarding which courses their students must take.

Joint Master's Degree Programs

Some graduate programs in the School of Engineering participate in joint degree programs that allows students to earn two engineering master's degrees. The student must satisfy all requirements for both degrees but may be allowed to designate up to four approved graduate engineering courses to partially satisfy the requirements for both degrees. Typically, this would reduce the total number of graduate engineering courses required to earn both master's degrees from 20 courses to 16 courses. Contact the dean's office of the School of Engineering for more information.

Doctoral Degree

The university's general requirements for graduate study for the doctoral degree apply to all doctoral programs of the School of Engineering, with one exception: the foreign language competency exam is not required. The requirements for a doctoral degree (Ph.D.) of the school include:

1. a minimum of 53 semester hours of graduate work in a program of study prepared and approved in consultation with an adviser;

2. the successful passing of a comprehensive examination upon completion of the graduate coursework;

3. the approval of a dissertation proposal submitted and presented by the candidate; and

4. the approval and successful defense of the dissertation in an oral examination conducted as specified by university procedures.

Transfer of Credit

Up to six semester credit hours of graduate work earned at another accredited institution with a grade of B or higher may be applied toward course requirements for master's degrees upon recommendation of the appropriate graduate program and with the approval of the dean of the school. Up to 24 semester credit hours of graduate work earned at another accredited institution with a grade of B or higher may be applied toward course requirements for the doctoral degrees upon recommendation of the appropriate graduate program and with the approval of the dean of the school. For students who earned their master's degrees at CUA, up to 30 semester credit hours of coursework with a grade of B or above may be applied toward the course requirements for the doctoral degrees.

Department of Biomedical Engineering

Professor Emeritus H.T. Atabek, Sung Ching Ling
Associate Professors Victor Frenkel; Peter Lum, Chair; Jessica Ramella-Roman; Binh Tran, Otto Wilson, Jr.
Assistant Professors Sang Wook Lee 
Lecturers David Brennan; Kenneth A. Byrd; Carl DeMarco; Patrick Mehl; Mark Pettinato
Research Ordinary Professor Harold Szu

The Department of Biomedical Engineering offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering, and Doctor of Philosophy, Ph.D. The focus of graduate education is to provide biomedical engineers with the principles and tools of modern engineering, applied to solving problems in medicine or biology.

Courses are offered in the following areas of concentration:

  • Biomaterials and Biotechnology

  • Biomechanics & Rehabilitation Engineering

  • Biomedical Instrumentation & Medical Imaging

  • Home Care Technologies & Telemedicine

  • Clinical Engineering

The Biomedical Engineering Program has strong interaction with the Department of Mechanical Engineering and the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in terms of course offerings and research activities. Graduate students may follow one of two tracks-thesis or coursework designed for two distinct groups of students. The first track offers both master's and doctoral programs and is directed at those students pursuing research activities that will culminate in a thesis or dissertation. The coursework requirements are intended to prepare the student for research.

The second track offers only a master's degree program intended for recent graduates, practicing engineers and/or medical professionals interested in specialized areas pertinent to career objectives. These professional degree programs enable the engineer or scientist to become familiar with new developments and advances in technologies. These programs allow flexibility in course selection, including those outside the department.

Qualified CUA undergraduate students are encouraged to pursue graduate studies via the accelerated BS-MS program.

Admission

In addition the school's admissions guidelines (under Special Regulations) for regular admission status to the masters and doctoral degree programs in biomedical engineering, students will be admitted based upon enrollment availability and their ability to meet the following recommended entrance requirements:

  • Students must have received a bachelor's degree in engineering, science or mathematics from an accredited institution and, in addition must satisfy:

  • All minimum university requirements

  • A cumulative undergraduate GPA of at least a 3.0 out of 4.0 (master's) or 3.4 out of 4.0 (doctoral)

  • A cumulative GRE score (verbal plus quantitative) of at least 1250 (master's) or 1300 (doctoral)

Students not meeting the above minimum requirements may receive provisional admission (master's only) as recommended by the graduate committee and/or department chair. Performance of provisional students will be reviewed after one semester of graduate study for transfer to regular admission status.

Students from nonengineering disciplines may be required to take prerequisite courses (e.g., statics, dynamics, electrical circuits, differential equations, fluid mechanics, etc.), as appropriate.

Master's Degree

Graduate students plan their program in consultation with an adviser and may elect to pursue a broad master's degree program without specific concentration or to major in one of the areas identified above. Maximum flexibility in scope of studies is afforded by utilization of courses offered in other departments of the university or other local universities through the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area.

Requirements for the master's degree programs follow those established for the school. Please refer to Degree Requirements.

Doctoral Degree

Requirements for the doctoral degree program follow those established for the school. Please refer to Degree Requirements.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

BE Course Title
501 Biomaterials
502 Advanced Biomechanics
504 Biomechanics of Hard Tissue
506 Biomechanics of Soft Tissue
513 Biomedical Instrumentation
514 Bio-Optics
515 Biomedical Signal Processing
516 Bioelectromagnetics
518 Biomedical Sensors
522 Human Locomotion
523 Biomedical Assessment of Locomotion Disorders
524 Principles of Prosthetics and Orthotics
527 Cell and Tissue Engineering
528 Rehabilitation Engineering
529 Clinical Engineering
530 Human-Computer Interfaces
532 Sensory Motor Integration
533 Human Factors Engineering & Ergonomics
540 Home Care Technologies Seminar
541 Home Care Tech 1: Foundations
542 Home Care Tech 2: Product Evaluation
544 Telemedicine & E-Health
546 Medical Device Design
552 Biotechnology & Biomedicine
554 Bioinformatics
581 Medical Imaging
583 Novel Topics in Medical Imaging
593 Biomedical Research Methods
596 BMED Graduate Internship Projects
613 Advanced Topics in Medical Instrumentation
671 Cardio-Pulmonary Biomechanics
683 Principles & Biomedical Applications of Fluorescence
721 Adv Neuro-Mechanical Modeling and Control
728 Adv Topics in Rehabilitation Engineering
729 Advanced Topics in Biomaterials
733 Mathematical Modeling in Biology
991, 992 Directed Research
993, 994 Directed Research
995, 996 Master's Thesis Guidance
997, 998 Doctoral Dissertation Guidance
ENGR Course Title
501 Introduction to Mechatronics
503 Control Systems
504 Modern Control Systems
510 Strategic Standardization
516 Computational Methods for Graduate Students
518 Experimental Techniques for Graduate Students
520 Mathematical Analysis for Graduate Students
540 Reliability Engineering
584 Intro to Nanotechnology
ME Course Title
503 Structural Mechanics
504 Finite Element Methods
543 Heat Exchange: Design & Analysis
547 Intermediate Thermodynamics
548 Intermediate Heat Transfer
549 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
571 Adv Design of Mechanical Systems
572 Computer Control-Mech Systems
645, 646 Foundations of Fluid Mechanics I, II
CE Course Title
502 Introduction to Continuum Mechanics
543 Environmental Microbiol/Biol Processes
EE Course Title
503 Telecommunication Technologies
527 Neural Networks
535 Digital Image Processing-Biomed Applications
561 Random Signal Theory I
586 Intel Control/ Fuzzy Logic Apps
652 Wireless Communications
NURS Course Title
561 Aging: Holistic Perspectives on Health
698 Pathophysiology
BIOL Course Title
518 Physiology
569 Immunology
750 Chemical Diagnosis of Disease
PSY Course Title
536 Human-Computer Interaction
570 Psychology of Computer Design and Virtual Reality
759 Cognitive Neuroscience

 

Department of Civil Engineering

Professor Poul V. Lade; Lu Sun, Chair
Professors Emeriti John J. Baltrukonis; Timothy Kao; Dennis McCahill; John J. McCoy; Hsien-Ping Pao; Michael C. Soteriades
Associate Professor Gunnar Lucko
Assistant Professors George Mavroeidis; Arash Massoudieh; Tongyan Pan
Lecturers Joseph Bishop; John Bonita; Joseph Findaro; James W. Hudson; William A. Joyce; John McTyre; Silas Nichols; Kenneth O'Connell; Philip C. Jones; S. Samuel Lin; Long Phan; Steven Sullivan; Bing Xu

The goal of the educational programs in civil engineering is to produce graduates who are schooled in engineering fundamentals and capable of doing advanced engineering work. To this end, programs offered in the Department of Civil Engineering are professional in nature and lead to the Master of Science degree, and the Doctor of Philosophy, Ph.D. Major areas include fluid and solid mechanics, structures and structural mechanics, geotechnical engineering, environmental engineering and management, systems engineering, transportation engineering, and construction engineering and management. The available courses include laboratory studies, applied mathematics, engineering analysis, engineering design and a variety of introductory and advanced level courses in various areas of engineering and applied science and construction management. The department also participates in an interdisciplinary graduate program in engineering management leading to the Master of Science, M.S. degree.

Mission

Please refer to Admission under Special Regulations for the school.

Master's Degree

Graduate students plan their program in consultation with an adviser and may elect to pursue a broad Master of Science (M.S.) degree program without specific concentration or to major in one of the areas identified above. The minimum requirements for the master's programs in civil engineering are the successful completion of 30 semester credit hours. Maximum flexibility scope of studies is afforded by utilization of courses offered in departments of the university or other area universities through the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area.

Doctoral Degree Programs

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree in civil engineering plan their program in consultation with an adviser. The program of studies is tailored individually to meet the needs of the student and the academic and professional standards of the department. Maximum flexibility in scope studies is afforded by utilization of courses offered in other departments of the university or other area universities through the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area.

Other requirements for the doctoral degree program follow those established for the school. Please refer to Degree Requirements.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

CE Course Title
501 Advanced Mechanics of Solids
502 Introductions to Continuum Mechanics
503 Introductions to Elasticity
504 Street-Strain Behavior of Soils
511 Applied Plastic Design and Limit Analysis
514 Advanced Vibrations and Structural Dynamics
516 Prestressed Concrete
520 Design of Structural Systems
524 Matrix and Computer Methods in Structural Analysis
525 Nondestructive Evaluation and Condition Assessment of Structures
534 Disaster Mitigating Design and Practice for the Developing World I
535 Disaster Mitigating Design and Practice for the Developing World II
541 Environmental Engineering Chemistry
542 Environmental Chemistry Laboratory
543 Environmental Microbiology and Biological Processes
555 Environmental Law and Policy
556 Sustainable Development Principles and Practice
560 Case Studies in Geotechnical and Geo-environmental Engineering
562 Seapage and Slope Stability
570 Innovative Infrastructure Management
571 Pavement Theory and Design
572 Intelligent Transportation Systems
573 Traffic Engineering and Flow Theory
575 Introduction to Systems Analysis
576 Systems Design
579 Harbors and Coastal Engineering
581 Practical Construction Law
582 Value Engineering
587 Estimating and Bidding
588 Construction Operational Management
589 Construction Scheduling Techniques
590 Construction Operational Analysis
591 Engineering Hdrogeology and Groundwater Flow
592 Groundwater Contamination: Simulation and Regulations
593 Applied Hydrology
595 Water Supply Engineering
596 Waste Treatment Engineering
598 Hazardous Waste Treatment
603 Inelastic Stress Analysis
604 Constitutive Modeling of Frictional Materials
611 Management Information Systems and GIS in Civil Engineering
614 Earthquake Engineering and Seismic Design
615 Soil Dynamics and Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering
622 Variational Methods in Engineering
670 Risk and Reliability in CE Systems
675 Advanced Operations Research
714 Passive and Active Control of Large Structural Systems
732 Theoretical Hydrodynamics
767 Advanced Geotechnical and Structural Systems
797 Special Topics
798 Special Topics
995 Thesis-Masters
996 Thesis-Masters
997 Dissertation-Doctoral
998 Dissertation-Doctoral

Engineering Management Program

Director: Jeffrey E. Giangiuli, MSE

Adjunct Associate Professors: Alan B. Carr; Jeffrey E. Fernandez; Larry D. Ferreiro; Jeffrey E. Giangiuli; Boyd A. Jones; Michael P. Kushner; S.A. Mohsberg III; William Newnam; Donald Purcell; Matthew D. Sermon 
 
Mission
 
The Engineering Management Program offers students the opportunity to earn a Certificate in Engineering Management or a Master of Science degree. The Engineering Management Program curriculum enhances management performance, develops managerial skills, and promotes the use of technology and engineering techniques to resolve the production, operations, regulatory, and financial issues facing today's professional in business, industry and government. It is designed to provide the student with knowledge of the theory and practice of management as it specifically pertains to engineering and technology-oriented organizations and activities. The program is oriented to the management of engineering processes within the broader context of a company or agency enterprise.

Master of Science (Engineering Management)

The Master of Science curriculum enhances management performance and develops managerial skills. It is designed to provide the student with knowledge of the theory and practice of management as it specifically pertains to engineering and technology-oriented organizations and activities. The program is oriented to the management of engineering processes within the boarder context of a company or agency enterprise. Three tracks are offered to allow the student to focus on their career preference:

Engineering Management and Organization

Developed to provide a graduate-level foundation for the practice of managing engineering organizations. It is appropriate for those that will assume leadership positions in technically oriented organizations.

Project and Systems Engineering Management

Developed to provide a graduate level foundation for the practice of managing projects associated with development and life cycle management of a product. It is appropriate for project managers and system engineers in management roles or those that will be in those positions.

Technology Management

Developed to provide a graduate-level foundation for the practice of managing technology development, implementation of sustainment activities. It is appropriate for those that will assume leadership positions in technology development or sustainment organizations.

Each track has seven core courses that give the foundation for engineering management and electives that allow students to focus their degree to their personal career plan. Nine semester hours (three courses) are used to tailor the degree program to the student's specific needs.

The Master of Science (Engineering Management) degree program requires completion of 30 semester credit hours. The School of Engineering offers a wide range of specialties relating to mechanical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, computer science, and biomedical engineering. Elective courses up to six credits may be transferred from accredited educational institutions into the program. Our partnership with the Nuclear Power Directorate allows transfer of 12 credits for completion of the U.S. Navy Officer Nuclear Power School Program.

The engineering management master's degree program results in an engineering/scientific degree, rather than a business degree; therefore the program candidate should have an engineering, physical science or mathematics degree with appropriate technical or engineering experience. (Depending on experience, candidates without mathematics-based degree may be accepted for the program. Prerequisites may be required.)

A minimum of 30 semester credit hours is required, but a thesis is not required. All M.S. candidates for graduation must have earned at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in courses leading to the degree. For more information go to http://engineering.cua.edu/engrmgmt.

Certificate of Engineering Management

Four Professional Certificates are available:

Engineering Management Professional Certificate Designed to provide specialized graduate-level education and to further professional continuing education for those persons who will assume major administrative positions in industry or government organizations.

Program Management Professional Certificate Designed to provide specialized graduate-level education and to further professional continuing education or certification (beyond or prior to Project Management Institute certification) for those who will act as program or product managers in industry and government.

Systems Engineering Professional Certificate Designed to provide specialized graduate-level education and to further professional continuing education or certification (beyond or prior to International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) certification) for those persons who will act as the technical/systems engineering lead in major programs, organizations or functions in industry or government.

Management of Information Technology Professional Certificate Designed to provide specialized graduate-level education and to further professional continuing education or certification for those persons who will be responsible for management of information technology resources in industry and government.

These certificate programs provide an understanding of the core engineering management theory and tools that underpin technical management practices.

The Engineering Management Professional Certificate is awarded upon successful completion of 15 semester credit hours (five courses) of key program courses. To meet student needs one course could be substituted by an appropriate elective course from the CUA School of Engineering or an approved transferred course. A transferred course must be a B grade or better. The certificate is awarded after completion with a grade of C or better in all CUA courses counted toward the certificate requirements.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

CMGT Course Title
505 Decision Analysis
508 Technology Management
510 Information Systems for Managers
515 Software Project Management
547 Managerial Engineering Economics
561 Engineering Ergonomics
562 Engineering Risk Management
570 Project Management
572 Organizational Theory and Behavior
573 Planning and Control of Organizations
574 Strategic Management
575 Introduction to Systems Analysis
580 Introduction to Systems Engineering Management

 

Class Locations

Engineering Management classes are held at the Crystal City Crowne Plaza Hotel or on the CUA campus in northeast DC. The degrees offered at off campus sites have been approved by the governing board of CUA and are equivalent to those given on campus. The State Council of Higher Education for Virginia (SCHEV) has certified the CUA School of Engineering to operate in Virginia.

 

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Professors Mohammed Arozullah; Nader Namazi; Charles C. Nguyen; Philip A. Regalia,Chair
Professors Emeriti Andrew G. Favret; George E. McDuffie; Robert Meister
Associate Professors Scott Mathews; Ozlem Kilic
Assistant Professors Lin-Ching Chang; Jae Choi; Esam ElDin Aly El-Araby; Erion Plaku; Yi Yang
Lecturers Ravindra Athaleh; Kiran Bhutani; Charles Campbell Jr.; Vincent Cassella; Ajaz Ejaz; Francis Linehan; Saiid Gangalizadeh; Elsayed Mansour; Lawrence Schuette; Edward Moses; Robert Schell; David Tremper; Steven Weiss; David Vargas

The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science, M.S., and Doctor of Philosophy, Ph.D. Programs offered are Computer Graphics, Communication Systems and Networks, Microwave, Optics and Materials, and Signal and Image Processing.

The faculty is actively engaged in several research areas including computer graphic display of medical images, Web-based communication, ATM-based high-speed networks, computer and satellite communications, interaction of electromagnetic radiation with biological systems, image microoptical devices, image motion detection and estimation, communication intelligence, information visualization, biomedical imaging, computational intelligence and image understanding. A majority of the research projects is funded by industries and government agencies such as NASA, the Navy, the Army, NIH, and NSF.

Admission

Students pursuing degree programs should apply for regular admission. The minimum requirement for regular admission to the M.S. program is a bachelor's degree in engineering, science or mathematics from an accredited institution. Students lacking certain requirements for regular admission to the M.S. program can apply for a provisional admission.

Performance of provisional students will be reviewed after two semesters of graduate study for possible transfer to regular admission. The minimum requirements for regular admission to the M.S. program in computer science is a bachelor's degree with undergraduate background in computer science that includes the equivalent of the following topics: data structures, computer organization and assembly language, programming languages, theoretical computer science, and discrete structures. A student will be provisionally admitted to the M.S. program if he or she has one or more deficiencies. The deficiency courses must be successfully completed before the provisional status is converted to regular status. Admission to the doctoral degree programs is based upon academic performance at the bachelor and master's levels. For other admission requirements, please refer to Admission under Special Regulations.

M.S. Program

Two options are available in the M.S. program. The nonthesis option requires 30 semester credit hours of approved coursework. The thesis option requires a minimum of 24 semester credit hours of approved coursework plus a thesis comprising six semester credit hours of master's thesis guidance. The approved coursework must include at least 18 semester credit hours of approved electrical engineering courses. The remaining courses must be in engineering and science disciplines and approved by the graduate coordinator of the department.

The M.S. degree program in computer science has two options, the thesis option and the nonthesis option. For both options, each student must submit a program of study to the department for approval upon entering the program. The program of study must contain a minimum of 30 semester credit hours of approved graduate-level courses comprising at least 18 semester credit hours of core courses and 12 semester credit hours of elective courses.

The core courses must be selected from courses in four areas of concentration: computer science foundations, computer systems, software systems, and computing methodologies, such that at least three semester credit hours are chosen from each of the above areas of concentration.

Doctoral Degree Program

The program of studies is individually tailored to meet the needs of the student and to fit with the department research areas and facilities. Students must pass a comprehensive examination in three major areas after completing all required coursework.

The Ph.D. degree requires a minimum of 53 semester hours of formal graduate coursework beyond the bachelor's degree. The major includes at least nine semester credit hours at the 600-700 levels in three areas. Additional areas that must meet minimum requirements are chosen in consultation with the adviser. For additional degree requirements, see Degree Requirements.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

EE Course Title
501 Communication and Computer Network Simulation
514 Hardware Accelerated Computing
515 Digital Signal Processing
522 Linear System Analysis
531 Computer and Data Communications Networks
540 Microwave Antenna and Design
541 Applied Electromagnetics
542 Optoelectronics and Fiber Optics
548 Optical Signal and Image Processing
561 Random Signal Theory
572 Basics of Information Coding & Transmission
617 Adaptive Signal Processing
618 Optimum Signal Processing
621 Fundamentals of Kalman Filtering
625 System Optimization
627 Neural Networks and Bioinformatics
634 Digital Image Processing
644 Optical Communications
645 Optical Communication Networks
646 Optical Internet
647 Intelligent Broadband Multimedia Networks
652 Wireless Communications
656 Digital Communications
671 Statistical Signal Processing
696 Independent Study
710 Wavelet Theory and Applications
712 Communication Theory
717 Advances in Adaptive Signal Processing
731 Computer Communication Networks
740 Numerical Methods in Electromagnetics
746 Electromagnetic Radiation and Scattering
771 Detection and Estimation Theory
791,792 Electrical Engineering Research
995,996 Master's Thesis Guidance
997,998 Doctoral Dissertation Guidance


 

CSC Course Title
504 Compiler Construction
507 Unix System Programming
508 X Window Programming
509 Web Design & Programming
511 Computational Complexity
513 Fundamentals of Computer Graphics
520 Topics in Computer Science
522 Operating Systems
523 Introduction to Computer Networks
524 Secure Programming
525 Embedded Systems Programming
531 Data Communication Networks
532 System Simulation
533 Optimization
541 Database Systems
551 Pattern Recognition
564 Software Engineering
581 Cryptography & Stenography
582 Game Programming
592 Directed Study
611 Logic for Computing Scientists
612 Analysis of Algorithms
613 Combinatorial Algorithms and Intractability
621 Computer Networks
622 Advanced Operating Systems
623 Real-Time Systems
624 Computer and Network Security
633 Software Requirements and Specifications
635 Software Verification, Validation, and Testing
636 Distributed Computing
641 Data Mining
642 Artificial Intelligence
643 Computer Graphics
650 Intelligent Multimedia
651 Multimedia Processing and Information Retrieval
665 Information Security
671 Cyber Security Laws, Ethics & Policies
675 Visual Intelligence and Computer Vision
681 Security Architecture & Analysis
691 Advance Computer Architecture
696 Independent Study
728 Information Visualization
775 Human-Computer Interface
791,792 Directed Research
797 Master's Dissertation
991 Graduate Design
995,996 Master's Thesis Guidance
997,998 Doctoral Dissertation

 

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Professor Sen Nieh, Chair
Professors Emeriti Frank A. Andrews; Mario J. Casarella; Edward D. Jordan; Yun Chow Whang
Clinical Associate Professor Jandro Abot
Adjunct Professors George Mattingly, Tse-Fou Zien
Associate Professor J. Steven Brown;John A. Judge; Joseph Vignola; Zhaoyang Wang
Adjunct Associate Professor Tuan Nguyen
Adjunct Assistant Professor Sivakumar Tadikonda
Lecturers Jeffrey Didion; Ronald Driggers; Benjamin Dzikonicz; William LaPlante; Mamta Nagajaja; Diego Turo; Adam Wolfe; K. Yaruz

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers graduate programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science , M.S., and Doctor of Philosophy, Ph.D. The programs are:

Professional Master's Program

For recent graduates and practicing engineers interested in specialized areas to enhance their careers, the program emphasizes advances in existing and emerging technologies. Master's thesis is optional.

Master's Program (predoctoral)

For students interested in pursuing Ph.D. degree a master's thesis is strongly recommended.

Doctoral Program

For students pursuing a Ph.D. degree, this program emphasizes strong foundations in mechanical engineering as well as advanced topics in a specialized area of concentration.

Research Areas

  • Acoustics
  • Active Control and Smart Materials/Systems
  • Advanced and Non-Linear Dynamics
  • Air Pollution Control and Indoor Air Quality

  • Clean Energy Production and Use

  • Combustion and Multiphase Systems
  • Composite Materials
  • Computational Methods (FEM and CFD)
  • Electronic Packaging

  • Flow Induced Vibration and Noise Reduction

  • Heat/Mass Transfer and Thermodynamics

  • HVAC and Refrigeration

  • MEMS

  • Nano-Mechanics and Sensors

  • Solar Wind and Magnetohydrodynamics

  • Structural Mechanics
  • Three-Dimensional Images
  • Vibration of Mechanical Systems

Admission

Please refer to Admission under Special Regulations.

Master's Degree Program

Candidates for graduate studies plan their program in consultation with an adviser. Maximum flexibility in scope of studies is afforded by utilization of courses offered in other departments of the university or other area universities through the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. Requirements for the master's degree programs follow those established for the school with the specification of  ENGR 520 - Mathematical Analysis for Graduate Students and one of the following two courses, ENGR 516 - Computational Methods for Graduate Students or ENGR 518 - Experimental Techniques for Graduate Students. The department offers the following areas of specialty: 1) Energy and Environment, 2) Acoustics, Vibrational Structures and 3) Nano-mechanics and MEMS. Please refer to Degree Requirements.

Doctoral Degree Program

Requirements for the doctoral degree program follow those established for the school. Please refer to Degree Requirements. Note the comprehensive examination is directed at assessing a student's preparation in advanced topics for doctoral research, and understanding of the research literature and his or her ability to define the frontiers of the proposed areas of investigation. The department offers two areas of specialty for doctoral study: 1) Thermal-Fluid Sciences, and 2) Mechanics, Acoustical and Nano Systems.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

ENGR Course Title
501 Introduction to Mechatronics
503 Control Systems
504 Modern Control Systems
510 Strategic Standardization
516 Computational Methods for Grad Students
518 Experimental Techniques for Grad Students
520 Mathematical Analysis for Grad Students
522 Mechanical Properties of Materials
526 Electrical Properties of Materials
538 Introduction to Environmental Engineering
540 Reliability Engineering
565 Nonlinear Dynamics and Chaos
575 Intro Systems Analysis
ME Course Title
502 Intro to Electronic Packaging and MEMS
503 Structural Mechanics
504  Finite Element Methods
510 Modern Control Systems
512 Digital Controls
521 Advanced Active Vibration Control
526 Alternative Energy Engineering
529 Environmental Protection for Energy Systems
530 Applied Energy Systems
531 Thermal Power Engineering I
532 Design of Power and Propulsion Systems
533 Energy Conservation and HVAC
534 Design of HVAC and Refrigeration
535 Design and Optimization of Thermal Systems
536 Thermal Environmental Engineering
537 Air Pollution and Control 
539 Combustion and Incineration
540 Intro to Combustion Engineering
541 Conduction and Radiation
542 Heat Convection
543 Heat Exchanger: Design and Analysis
544 Introduction to Multiphase Systems
547 Intermediate Thermodynamics
548 Intermediate Heat Transfer
549 Intermediate Fluid Mechanics
550 Combustion and Waste Management
551 Infrared Systems
552 Introduction to Flight Dynamics
553 Fundamentals of Flight
554 Aerospace Design
557 Advanced Dynamics
558 Introduction to Ocean Engineering
560 Introduction to Acoustics
561 Acoustica and Wave Propagation
564 Structural Acoustics
566 Advanced Vibrations and Structural Dynamics I
567 Underwater Acoustics
569 Acoustic Measurements
573 IRS Imaging Systems
580 Introduction to MEMS and Microfabrications
582 Intro to Mechanical Fundamentals of Electrical Sys
584 Introduction to Nanotechnology
592 Experimental Vibration and Acoustics
620 Advanced Mathematics
622 Turbulence
640 Advanced Thermodynamics
642 Advanced Heat Transfer
645 Advanced Fluid Dynamics
647 Multiphase Flows
648 Heat Exchangers-Theory and Applications
652 Advanced Flight Dynamics
654 Computational Structural Mechanics
657 Advanced Dynamics
660 Intermediate Acoustics
661 Acoustics Meterology & Materials
662 Advanced Vibration
664 Modal Analysis
666 Advanced Vibrations and Structural Dynamics II
669 Nonlinear Vibration
701 Advanced Finite Element Method: Theory and Applications
703 Advanced Problems in Vibration and Acoustics
704 Advanced Vibration II
721 Advanced Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)
724 Advanced Engineering Thermodynamics
726 Advanced Combustion and Multiphase Systems
728 Advanced Problems in Pollution Control
732 Laminar Boundry Layers
733 Turbulent Flows
738 Advanced Gas Dynamics
741 Advanced Problems in Thermal Sciences
751 Advanced Topics in Vibration Control
752 Advanced Topics in Mechanics
756 Advanced Problems in Controls
758 Advanced Problems in Structural Mechanics
760 Advanced Topics in Acoustics
761 Acoustic Imaging

Footnotes