The Catholic University of America

School of Theology and Religious Studies

Officers of Instruction

Faculty

 

Rev. Mark Morozowich, S.E.O.D. 
Acting Dean and Associate Professor 
Charles B. Jones, M.T.S., Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and Associate Professor
Msgr. Stephen Rossetti, Ph.D, D.Min.
Associate Dean for Seminary and Ministerial Programs and Clinical Associate Professor
Karen Korol, M.A. Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Studies
Rev. Regis Armstrong, O.F.M. Cap., M.Div., M.Th., MS.Ed., Ph.D.
The John C. and Gertrude P. Hubbard Professor of Religious Studies
William Barbieri, Ph.D. Associate Professor and Director, Religion and Culture
Rev. Christopher Begg, S.T.D., Ph.D.
The Katherine Drexel Professor of Religious Studies
Joshua Benson, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Christopher J. Born, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor
David A. Bosworth, Ph.D. Assistant Professor
Joseph Capizzi, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Director, Moral Theology/Ethics
Sister Mary Collins, O.S.B., Ph.D. Professor Emerita
Rev. Richard Dellilio Clinical Associate Professor
Rev. Alexander A. Di Lella, O.F.M., S.T.L., S.S.L., Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus
William Dinges, Ph.D.
Professor

Rev. Joseph A. Fitzmyer, S.J., S.T.L., S.S.L., Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus
Rev. John T. Ford, C.S.C., M.A., S.T.D.
Professor, Director of Historical and Systematic Theology, and Coordinator, Hispanic/Latino Studies Program
Rev. John P. Galvin, Dr. Theol.
Professor
Rev. Francis T. Gignac, S.J., M.A., S.T.L., D.Phil.
Professor and Director, Biblical Studies
John Grabowski, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Rev. Patrick Granfield, O.S.B., Ph.D., S.T.D.
Professor Emeritus
Rev. Jacques Gres-Gayer, Dr. Theol., Dr. Hist.
Professor
Rev. John Paul Heil, M.Div., S.S.L., S.S.D.
Professor
Msgr. Kevin W. Irwin, S.T.D.
Monsignor Walter J. Schmitz Professor of Liturgical Studies
Rev. Joseph Jensen, O.S.B., S.S.L., S.T.D.
Professor
Rev. Brian V. Johnstone, C.SS.R., S.T.L., S.T.D., Ph.D.
The Warren Blanding Professor of Moral Theology
Sister Margaret Kelleher, O.S.U., Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Rev. Joseph A. Komonchak, S.T.L., Ph.D. Professor Emeritus
Teresa Lafferty, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor
William P. Loewe, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Rev. Nicholas Lombardo, M.Div., S.T.B., Ph.D. Assistant Professor
Hellen Mardaga, Ph.D., S.T.D. Assistant Professor
Rev. Berard Marthaler, O.F.M. Conv., S.T.D., Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus
Rev. Frank J. Matera, Ph.D.
The Andrews-Kelly-Ryan Professor of Biblical Studies
William C. Mattison III, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Rev. Paul G. McPartlan, M.A., S.T.L., D.Phil.
The Carl J. Peter Professor of Systematic Theology
Robert D. Miller, Ph.D. Associate Professor
Nelson H. Minnich, S.T.B., Ph.D.
Professor
Rev. Romuald Meogrossi, O.F.M., Conv., Ph.D. Assistant Clinical Professor
Rev. Francis J. Moloney, S.D.B., S.T.D., S.S.L., D.Phil.
Professor Emeritus
Chad C. Pecknold, Ph.D. Assistant Professor
Rev. David N. Power, O.M.I., S.T.D.
Professor Emeritus
Michael Root, M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D. Professor
Christopher J. Ruddy, Ph.D. Associate Professor
Sister Margaret Schreiber, O.P., S.T.D. Assistant Professor
Rev. Dominic Serra, S.L.D.
Associate Professor and Director, Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology
Rev. Raymond Studzinski, O.S.B., Ph.D.
Associate Professor and Director, Pastoral Studies
Tarmo Toom, Ph.D. Associate Professor
Monsignor Robert Trisco, Hist. Eccl. D.
Professor Emeritus
Wilhelmus Valkenberg, M.Div., Ph.D. Professor
Susan Wessel, Ph.D.
Associate Professor and director, Church History
Joseph M. White, Ph.D. Associate Professor
Rev. James Wiseman, O.S.B., S.T.D.
Professor and Director, Spirituality
Rev. Michael Witczak, S.L.D.
Associate Professor

 

Associates of the Faculty

 

Very Rev. Chorbishop Seely Beggiani, S.T.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor
Rev. Gerard Sloyan, S.T.D., Ph.D.
Distinguished Lecturer

 

University Seminary (Theological College)

Rev. Phillip J. Brown, S.S., J.D., S.T.B., J.C.D.
Rector
Rev. Gerald D. McBrearity, S.S., M.A., S.T.B., D.Min.
 Vice Rector
Rev. Martin Burham, M.A., M.Div., S.T.B. (S.S. Cand.)  
Rev. James Froehlich, OFM Cap., M.A., Ph.D.  
Rev. Daniel Greenleaf, S.T.L.,
 
Rev. Anthony J. Pogorelc, S.S., M.Div., Ph.D.
 
Rev. John Slovikovski, S.S. Cand.  
Rev. David D. Thayer, S.S., S.T.L., Ph.D.
 
Donna Leo
Treasurer
Jane O'Brien
Development Director

 

 

Lecture Series

The Mary Charles Bryce, O.S.B., Lecture in Religious Education
The Johannes Quasten Lecture
The Cardinal John Dearden Lecture
The Catholic Daughters of the Americas Lecture
Lecture in Jewish Culture and Religious Affairs
The Thomas Verner Moore Lecture, cosponsored with St. Anselm's Abbey
Lectures associated with the Endowed Chairs
The Roland E. Murphy Lecture in Biblical Studies

Endowed Professorships

The Shakespeare Caldwell-Duval Professor of Theology. The founders professorship is supported by gifts donated by or honoring the following benefactors: Shakespeare Caldwell (May 1885), Francis A. Drexel (July 1888) and George L. Duval.

The Andrews-Kelly-Ryan Professor of Biblical Studies. The Andrews-Kelly-Ryan Professorship is supported by gifts donated by or honoring the following benefactors: Dr. Thomas F. Andrews (March 1901), Margaret Hughes Kelly (November 1889) and James J. and Hannah Cusack Ryan (November 1911).

The Warren-Blanding Professor of Religion and Culture. The Warren-Blanding Professorship was established by the Riley J. and Lillian N. Warren and Beatrice W. Blanding Foundation in January 1973.

The Catholic Daughters of the Americas Professor in American Church History. The professorship and endowment was established by the Catholic Daughters of the Americas in August 1975.

The John C. and Gertrude P. Hubbard Professor of Religious Studies. This professorship was established in October 1989 by Gertrude P. Hubbard in memory of her husband, Dr. John C. Hubbard, a former professor at this university, from The Dr. John Charles Hubbard and Gertrude Pardieck Hubbard Endowment.

The Carl J. Peter Professor of Systematic Theology and Ecumenism. The Peter professorship was established in 1995 to honor the memory of the Rev. Carl J. Peter, former dean of the School of Theology and Religious Studies (1977-1985). The holder of the chair lectures in those areas of theology to which Father Peter devoted his life of research, service and teaching.

The Monsignor Walter J. Schmitz, S.S., Professor of Liturgical Studies. The Very Rev. Walter J. Schmitz, S.S., Chair of Liturgical Studies was established in 1995 through a bequest from the estate of Father Schmitz, a former dean of the School of Sacred Theology.

The Katharine Drexel Professor of Religious Studies. The Katharine Drexel Chair in Religious Studies was established in 1997 to honor the memory of a woman who devoted her efforts to the work of evangelization and charity within the nation's native and African-American populations.

Student Endowments

Financial support for graduate study is listed elsewhere, along with specific funding for the School of Theology and Religious Studies: namely, Tuition Remission for Seminarians; Scholarships for Women Religious; The Catholic School Teacher's Tuition Waiver; Divinity Hall Burses; The Very Reverend Walter J. Schmitz Scholarship; The Johannes Quasten Scholarship; The McShain Scholarships for Seminarians; and The Hubbard Dissertation Fellowships. New endowments include the following:

The Monsignor John Tracy Ellis Scholarship Fund. This fund was established in July 1985 on the 80th birthday of Monsignor John Tracy Ellis, professor of church history at Catholic University until his retirement in 1989. The award is made to students studying church history. The present endowment may be augmented by gifts from alumni and other donors.

Albert and Martha Senn Scholarship Fund. This award is made to students in theology in memory of the grandparents of an alumnus of the university.

Sisters Virginia and Elizabeth Sloyan Scholarship Fund. This award, established as an endowment in 2002 by an anonymous donor, is made to M.A. level students in the field of religious education.

Third World Scholarships. This fund was established in 1984 by the late Dean Carl J. Peter for students from the Third World. The major contributor is Missionhurst, American IHM Province. Consequently, recipients are called the "Missionhurst Scholars." Other contributors include the Augustinian Fathers, Paulist Fathers, and Precious Blood Fathers. The present endowment may be augmented by gifts from religious communities and other donors.

Avery Cardinal Dulles, S.J., Scholarship Fund in Theology. The selection of students for this scholarship is to be confined to those who have shown outstanding potential to succeed in their graduate studies and have been accepted into the university's doctoral programs in theology. First preference will be given to scholars who are Catholic priests and religious.

Quasten Medal

The Johannes Quasten Medal for Excellence in Scholarship and Leadership in Religious Studies was established in 1985 by Dean William Cenkner, O.P. The medal is named for Professor Johannes Quasten, the renowned patristic scholar who was a member of the faculty from 1938 to his retirement in 1979. The medal is awarded to extern scholars whose excellence in research and leadership is acknowledged in the academic world.

 

Rev. Jeremy Driscoll, O.S.B.
Rev. Jared Wicks, S.J.
Rev. Gerard S. Sloyan
E. Glenn Hinson
Rev. Louis Bouyer
Robert A. Markus
David Herlihy
Rev. Robert Taft, S.J.
Hermann J. Pottmeyer
John T. Noonan
Rev. Joseph A. Fitzmyer, S.J.
Gerald Bonner
Rev. David Tracy
Rev. Raymond E. Brown, S.S.
Rev. Virgilio Elizondo
Rev. Berard Marthaler, O.F.M. Conv.
Rev. John O'Malley, S.J.
Rev. Lawrence G. Wrenn
Bernard McGinn
Rev. Cyprian Davis, O.S.B.
Brian Tierney
Rev. John R. Donahue, S.J.
Geoffrey Wainwright
Rev. Gerald O'Collins, S.J.
Metropolitan Kallistos Ware

History

From its foundation The Catholic University of America has given academic priority to theology and religious studies and related disciplines. Initially the academic programs in these areas were offered in the School of Sacred Sciences (1889). In time there emerged the School of Canon Law (1923), followed by the Seminary Program (1931) and, within the School of Arts and Sciences, the Department of Religion (1932). The original School of Sacred Sciences was later divided into The School of Sacred Theology and The School of Philosophy (1937). In 1970 The Liturgical Studies Program was instituted. After an extensive review of programs and structures, the Board of Trustees approved a recommendation by the Academic Senate to establish a new School of Religious Studies in September 1973. The school was composed of five departments: biblical studies, canon law, church history, religion and religious education, and theology. In 2002, the Board of Trustees, after the recommendation of the Academic Senate, voted that the canon law department be reestablished as the School of Canon Law and that the remaining academic units of the school become programs in the School of Theology and Religious Studies. By thus coordinating existing units, The Catholic University of America established the School of Theology and Religious Studies as a national center of academic research, instruction and service.

Goals

The mission of The Catholic University of America is to render service in the United States as an intellectual center of the highest quality where every dimension of truth, natural and revealed, can be examined with competent expertise. The university seeks in particular to maintain a position of excellence in biblical and liturgical studies, church history, religion and culture, religious education, ethics, spirituality, and theology. The university accords priority to theology and to religious studies and to programs that explore the Roman Catholic tradition of humanistic learning and that study its relevance to the needs of society and the Church.

To help realize the mission of the university, the School of Theology and Religious Studies sets itself two goals, namely, to promote excellence in teaching, research, and publication in the area of theology and religious studies, and to provide the professional training of lay and clerical leaders who will serve the Roman Catholic community in the United States and throughout the world. In pursuit of these goals, the school places emphasis on an interdisciplinary approach and collaboration with other schools of the university, on the ecumenical and interreligious dimensions of all theological studies, on the exploration of relations between religion and culture, and on the promotion of informed efforts to work for justice and peace, both within the Church and in the world, in the light of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Degree Programs

To respond to the needs of the Church in the world, the School of Theology and Religious Studies offers ecclesiastical, civil and pastoral degrees. The School of Theology and Religious Studies offers ecclesiastical degrees (S.T.B., S.T.L., S.T.D.) in the fields of biblical theology, liturgical studies and sacramental theology, moral theology, and historical and systematic theology. It offers civil degrees (M.A., Ph.D.) in the fields of biblical studies, church history, historical theology (Ph.D. only), liturgical studies/sacramental theology, moral theology/ethics, religious education/catechetics, religion and culture, spirituality, and systematic theology.

It has developed pastoral degrees in the fields of religious education/catechetics (M.R.E.), Catholic theology and Hispanic ministry (M.Div.), and adult spiritual formation, liturgical studies, pastoral care and counseling (D.Min.).

Certificates are offered in the fields of Hispanic pastoral leadership and pastoral studies. There are programs offered in conjunction with the School of Arts and Sciences, Department of Education, for an M.A. degree in Catholic educational leadership. There is also a joint degree program offered with the School of Library and Information Science (M.A./M.S.L.S). For admission criteria, degree requirements and course offerings, see the program descriptions below.

Ecclesiastical Degree Programs

The School of Theology and Religious Studies is an ecclesiastical faculty. In virtue of its accreditation by the Holy See, programs leading to certain degrees in theology (S.T.B., S.T.L., S.T.D.) are recognized as having canonical effects. Such programs satisfy both the norms established by the Holy See and the usual university requirements.

Since 1931, the sequence of Baccalaureate (S.T.B.), Licentiate (S.T.L.), and Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), degrees has been regulated by uniform norms observed by Catholic faculties and universities throughout the world. In 1979, Pope John Paul II promulgated an apostolic Constitution, Sapientia Christiana, which currently governs the granting of ecclesiastical degrees.

By offering these degrees, the program preserves a theological heritage and strives for eminence in a developing community of Catholic faculties and universities aspiring to academic cooperation that transcends national and cultural boundaries.

The ecclesiastical degrees provide a theological education focused upon research. For many years they were awarded almost exclusively to those preparing for the reception of Holy Orders in the Roman Catholic Church and those wishing to acquire further theological competency after ordination. For several decades, however, all qualified men and women have been welcomed into the program and have earned these academic degrees in theology in order to prepare themselves for a wide variety of roles and ministries in the Church and world.

These degrees are offered by the following academic areas: Historical and Systematic Theology, Liturgical Studies and Sacramental Theology, and Moral Theology/Ethics.

Bachelor of Sacred Theology, S.T.B.

The S.T.B. degree provides the student with the opportunity to attain a broad theological orientation at the graduate level. This is a prerequisite for the further specialization of the licentiate, S.T.L., which in this degree sequence presupposes familiarity with the wide variety of subject matter and disciplines that constitute the Christian theological tradition.

 

Admission

1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university.

2. Superior achievement and the ability to pursue graduate work as indicated by official transcripts from previous institutions of study.

3. The results of the Graduate Record Examination, GRE, or Miller Analogies Test, MAT. However, GRE scores (vs. MAT or TOEFL) are necessary for applicants to be considered for most university scholarships.

4. Non-native English-speakers should demonstrate evidence of English proficiency through submission of Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores or through some other means.

5. At least three academic letters of recommendation.

6. An undergraduate foundation in philosophy (18 credits), which includes a demonstrated background in the following areas: history of philosophy, logic, metaphysics, ethics, philosophy of God and philosophical anthropology.

7. An undergraduate background in religious studies that has provided an introduction to Old Testament literature and an introduction to New Testament literature.

8. A reading knowledge of Latin.

 

Degree Requirements

 

Coursework

A minimum of 69 semester hours of credit is required according to the following distribution:

1. The Pro-seminar for master's students ordinarily should be taken in the first semester.

2. Foundational--21 credits: History and Method in Theology (3), Foundations of Christian Moral Life (3), Introduction to Patristic Theology (3), Foundations of Liturgy and Sacraments (3), Pastoral Theology (3), Introduction to Christian Spirituality (3), Basic Principles of Canon Law (3). Introduction to History and Method in Theology and Foundations of Christian Moral Life must be taken by S.T.B. students during the first year in the program.

3. Systematic theology--15 credits, selected from: Revelation and Faith (3), Theology of God (3), Christian Anthropology (3), Christology (3), Theology of the Church (3), Mariology (3),, Christian Eschatology (3).

4. Liturgical studies and sacramental theology--six credits, selected from: Sacraments of Initiation (3), Eucharist (3), Sacraments of Reconciliation and Anointing (3), Ordained Ministries (3).

5. Moral theology--nine credits: Marriage (3), Christian Social and Political Ethics (3), Biomedical Ethics (3).

6. Scripture--15 credits: two courses from Old Testament offerings (6), two courses from New Testament offerings (6), one course chosen from either set of offerings (3). These courses are to be chosen from the following: Pentateuch; Prophets; Psalms; Wisdom Literature; Synoptics; John; Pauline Letters.

7. Church history--three credits: one course chosen from the appropriate offerings.

8. Students who are candidates for priesthood in the Roman Catholic Church must take one course in a non-Roman Catholic ecclesial tradition during the course of studies.

Language Requirement

Students are expected to have a reading knowledge of Latin. Since Latin is considered a prerequisite, it must be satisfied by the end of the first fall semester in the program.

Course Load

Ministerial students are encouraged to take advantage of available pastoral courses. No student may carry a course load beyond 15 credit hours, inclusive of optional pastoral courses. With the approval of the dean, and under the condition that the course is not being offered in a given term, one course per term may ordinarily be taken outside the school. To ensure the academic integrity of the degree, only one course from each academic area may be taken outside the school.

Grade Point Average

The student must maintain a grade point average of 2.75 or above.

Comprehensive Examination

To qualify for the comprehensive examination, the student must have satisfied the Latin requirement and have a grade point average of 2.75 or above. The awarding of the S.T.B. degree also depends on the successful completion of the comprehensive examination.

Usually the student takes the comprehensive examination during the sixth semester of study. The subject matter of the examination is material covered in the courses in systematic and sacramental theology, moral theology and Scripture. Past exam questions and a list of themes and readings for review are available from the Office of the Associate Dean for Seminary and Ministerial Studies.

Students may choose either three hours of written examination or one hour of oral examination before three members of the faculty. In order to pass the comprehensive exam, a student must receive an average grade of 2.5 (on a scale of 0 to 4.0) on the exam. A candidate for the S.T.B. degree may not continue candidacy after two failures in the comprehensive examination.

Residency

The residency requirement for the S.T.B. degree is six semesters in full-time enrollment or the equivalent.

Transfer Students

Students transferring into the School of Theology and Religious Studies from another institution may ask to have up to 33 credits applied to the S.T.B. degree from their former institution, provided that these credits are at the grade level B or higher and are comparable to those required by the S.T.B. degree, as administered by the school. The Associate Dean for Seminary and Ministerial Programs will make the final decision about the number of credits to be applied.

Licentiate in Sacred Theology, S.T.L.

The S.T.L. degree involves the development of appropriate methods of scientific investigation in theology, specialization in one area of theological concentration through a thesis, and a set of written and oral comprehensive examinations. The Licentiate in Sacred Theology has a long history that helps explain its present significance in this program and university. All its candidates must have completed a previous academic program calculated to engender a basic familiarity with the long history of Christian theological endeavors.

 Admission

Admission to the S.T.L. degree program is based on the following:

1. Possession of the S.T.B. degree from an ecclesiastical university or faculty or a comparable M.Div. or an M.A. or M.T.S. with coursework that is equivalent to that required for the S.T.B. at Catholic University. Such coursework must have been completed with a minimum grade point average of 3.0.

2. The results of the Graduate Record Examination, GRE, or Miller Analogies Test, MAT. However, GRE scores (and not the MAT) are necessary for applicants to be considered for most university scholarships.

3. Non-native English-speakers should demonstrate evidence of English proficiency through submission of Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores or through some comparable means.

4. At least three academic letters of recommendation.

5. A reading knowledge of Latin.

 Degree Requirements

Conditional Admission

The committee reserves the right to admit conditionally those applicants not meeting the above prerequisites. In such cases, the Admissions Committee will decide under what circumstances the conditions may be lifted.

Provisional Admission 

Students entering their seventh semester of theological study in the S.T.B. program who have obtained permission to delay their S.T.B. comprehensives until the scheduled dates may apply for provisional admission to the S.T.L. program, provided their cumulative grade point average is 3.0 or higher.

Coursework

Each student must successfully complete at least 24 credit hours of coursework on the 700 or 800 level. These required credits must be taken in the student's chosen academic area of major concentration, and normally will be from the school's course offerings. However, the student may take advantage of the broad offerings of the university in subjects useful for the specialization in theology by taking up to six semester hours in another school. In each instance the written approvals of Associate Dean for Graduate Studies and of the dean or chair of the other school or department are required.

Language Requirements

Candidates for the S.T.L. degree must fulfill the following language requirements before taking comprehensive examinations:

1. A reading knowledge of Latin. Since Latin is considered a prerequisite, it must be satisfied by the end of the first fall semester in the program.

2. Demonstration of proficiency in Biblical or theological Greek.

3. Reading ability in a modern language, either French or German. This requirement must be satisfied by the end of the semester before the candidate takes the comprehensive examination. With the agreement of the student's thesis director and subject to the approval of the faculty, a modern language other than French or German may fulfill the modern language requirement if the student's thesis research involves that language to a significant extent.

4. Because of the nature of the subject, an S.T.L. degree with a concentration in Biblical theology has additional Greek and Hebrew requirements. In addition to the 24 semester hours of coursework, two courses in Hebrew and two courses in Biblical Greek, both beyond the elementary level, will be considered prerequisites. These should be taken in the first two semesters of study.

S.T.L. Thesis Guidance

In addition to the minimum of 24 credit hours of coursework, each student must prepare and obtain final approval for a written thesis on a research project. The candidate will be expected to register for S.T.L. Thesis Guidance (TRS 993) for each of three successive semesters, beginning with the second semester of enrollment in the S.T.L. program. The purpose of thesis guidance is to direct the student in readings pertinent to the chosen areas of concentration, help the student prepare a thesis proposal, and guide the student in the writing of the thesis.

Course Load

The normal course load for S.T.L. work is nine hours per semester. Students sometimes take 12 hours of credit the first semester of study. Registration for two courses and S.T.L. Thesis Guidance is considered full-time status.

Thesis

Each candidate for the S.T.L. degree must write a thesis of 75 to 100 pages (approximately 20,000 to 25,000 words) which demonstrates ability to proceed further in scientific theological research. The thesis should give evidence of training in research and make a contribution to theological knowledge involving a limited, yet significant, problem of investigation. It must prove the candidate's familiarity with basic methods and techniques of research, technical mastery of the limited subject matter and ability to exercise sound theological judgment and to formulate accurate conclusions. The thesis proposal is approved by the director and reader and the academic area and then presented to the Ecclesiastical Degrees Committee. Normally, the proposal should be presented to the faculty before the end of the first year of residency (first semester of thesis guidance).

Upon completion of the thesis, the student will receive six credits. The director and the reader signify their approval in writing on the "Final Approval of Thesis" form available from the office of the associate dean for graduate studies. A student may not take the comprehensive examinations until such approval has been secured. After the student has successfully passed the oral comprehensive examination, he or she must deposit the original exemplar of the final form of the thesis in the office of the vice provost and dean of graduate studies.

Comprehensive Examinations

The student must successfully complete comprehensive examinations, both written and oral, which require relative mastery of the chosen concentration. To qualify for the comprehensive examinations, the student must have

1. maintained at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average,

2. completed all language requirements, and

3. received the approval of the director and reader of the thesis. The comprehensive examinations may not be taken before the midpoint of the final semester of residency (Oct. 31 or March 15).

The comprehensive examinations include an oral and a written test. The written examination will be based on a list of books in the student's area of concentration. The written examination will be four hours in duration and will be graded by the director and reader of the thesis plus one additional faculty member assigned by the academic area director. The student must receive a passing grade (at least 3.0) on the written comprehensives in order to proceed to the oral comprehensives.

The oral examination consists of an examination on the student's book list. It will be one hour in duration and will take place before the same examiners who previously had graded the written comprehensives.

The examination will be graded on the basis of a scale from 0 to 4. The final result will be the average of the scores given by each of the three examiners in a secret vote. An average of 3.0 is needed to pass.

A candidate for the S.T.L. degree may not continue candidacy after two failures in the comprehensive examinations.

Grade Point Average

Throughout the course of studies, a grade point average of 3.0 or higher must be maintained. In order to earn an S.T.L. degree, the student must obtain a cumulative grade (derived from the combined average of coursework, thesis and the comprehensive examination) of 3.0 or higher. To be eligible for acceptance into the S.T.D. program, however, a student must receive a cumulative grade point average of 3.3 or higher for all S.T.L. work.

Residency

The residency requirement for the S.T.L. degree is four semesters in full-time enrollment or the equivalent.

Doctor of Sacred Theology, S.T.D.

The Doctor of Sacred Theology, S.T.D. is an academic degree conferred only after a candidate with a basic, tested theological orientation and proven competence in one area of specialization has shown ability for achievement in scholarly research and publication.

Degree Requirements

Admission

Applicants for the S.T.D. program are requested to submit their applications for admission, along with their letters of intent, prior to Feb. 1. Applications received after that date will be considered; however, such applications will have passed the deadline for most university-level scholarships.

The following prerequisites will be evaluated by the Committee on Admissions:

1. Possession of the S.T.L. degree from The Catholic University of America or from another ecclesiastical faculty or university or a graduate degree in theology that demonstrates equivalency to the S.T.L. requirements. (Additional seminars may be required for the doctoral program to provide the faculty the opportunity to be of greater assistance to a candidate who has been educated elsewhere.) Students whose preparation (S.T.L. or equivalent) is in an area of concentration differing from that proposed for the S.T.D. will be required to take additional courses and/or pass the licentiate comprehensive examination (3.0) in their new academic area of study.

2. A cumulative grade point average of 3.3 or better in S.T.L. work or that which has been accepted as its equivalent.

3. A letter of intent stating the proposed area of concentration, previous preparation in that area, and anticipated achievements.

4. The results of the Graduate Record Examination, GRE, or Miller Analogies Test, MAT. However, GRE scores (and not the MAT) are necessary for applicants to be considered for most university scholarships.

5. Non-native English-speakers should demonstrate evidence of English proficiency through submission of Test of English as a Foreign Language, TOEFL, scores or or through some comparable means.

6. At least three academic letters of recommendation.

7. Demonstrated proficiency in Latin and biblical Greek.

In addition, the student should have a reading proficiency in either French or German.

Coursework

Twelve semester hours of credits selected from the doctoral seminars relevant to the student's area of concentration/proposed research topic. Normally, these will be 800-level courses in the student's academic area. Any course taken to fulfill this requirement must require (or make provision for) a substantial research paper (ca. 25-30 pages).

Course Load

No more than six credit hours of coursework in the academic area plus dissertation guidance may be taken during any one of the four semesters of work in the S.T.D. program, for a total of nine semester hours per semester.

Grade Point Average

The student must maintain at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average.

Language Requirements

Demonstrated proficiency in Latin, Biblical Greek, and one modern language are prerequisites. Any student entering the S.T.D. program without them must satisfy these requirements by the end of the first fall semester in the program. Reading proficiency in a second modern language, i.e., French or German, must be demonstrated through successful completion of the school's modern language requirements (in both general and theological usage). This is ordinarily done during the first semester of matriculation. It is expected that all language requirements be satisfied by the end of the semester in which the student's dissertation proposal is submitted to the faculty for approval. Exceptions to this rule can be made only with the approval of the associate dean for graduate studies.

Candidacy

To be eligible for admission to candidacy for the S.T.D. degree, the student must (a) satisfy the language requirements and (b) complete at least six credit hours of coursework. Students should make the request for candidacy in writing to the associate dean for graduate studies.

Dissertation Guidance

Four successive semesters of dissertation guidance over and above the 12 credit hours of doctoral seminars are required. The candidate may choose (or, if circumstances require, will be assigned) a faculty adviser upon entering the program. The faculty adviser chosen or assigned may be changed with the approval of the academic area director.

Lectio

Prior to defense of the doctoral dissertation, the student must pass a comprehensive oral examination (lectio) based on the origins, history and contemporary status of the entire major area suggested by the topic of the dissertation.

Dissertation

Each candidate must prepare and successfully defend a dissertation written under the guidance of a director. The dissertation is expected to demonstrate technical mastery of the subject and the ability to engage in scholarly research and to formulate conclusions significant to the academic theological community.

Residency

The residency requirement for the S.T.D. is four semesters in full-time enrollment. Students who have completed the S.T.L. at The Catholic University of America or in an institution with requirements judged equivalent by the Admissions Committee require only two semesters of residence, followed by such extended residence as is needed during the preparation of the dissertation.

Civil Degrees—M.A. and Ph.D. Programs

Nature and Goals

The following description of the nature and requirements of the M.A. and Ph.D. programs in the School of Theology and Religious Studies provides a general description of these degree programs across the school. This general description is rendered more specific in subsequent pages, where the process to be followed to complete the M.A. and Ph.D. programs within each academic area is provided in detail.

M.A. Degree

 

Requirements

The M.A. program introduces the student to scholarship and research in a selected area of theology and religious studies. The goal of the program is to help the student develop critical literacy in the chosen area. The M.A. program promotes a broad and solid grounding in the various academic areas while also allowing for a measure of concentration according to personal preference. The degree program provides a thorough and rigorous foundationin for further graduate studies and appropriate theological training for ministerial preparation.

Academic Areas of Specialization

The School of Theology and Religious Studies offers the M.A. degree in Biblical studies, church history, historical and systematic theology, liturgical studies/sacramental theology, moral theology/ethics, religion and culture, religious education/catechetics, and spirituality.

Admission Requirements

1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university.

2. Superior achievement and the ability to pursue graduate work as indicated by official transcripts from previous institutions of study.

3. The results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test (MAT). However, GRE scores (rather than MAT) are necessary for applicants to be considered for most university scholarships and are strongly preferred.

4. Non-native English speakers must demonstrate evidence of English proficiency through submission of Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores or through some other means. Contact the university Office of Graduate Admissions for questions about eligibility for waiver of the TOEFL.

5. At least three academic letters of recommendation.

Coursework

The M.A. program requires 30 credit hours of coursework, including either a thesis (six credit hours) or two major research papers. All master's-level students must take the Pro-seminars for Master's Students in their first year of study.

Language Requirement

M.A. students must demonstrate proficiency in a foreign language, ordinarily in French, German or Spanish, by passing a specially designed exam offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures or by the school. Further language requirements may be specified as appropriate to a particular area of study.

Comprehensive Examination

The M.A. comprehensive examination is written on two successive days. It is normally taken in the last semester of coursework, on the dates specified in the academic calendar. In most areas of study a reading list is provided to assist the student's preparation.

Grade Point Average

Students must maintain an average of 3.0. A 3.3 average is required in order to apply for a Ph.D. course of study.

Thesis Option

M.A. students who choose to write a thesis may register for two semesters of M.A. Thesis Guidance. The thesis itself should demonstrate the student's ability to do research by means of a modest contribution to knowledge involving a limited but significant topic of investigation.

Specifically, the thesis should demonstrate the student's familiarity with basic methods of research; mastery of the limited subject matter; ability to exercise sound judgments involving analysis, comparison and/or criticism; and to draw appropriate and accurate conclusions. The length of the thesis is primarily governed by the nature of the subject matter and the research involved but ordinarily should be 75-100 pages. The student, with the help of a faculty member who serves as director, will prepare a one-page thesis proposal that presents the background, purpose, method, and contribution of the thesis. The proposal with a selected bibliography will be submitted to the director of the academic area for approval.

Research Papers Option

M.A. students writing two research papers are reminded that one paper must show familiarity with pertinent works in either an ancient or modern foreign language, as specified by the requirements for the M.A. degree presented in these Announcements.

Residency

The M.A. program requires at least one year of residency.

Ph.D. Degree

 

 Admission Requirements

1. A master's degree from an accredited university or seminary.

2. Superior achievement and the ability to pursue graduate work, as indicated by official transcripts from previous institutions of study.

3. The results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test (MAT). However, GRE scores (rather than the MAT) are necessary for applicants to be considered for most university scholarships and are strongly preferred.

4. Non-native English speakers must demonstrate evidence of English proficiency through submission of Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores or through some other means. Contact the university Office of Graduate Admissions for questions about eligibility for waiver of the TOEFL.

5. At least three academic letters of recommendation.

Prerequisites

Applicants should possess an M.A. or other master's-level degree (e.g., M.Div.) in theology or religious studies as offered by this faculty. Applicants who are in the process of completing an M.A. may be admitted to the program conditionally if they have maintained a minimum GPA of 3.3. The condition will be lifted when the School receives confirmation of their graduation from their master's program with an adequate GPA.

Residency

Students in the Ph.D. program should be enrolled on a full-time basis, as defined by the University, while completing their coursework. Students who have completed their minimum period of residency must continue in extended residence until all the requirements for the degree are fulfilled. Extended residence requires registration for comprehensives (1 credit hour), or for dissertation guidance (1 credit hour), unless a student is granted a leave of absence. If a student fails to register for enough courses to be considered full-time, he or she becomes ineligible for School funded scholarships.

Coursework

At least thirty hours of coursework are required after the M.A. degree. Additional requirements may be specified by individual academic areas.

Grade Point Average

Ph.D. students must maintain a 3.3 grade point average to remain in good standing. Recipients of School schoarships must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.4. Students who fall below the minimum GPA will be put on academic probation for one semester, and dismissed if they fail to meet the minimum.

Language Requirement

The language requirements for Ph.D. students are set out under the degree program descriptions of the individual academic areas.

Comprehensive Examination

Ph.D. students will be required to complete written comprehensives within the various academic areas given over the course of three days in at least three distinct areas of study. Each academic area director, in collaboration with appropriate faculty and the dean, will determine the modality of comprehensive exams.

The purpose of the comprehensive examination is not simply to examine students about knowledge already acquired within coursework, but also to provide students with the opportunity to study areas not touched upon by coursework, to deepen knowledge of areas already studied, and to synthesize and interrelate areas of theological knowledge.

Admission to Candidacy

Admission to the Ph.D. program does not imply admission to candidacy for the degree. To be admitted to candidacy, the student must have done the following:

1. Fulfilled the language requirements;

2. Completed the coursework;

3. Completed minor requirements, where required;

4. Passed the examination in the major concentration area; and

5. Been recommended by the director of the specified academic area.

Dissertation Proposal Guidelines

1. Director and Committee. The selection of a doctoral dissertation director is the student's responsibility. Ordinarily, the director will be a full-time faculty member in the School of Theology and Religious Studies. The student, dissertation director, and director of the academic area will cooperate in identifying two other faculty members to serve as readers. No more than one reader may come from outside the STRS, unless the dean of the School approves an exception. On rare occasions, and with the dean's permission, two faculty may serve as co-directors.

2. Preparation of the Proposal. After careful work among the candidate, the director, and two readers, an initial proposal should be submitted to the director of the academic area as appropriate. This group, or a representative group established by the academic area director, will meet with the student to refine the proposal further. When this group is satisfied, the proposal will then be forwarded to members of the academic area, who have two days in which to register their assessments. Once the proposal has been approved by the academic area, it is forwarded to the Ph.D. Committee for review.

3. Presentation of the proposal to the Ph.D. Committee. One hard copy and one electronic copy of the proposal are to be sent to the Ph.D. Committee chair. The hard copy is to include the Doctoral Dissertation and Topic Committee: Request for Approval form, with all relevant signatures. (An electronic copy of this form is available from the Office of the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies.) The Ph.D. Committee will then review the proposal. If the proposal is acceptable to the Ph.D. Committee as presented, the candidate and director will be so informed in writing. If the proposal is unacceptable to the Ph.D. Committee as presented, the candidate and director will be so informed in writing. Once revised, the proposal must be resubmitted for approval by the Ph.D. Committee. The Ph.D. Committee will normally meet once per month during the academic year. The proposal should be delivered to the committee chair at least one week prior to the meeting.

4. Dissertation Proposal Format. The dissertation proposal is to follow the format as directed by the Dean of Graduate Studies Office on the back of the Doctoral Dissertation Topic and Committee: Request for Approval form. The Select Bibliography should be no more than two to three pages in length. When forwarding the proposal to the Ph.D. Committee, the following information must also be included: e-mail address of the director and student and the current mailing address for the student.

5. Completion of the Dissertation Approval Process. Upon approval by the Ph.D. Committee and formal notification of the student and director, the dissertation proposal will be forwarded to the dean of the School of Theology and Religious Studies. Upon approval by the dean, the proposal is forwarded to the Office of the Vice-Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies office for external review and approval. Once this is completed, the student will receive a letter from that office informing him or her that the proposal has been approved and specifying the due date for the finished dissertation.

6. Dissertation Defense. Once the dissertation is completed and the director and readers give their approval, the School will organize an oral defense in accordance with university regulations.

Administrative Details

Administrative details regarding proposal, approval, dissertation publication, printing, and graduation and commencement are available from the assistant to the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies.

Academic Areas of Study

Biblical Studies

 

Professors Rev. Christopher Begg; Rev. Francis T. Gignac, S.J. Director; Rev. John Paul Heil; Rev. Joseph Jensen, O.S.B.; Rev. Frank J. Matera
Associate Professor Robert D. Miller
Assistant Professors David A. Bosworth, Hellen Mardaga
Professor Emeriti Rev. Alexander A. Di Lella, O.F.M.; Rev. Joseph A. Fitzmyer, S.J.; Rev. Francis J. Moloney, S.D.B.

Goals of the Academic Area

 The program is designed to provide men and women with the training necessary for effective teaching, research, and publication in the biblical field. The main emphasis is placed on control of biblical languages and exegesis.

Degrees Offered

The program offers the M.A. and Ph.D. in biblical studies and the S.T.L. and S.T.D. in biblical theology.

Prerequisites for the M.A., Ph.D.

Since a theological component is considered essential for training in exegesis, which is itself a theological endeavor, students who are admitted with only an undergraduate concentration in religious studies or its equivalent will be required to take for credit a minimum of three graduate courses in theology. Students without an undergraduate degree in theology or religious studies will be required to take graduate courses in theology as determined by the area director.

Biblical Languages for the M.A. , Ph.D.

The student must achieve sufficient control of the languages of the Bible for independent research. All students must demonstrate competence in Greek, Hebrew, and at least one other Semitic language. Mastery of these languages should be the primary goal of the student at the M.A. level of the program.  New Testament specialists will be expected to have further training in Greek and may wish to study Coptic or take additional courses in Aramaic or Syriac. Old Testament specialists will be expected to have further training in Hebrew and Syriac and may wish to study Arabic, Ugaritic, or Akkadian. The Semitic languages are offered by the Department of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures in the School of Arts and Sciences in conjunction with the biblical studies academic area. Biblical Greek is offered by the biblical studies academic area.

Master of Arts Degree in Biblical Studies

To earn the M.A. degree the student must fulfill the following requirements:

  • A reading knowledge of French or German.
  • A minimum of 30 semester hours of credit beyond the bachelor's degree.
  • A satisfactory understanding of theology.
  • A written comprehensive examination at the conclusion of the coursework.
  • An M.A. thesis or, with the approval of the academic area director, two seminar papers.

Course Work

  • Biblical Greek (at least three courses beyond the elementary level).
  • Biblical Hebrew (at least three courses beyond the elementary level).
  • Exegesis (one Old Testament course, one New Testament course).
  • Related area (at least one course).
  • Thesis guidance.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree in Biblical Studies

To earn the Ph.D. the student must fulfill the following requirements:

  • An M.A. in a related discipline.
  • A reading knowledge of both French and German.
  • A minimum of 30 semester hours of credit beyond the M.A. degree.
  • A satisfactory level of attainment in theological understanding and methodology.
  • A written comprehensive examination at the conclusion of the coursework.
  • A doctoral dissertation.

Course Work

  • Exegesis (five courses).
  • A second Semitic language (at least two courses).
  • Theology and related areas (at least three courses).
  • Dissertation guidance.

Semester hours of credit must total at least 30 hours for the M.A. degree, with a minimum of 30 additional hours for the Ph.D. degree. In view of the diversity of backgrounds of beginning students, courses at the two levels may be adjusted to meet individual needs.

S.T.L. and S.T.D. in Biblical Theology

In addition to its M.A.-Ph.D. program, the biblical studies area offers the licentiate (S.T.L.) and the doctorate (S.T.D.) in biblical theology. These degrees, which are accredited by the Holy See, are especially appropriate for clerics and those who intend to teach in ecclesiastical faculties.

The S.T.L. in Biblical Theology

Prerequisites for the S.T.L. in Biblical Theology

To be admitted to the S.T.L. program a student must have already earned an S.T.B. in theology or its equivalent, e.g., an M.Div. The CUA S.T.B. requires 69 credits in academic theology, a comprehensive examination, and a reading knowledge of Latin.

Program of Study for the S.T.L. in Biblical Theology

  • 24 credits in exegesis at the licentiate (700) or doctoral (800) level.
  • Thesis guidance (for at least three successive semesters).
  • S.T.L. thesis.
  • A comprehensive examination based on a booklist available on the website of the School of Theology and Religious Studies.

Language Requirements for the S.T.L. in Biblical Theology

· Greek: 6 credits beyond introductory Greek (the introductory course requires 6 credits).

· Hebrew: 6 credits beyond introductory Hebrew (the introductory course requires 6 credits).

· Latin.

· French or German.

 

The S.T.D. in Biblical Theology

Prerequisites for the S.T.D. in Biblical Theology

To be admitted to the S.T.D. in biblical theology, a student must have an S.T.L. in biblical theology or an S.S.L. from the Biblical Institute (Rome) or the Pontifical Biblical Commission.

Program of Study for the S.T.D. in Biblical Theology

  • Twelve credits in exegesis at the doctoral (800) level.
  • Dissertation guidance for at least four successive semesters.
  • Lectio on a topic related to the student's dissertation topic.
  • S.T.D. dissertation and defense.

Language Requirements for the S.T.D. in Biblical Theology

In addition to the language requirements listed above for the S.T.L., S.T.D. students must have a reading knowledge of both German and French.

Church History

Professors William Dinges; Rev. Jacques Gres-Gayer, Nelson Minnich

Associate Professor

Tarmo Toom; Joseph White; Susan Wessel, Director

Professor Emeritus

Msgr. Robert Trisco

 

The program offers the M.A. and Ph.D in Church History

 

Master of Arts in Church History

 

The goal of the M.A. in Church History is to prepare students for careers in religious education and for advanced study on the doctoral level.Students in the M.A. program are expected to think critically about the ways in which the Church has been studied over the centuries.In order to do this effectively, students are expected to acquire training in the original languages and to conduct their research in the primary texts.The program allows for students to complete coursework in related fields and disciplines.

 

Prerequisites

Students should have earned a Bachelor of Arts degree and completed coursework in religious studies, theology, and history.Additional preparation in these areas may be undertaken during the course of study.

 

Degree Requirements for the M.A. in Church History

 

Course Requirements:

1. A minimum of thirty credit hours

2. Ancient and Medieval Church History (TRS 628)

From Avignon to Vatican II (TRS 621C)

The Writing of Church History (TRS 620A)

3. Two seminars in which research papers are required and for which at least a grade of B is received.At least one of these seminars must be in the Church History area.

 

Language Requirements

  1. Reading knowledge of French or German, to be determined by passing an examination administered by the Church History area, or by receiving a grade of B or better in Theological German (TRS 501).
  2. Competency in one additional language may be required depending upon the student’s area of concentration (e.g. Greek or Latin for early and Medieval church history), to be determined either by passing an examination administered by the Department of Greek and Latin, or by receiving a grade of B or better in an approved language course in the Department of Greek and Latin.

 

Comprehensive Examinations

1. Two general examinations and one major examination in the area of concentration

2. Two of the core Church History courses listed above, TRS 628 and TRS 621C, may be taken to fulfill the requirements for the general examinations.

3. The major examination in the area of concentration will be prepared under the direction of the student’s adviser.

 

 

Doctor of Philosophy in Church History

 

The goal of the Ph.D. in Church History is to prepare students for careers in research, writing, and teaching on the college, university, and seminary levels. Students in the Ph.D. program are expected to think critically about the ways in which the Church has been studied over the centuries and to apply those insights to the study of their area of concentration.In order to do this effectively, students are expected to acquire advanced training in the original languages and to conduct their research in the primary texts.The program allows for students to complete coursework and to acquire competency in fields and disciplines relevant to their area of concentration.

 

Prerequisites

It is expected that applicants to the program will have taken courses in the History of the Church, Theology, Religious Studies, and in such related disciplines as History.

Students entering with an M.A. degree will be considered for direct admission to the doctoral  program.Relevant bodies within the school may review the quality of a student’s M.A. degree before granting admission to a student.After such an evaluation, the student may be required to complete further work, including work in related disciplines.

 

Degree requirements for the Ph.D in Church History

 

Course Requirements

1. A minimum of thirty-six credit hours beyond the M.A., including fifteen credit hours in Church History, twelve credit hours of which will be from courses taken on the 700 and 800 levels.

2. The Writing of Church History (TRS 620A).

3. Four research seminars in which a research paper is required, and in two of which the student will have received at least a grade of A-.

 

Language Requirements

1. Reading knowledge of French and German, to be determined by passing an examination administered by the Church History area.

2. Competency in Ecclesiastical Latin, to be determined by passing an examination administered either by the Church History area or by the department of Greek and Latin.

3. Competency in additional languages that may be needed for research in the area of concentration (e.g., Patristic Latin, Greek, and/or Syriac), to be determined by passing an examination administered either by the department of Greek and Latin or by the Church History area, at the discretion of the Church History faculty.

 

Comprehensive Examinations

Church History students are required to pass four written comprehensive examinations.Two (four-hour) examinations will be in the area of concentration and two (four-hour) examinations will be in minor fields, one of which may be in another discipline (e.g., History, Philosophy, Greek and Latin, Semitics).

 

Before the student advances to Doctoral Candidacy, the student’s file will be evaluated by the student’s adviser and by the Church History area faculty.

Historical and Systematic Theology

 

Professors Rev. Regis Armstrong, O.F.M.; William Dinges; Rev. John Ford, C.S.C.,; Rev. John Galvin, Director; Msgr. Kevin Irwin; Msgr. Paul McPartlan; Nelson Minnich; Rev. James Wiseman, O.S.B.
Associate Professors John Grabowski; William Loewe,  Christopher Ruddy; Tarmo Toom; Susan Wessel
Assistant Professors Joshua Benson; Rev. Mark Morozowich; Chad C. Pecknold; Rev. Nicholas Lombardo, O.P.
Professors Emeriti Rev. David Power, O.M.I.. Patrick Granfield, O.S
Adjunct Associate Professor Chorbishop Seely Beggiani

 Goals of the Academic Area: Historical Theology

The Program in Historical Theology studies the development of Eastern and Western Christian theology from the earliest Christian communities to the present.

Through the emergence of theology as a science in the 12th-century West, the discipline of theology became systematized and eventually located in the setting of a university. Before, during and after this development, however, the practice of theology included liturgical forms, preaching, treatises on the contemplative life and pastoral care, communal devotions and diverse exegetical strategies. Throughout this history and increasingly in the modern West, the interplay between faith and reason and between philosophy and theology have remained central preoccupations.

Current strengths of the program include Greek, Latin and Syriac patristics, medieval systematic and mystical theology, the Franciscan tradition, John Henry Newman, Vatican I/Vatican II, 20th-century Catholic thought, John Courtney Murray, the history of the ecumenical movement, Latino Catholicism, and recent developments in European and U.S. Catholic theology. The Program in Historical Theology works closely with the other academic areas in the School of Theology and Religious Studies (biblical studies, church history, liturgical studies, moral theology, pastoral theology) as well as with the School of Philosophy, the Department of History, the Department of Greek and Latin, the Department of Semitics, the Center for Early Christian Studies and the Center for Medieval and Byzantine Studies.

Goals of the Academic Area: Systematic Theology

Systematic theology undertakes the task of a comprehensive and synthetic understanding of the Christian faith as mediated through the Scriptures and the Catholic tradition and as interpreted by the conciliar and papal magisterium. Building on courses that explore the history of this effort, the program reflects on questions of hermeneutics and method, especially about the relationship among theology, philosophy, history and the modern sciences. Courses are developed with a recognition of the ecumenical, cross-cultural and interreligious aspects of questions. The program focuses in particular on theological questions about anthropology, revelation and faith, dogma and the development of doctrines, christology and soteriology, Trinity, ecclesiology, eschatology, comparative theology, and theology of religions.

Degrees Offered

The academic area offers the civil degrees of M.A. and Ph.D. and ecclesiastical degrees of S.T.L. and S.T.D.

Master of Arts Degree

Nature and Goals

 The MA program in Historical/Systematic Theology is designed to introduce students to scholarship and research in theology and religious studies in general and to historical/systematic theology in particular. This program provides a basic grounding in historical/systematic theology, along with an introduction to biblical studies, moral theology, and other disciplines.

Prerequisites:
Applicants for admission to the MA program must possess a bachelor's degree with a minimum of 12 credit-hours in theology/religious studies and 12 credit-hours in philosophy. Applicants who do not have this background will be required to complete appropriate courses in tandem with their MA work. Prerequisites will be specified in a student’s letter of admission.

Degree Requirements (Summary):

1. Proseminars for MA students in their first year of study.
2. Thirty credit hours in addition to prerequisites
3. Either a thesis (6 credit hours) or two major research papers.
4. Demonstration of language proficiency.
5. A grade point average of 3.0
6. Successful completion of a comprehensive exam

Degree Requirements (Details):

Proseminars:
MA students are expected to attend three workshops in the fall semester: two on research methodology and one on academic style; students must verify their attendance by signing in at the workshops.

Thirty Credit hours:
MA students are expected to fulfill the following course requirements:
Introductory Level: (3 credit hours):
TRS 660 History and Method of Theology (required)
Systematic Theology (9 hours): chosen from offerings at the 600-level
Historical Theology/Church History (3 hours) from offerings at 600-level
Moral (3 hours): chosen from offerings at the 600-level
Scripture (3 hours): chosen from offerings at the 600-level
Electives: (9 hours for students writing research papers; 3 hours for students writing an MA thesis).

Thesis Option:
MA students who choose to write a thesis must register for two semesters of MA Thesis Guidance (TRS 995 Thesis-Masters).

An MA thesis should demonstrate a student’s ability to do research by means of a modest contribution to knowledge involving a limited but significant topic of investigation. Specifically, an MA thesis should demonstrate: a student's familiarity with basic methods of research; mastery of a limited subject matter; ability to exercise sound theological judgments involving analysis, comparison, and criticism; appropriate and accurate conclusions.

The length of the thesis is primarily governed by the nature of the subject matter and the research involved but ordinarily should be 75-100 pages (in 12-point Times New Roman with standard margins).

Readers: A student, with the help of a faculty member who serves as director, will prepare a one-page thesis proposal that presents the background, purpose, method, and contribution of the proposed thesis. The proposal with a selected bibliography is be submitted to the Area Director for preliminary approval and then to the MA Committee for final approval.

Research Papers Option:
1. MA research papers may be: [i] written independently of any course or
[ii] written in conjunction with a particular course and/or in fulfillment of course requirements; in the latter case, students, at the beginning of the semester, must inform the professor of their intention of satisfying MA requirements by writing an MA research paper.
2. On the cover of the paper, the professor is to comment briefly about its quality and indicate whether a student has used a foreign language, then grade and sign the paper, and give it to the Area Director for placement in the student's file; a student must receive a minimum grade of B (3.0) on each of the research papers.
3. The length of each research paper should be a minimum of 6000 words but a maximum of 7500 words. One of the two research papers must show familiarity with pertinent works in Latin, or Greek, or a modern foreign language.

Language Proficiency:
MA students must demonstrate a basic knowledge of either Latin or Greek by: (1) passing either TRS 500A “Theological Latin” or TRS 502 “Greek for Theology” or by (2) passing a reading exam in either Latin or Biblical Greek. [MA students must also demonstrate theological reading knowledge of either German or a Romance language by passing an area exam in the language. Instead of passing an exam, the German requirement may also be fulfilled by passing TRS 504 Theological German.

Comprehensive Examinations:
MA comprehensive examinations, which are ordinarily taken in the final semester of a student’s MA program, are based on a reading list (available as a separate handout). The purpose of the MA comprehensive examination is to assist the candidate to synthesize and integrate her/his theological knowledge.
[6.2]The examination will be graded on a pass-fail basis and will be considered as a unit. The examination may be repeated once in the case of failure.
[6.4]The primary purpose of this examination is to aid a student achieve a broad and solid grounding in the Roman Catholic tradition. The examination will be based on a reading list of approximately thirty books; but the examination is not to be conceived simply as a search for descriptive information from these selected texts. Rather, the topics in these books are meant to serve as the basis for a student's synthesizing and integrating process, which ought to bring together the student's wider knowledge gained from classes, readings, lectures and discussions.

  

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

Nature and Goals

The degree "Doctor of Philosophy" (Ph.D.) in historical/systematic theology represents an achievement in theological scholarship and research. The Ph.D. program is designed to prepare graduate students to make significant contributions to knowledge in a major area of historical or systematic inquiry while broadening their understanding of other areas of theology. By means of research seminars, advanced level courses, language skills, comprehensive examinations, and an extensive research project, the program is designed to develop graduates who are capable of thorough theological understanding and careful research. The area offers two Ph.D. tracks, one in Systematic Theology and one in Historical Theology.
 
Prerequisites for Admission
 
1. At least twelve credit hours of undergraduate or graduate philosophy. Normally, these credits should be in four of the following areas: ancient philosophy, medieval philosophy, modern philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, ethics.
2. At least fifteen credit hours of undergraduate and/or graduate courses in theology of religious studies at a B grade level or above. These should include courses in the Old and New Testaments, church history, and systematic and moral theology. Upon review of an applicant's previous studies, some prerequisite courses may be required at the discretion of the admissions committee.
3. A completed Master's degree or its equivalent.
 
Course Requirements
 
The Ph.D. degree requires:
1. A minimum of thirty-six hours of course work after the M.A. degree:
1. Eighteen hours (including TRS 760A: Theological Foundations) are to be taken in the student's area of concentration (historical or systematic theology) in courses at the 700-level (lecture) and 800-level (seminars). At least twelve of these eighteen hours are to be taken in 800-level seminars which require major research papers.
2. Twelve hours of electives that may be taken in any of the academic areas of the School of Theology and Religious Studies.
3. Six hours in a minor area outside the major area of concentration (see below). With the approval of the academic area director, these courses may be taken in other graduate schools of the University.
4. Students who enter the Ph.D. program with an inadequate background are encouraged to audit 600 level courses in order to complement their courses at the 700- and 800-level.
 
Language Requirements
 
Candidates for the Ph.D. must demonstrate a reading knowledge of the following languages: [1] Latin, [2] Greek, [3] German, and [4] a major Romance language.
[1] Reading knowledge of Latin must be demonstrated by successful completion of the Latin Proficiency Exam administered by the Historical/Systematic area or by a course in Patristic or Medieval Latin. Ordinarily, the Latin requirement should be satisfied during a student's first fall semester in the program.
[2] Reading knowledge of either biblical or patristic Greek must be demonstrated either by the successful completion of a reading course in biblical or patristic Greek (depending upon the student's area of concentration) or by an examination administered by the Historical/Systematic area.
[3] Reading knowledge of theological German must be demonstrated either by passing an examination administered by the Historical/Systematic area or by passing TRS 504 "Theological German."
[4] Reading knowledge of a modern Romance language must be demonstrated by passing an examination administered by the Historical/Systematic area.
 
 
Minor Area
 
Ph.D. students, in consultation with their faculty advisors, are to choose a minor area of concentration outside the major area of concentration. While students are not expected to have the depth or extent of knowledge in the minor area which is expected in the principal area of concentration, they are expected to know how this other area relates and contributes to the principal area of concentration, in particular, to the more specialized field within a student's principal area of concentration.
 
Appropriate minor areas of concentration include systematic theology, moral theology, historical theology, biblical theology, spiritual theology, liturgical theology, comparative theology, canon law, church history, religious education/catechetics, and religion and culture. A student may choose another area for a minor with the approval of the area director. Students in historical theology should ordinarily take church history as the minor area of concentration. A minor area must be fulfilled by six hours of course work.
 
 
Comprehensive Examinations
 
A comprehensive examination is required for the Ph.D. degree. This examination is intended to demonstrate a student's knowledge in the principal area of concentration (historical or systematic)-in particular, the area within that concentration in which a student intends to write a dissertation. The examination will take place on three days according to the examination period specified by the University calendar.
 
The purpose of the comprehensive examination is not simply to examine students about knowledge acquired through course work, but also to provide an opportunity to study areas not treated in their courses, as well as to deepen knowledge of areas already studied, and to synthesize and interrelate areas of theological knowledge. The time for comprehensives should be seen as a time for independent study in collaboration and consultation with faculty members.  The comprehensive examination may be taken only after any provisional elements attached to the student's status have been regularized and after all language requirements for the degree have been satisfied.
 
If a student fails a comprehensive examination, it may be repeated only once. However, the retake should be scheduled for the following semester at the earliest, and may not occur during the semester in which the failure occurred. A second failure in the same examination automatically terminates a student's enrollment in the Ph.D. program.
 
Doctoral Dissertation
The student writes and defends a written doctoral dissertation in accordance with University Policies.
 
 
Licentiate in Sacred Theology (STL)
 
Admission

Admission to the STL program presupposes the possession of the STB degree from a pontifical faculty or its academic equivalent as determined by the Ecclesiastical Degrees Committee (EDC). For admission to the STL program, applicants must submit a university application (available on line), post-secondary transcripts, three letters of recommendation and either GRE or MAT scores; in the case of international students, TOEFL scores are required.

STRS students who are entering their seventh semester of theological studies in the STB program and have obtained permission to delay their STB comprehensives until the scheduled dates during that semester may apply for provisional admission to the STL program provided they have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.00 or higher. This provision will be lifted once the student has successfully completed all STB requirements.

Requirements

Residency
The residency requirement for the STL is four semesters (full time).
 

Concentration
Students admitted to the STL program must indicate, at the time of initial registration, their major field of concentration (Systematic Theology, Moral Theology, Biblical Theology, Historical Theology, Sacramental Theology, or Liturgical Studies). At the time of initial registration, each student will be assigned a faculty advisor for assistance in course selection as well as in the initial consideration of a thesis topic and director.

Course Requirements
Students must complete a minimum of 24 credits of course work, plus 6 credits for the thesis; thesis credits will be awarded after the thesis has been approved.
During their first year, STL students are required to participate in the four proseminars that are offered for licentiate and doctoral students. The directives for research guidance on the doctoral level also apply on the licentiate level; in particular, STL students are required to maintain continuous registration until all their requirements are completed, unless they have received an approved leave of absence.
Each student must take and successfully complete at least 24 semester hours of course work on either the 700 or 800 level. These required credits must be taken in the student's chosen field of concentration.
Ordinarily courses will be chosen from the course offerings of the School of Theology and Religious Studies. Students may take advantage of the extensive offerings of the university in subjects useful for their theological studies, by taking up to six semester hours in another school or department; such courses must be related to the student's area of concentration. In each instance, the written approvals of both the area director and the dean or the department head of the other school or department are required.
In addition to the minimum 24 credit hours of course work, each student must prepare and obtain final approval for a written thesis on a research project. Students must register for research guidance (993) for each of three successive semesters, beginning with the second semester of enrollment in the STL program. The purpose of the non-credit research guidance is to guide the student in readings pertinent to the chosen area of concentration, help the student prepare a thesis proposal, and direct the student in the writing of the thesis.

Language Requirements
Candidates for the STL degree in theology must fulfill the following language requirements by the end of the semester before the candidate takes the comprehensive examination.
a. Latin: Successful completion of a Latin Proficiency Examination, administered by the Historical/Systematic area. The Latin requirement should ordinarily be satisfied by the end of the first fall semester in the program.
b. Greek: Successful completion of a reading course in either biblical or patristic Greek or passing an examination in either biblical or patristic Greek, depending on a student’s area of concentration.
c. Modern Language: [1] A reading ability in either German or a romance language (French, Italian, Spanish) must be demonstrated by successful completion of the university modern language examination or of an intensive language course ("Reading for Comprehension" # 500). [2] In addition, a student must demonstrate a knowledge of theological usage of the same modern language by a satisfactory translation of a theological passage in a test administered by the area. The requirement in theological usage in German may also be fulfilled by passing TRS 504 "Theological German.
Another modern foreign language may be substituted for German or a romance language if needed for the student's research with the approval of the student’s thesis director and reader and with the approval of the area director

Admission to Candidacy:
An STL student may apply for admission to candidacy when the following requirements have been successfully completed:
[1] all language requirements;
[2] all required course work, including the proseminars.
The application for candidacy should be submitted to the area director, who, after consultation with the area faculty, forwards a recommendation to the Associate Dean for Graduate Studies.

Thesis
Each candidate for the STL degree must write a thesis of approximately 25,000-35,000 words, which demonstrates the ability to proceed further in theological research. The thesis should give evidence of training in research and make a contribution to theological knowledge involving a limited, yet significant, problem of investigation. The thesis must show the candidate's familiarity with basic methods and techniques of research, technical mastery of a specific but limited subject matter, and ability to exercise sound theological judgment and formulate accurate conclusions.

Doctorate in Sacred Theology (STD)

Admission

The following prerequisites will be evaluated by the Admissions Committee:
1. Possession of the STL degree from the School of Theology and Religious Studies (CUA) or from another ecclesiastical faculty; in the case of an STL earned elsewhere, additional seminars may be required so that a student’s preparation will be equivalent to the STL at Catholic University. Students whose preparation (STL or its equivalent) is in an area of concentration other than Historical or Systematic Theology will be required to take additional courses and/or pass the licentiate comprehensive examination (with a minimum grade of 3.0)) in the area of historical and systematic theology
2. A cumulative grade point average of at least 3.3 for the STL or its equivalent.
3. A letter of intent stating the proposed area of concentration, previous preparation in that area, and anticipated achievements.
4. Submission of Graduate Record Examination scores or Miller Analogies Test score; in the case of students whose first language is not English, the results of TOEFL must also be submitted.
5. Three letters of recommendation sent to the admissions office by persons who are in a position to judge the applicant's ability for doctoral studies in historical and systematic theology.

Residency
The residency requirement for the STD is four full time semesters, unless the student has completed the STL at The Catholic University of America (CUA); in this case, only two semesters of residence are required, followed by continual registration during the preparation of the dissertation.

Course Requirements
During their first year, all students are required to attend the four proseminars that are offered for licentiate and doctoral students; students who fulfilled this requirement in the STL program are not required to repeat these proseminars.
Each STD student must complete a minimum of four doctoral seminars (12 credits) at the 800-level); all of these courses require a substantial research paper (of approximately 5000-7000 words). STD students must maintain at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average. No more than six credit hours of theology courses plus dissertation guidance may be taken during any of the four semesters in the STD program.
STD students must register for dissertation guidance (997) for each of their four semesters in the STD program. Students should choose a dissertation director, with the approval of the area chair, as early as possible in their STD program.


Language Requirements
Candidates for the STD degree must fulfill the following language requirements, unless they have already fulfilled these requirements in the STL program in STRS:
a. Latin: Successful completion of the Latin Proficiency Examination, administered by the Historical/Systematic area. The Latin requirement should ordinarily be satisfied by the end of the first fall semester in the program.
b. Greek: Successful completion of a reading course in either biblical or patristic Greek or passing an examination in either biblical or patristic Greek, depending on the student’s area of concentration.
c. Modern Language: [1] A reading ability in both German and a romance language (French, Italian, Spanish) must be demonstrated by successful completion of the university modern language examination or by an intensive language course (500: "Reading for Comprehension"). [2] In addition, a student must demonstrate knowledge of the theological usage of these modern languages by satisfactory translation of a theological passage through a test administered by the Historical/Systematic area. The requirement in theological usage in German may also be fulfilled by passing TRS 504 "Theological German.
Another modern foreign language may be substituted for German or a romance language—if the language is needed for the student's research—with the approval of the student’s dissertation director and readers and with the approval of the area director 

Dissertation

Each STD candidate must write a dissertation which demonstrates the ability to contribute to theological research. The dissertation should make a contribution to theological knowledge.The dissertation must show the candidate's familiarity with basic methods and techniques in theological research, technical mastery of a specific area, and an ability to exercise sound theological judgment and formulate accurate conclusions.

 Lectio

Before defending the dissertation, the STD candidate must pass an oral examination on the origins, history, and contemporary status of the major area of the dissertation.At least one month prior to the defense of the dissertation, the STD candidate must present a list of five topics related to, but not identical with, the topic of the dissertation to the dissertation committee, who will serve as examiners for the lectio. The dissertation director and two readers collaborate with the candidate in drafting the topics for the lectio, which are then submitted to the area director for final approval. The lectio topics are to have some demonstrable connection with the dissertation, but should not be such that would make the dissertation defense unnecessary. Thus, the lectio questions might concern methodologies other than that used in the dissertation or theories allied with that proposed in the dissertation, but not developed in it, etc.

Final Grade for the STD Degree
To be eligible for the degree, a candidate must obtain a 3.00 average in course work and in both the lectio and dissertation defense.
The final grade for the degree shall be computed as follows:
30% Course work
50% Dissertation
10% Lectio
10% Defense

Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology

Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology
Professors
Msgr. Kevin Irwin; Msgr. Paul McPartlan
Associate Professors
Sister Margaret Mary Kelleher, O.S.U.; Rev. Dominic Serra, Director; Rev. Mark Morozowich; Rev. Michael Witczak
Assistant Professors
Sister Margaret Schreiber, O.P.
Professor Emeritus
Rev. David Power, O.M.I.
Professor Emerita
Sister Mary Collins, O.S.B.
 
  
Goals of the Academic Area
The M.A. may be pursued in one of two tracks. The goal of the M.A. in liturgical studies/sacramental theology with a specialization in research is to equip students for a broad range of educational, diocesan and parish ministries. It also leads to advanced study on the doctoral level. The M.A. in liturgical studies/sacramental theology with a specialization in pastoral liturgy equips students for catechetical, diocesan and parish ministries. There is opportunity in both degrees for some interdisciplinary study in allied academic areas such as music, architecture, etc.
 
The goal of the Ph.D. in liturgical studies/sacramental theology is to equip students for careers in research, writing and teaching on the college, university and seminary levels. Coursework and dissertations for this degree often reflect an interdisciplinary approach to liturgical studies.
 
The S.T.L./S.T.D. sequence presumes a background in the basic S.T.B. theological curriculum and is a highly focused course of studies in the academic area. It equips the student for a broad range of educational and administrative ministries.
 
The D.Min. is a professional degree that combines the study of academic aspects of liturgy with pastoral implementation. It trains students for practical, pastoral ministry in the Church.
 
Degrees Offered and Areas of Concentration
The Program in Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology offers the civil degrees of M.A. with alternative concentrations in research and pastoral liturgy, the Ph.D., and the ecclesiastical degrees of S.T.L. and S.T.D. and the professional degree of D.Min.
 
Ecclesiastical Degrees
Two ecclesiastical degree concentrations are offered at the STL and STD levels. Each track accentuates one of the two inseparable aspects of this academic area, Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology.
 
Liturgical Studies
The STL/STD in Liturgical Studies focuses primarily upon the liturgical historical development of services with an accentuation upon the theological development through the centuries as the vehicle of a living theology of Christian Worship. STD seminars will be chosen with this focus in mind. The general STL descriptions apply with the following specifics:
 

STL in Liturgical Studies

1. Ancient Languages:A reading knowledge of Latin is a prerequisite and must be demonstrated during the first semester of course work. Greek reading ability is to be demonstrated by the end of the second semester.

2. Modern Language: A reading knowledge French is preferred and should be demonstrated early in the second semester.

3. Core Courses: 741A – Liturgy: Theological and Historical Perspectives, 741B – Liturgy and Culture, 740 – Liturgical Sources, and 744 – Eucharist: A Liturgical Theology.

 
Sacramental Theology
The STL/STD in Sacramental Theology focuses primarily upon the theological understanding of liturgical services in light of their historical development. This concentration attends to these matters with a focus on issues in sacramental theology as these relate to the method and content of historical/systematic theology. STD seminars will be chosen with this focus in mind. The general STL descriptions apply with the following specifics:
 
 
STL in Sacramental Theology
1. Language requirements are the same as those for the STL in Liturgical Studies.
2. Core Courses: 741A – Liturgy: Theological and Historical Perspectives, 740 – Liturgical Sources, and 744 – Eucharist: A Liturgical Theology.
 
Electives: Must include one course in Christology and one course in Ecclesiology.
 
 
Master of Arts Degree
The program consists of 30 credit hours of coursework. This includes a core curriculum of twelve credits and 18 additional credits in electives.; two research papers done in connection with courses or a thesis; and written comprehensive examinations. The thesis should be 75-100 pages in length and the two research papers should be 25-30 pages each.
 
The four core liturgical courses for the research specialization are: Liturgy: Theological and Historical Perspectives (TRS 741A), Liturgy and Culture (TRS 741B), Liturgical Sources (TRS 740), and Eucharist: A Liturgical Theology (TRS 744). Students specializing in pastoral liturgy must take Liturgical Catechesis (TRS 743A) in place of Liturgical Sources (TRS 740).
 
Students in the research specialization must demonstrate reading proficiency in both Latin and French. The Latin requirement is fulfilled by passing a reading exam for which the best preparation is LAT 509 and the French requirement is fulfilled by passing a reading exam administered within STRS for which FREN 500 is a good preparation. The pastoral liturgy specialization has no language requirements. 
 
Special Admissions Requirements
1. Students should possess a B.A. with a liberal arts emphasis, and have completed courses in ecclesiology, christology, and critical introductions to the Old and New Testament, and demonstrate a familiarity with the general areas in Liturgical Studies covered in TRS 540. A familiarity with Church History is highly desirable.
2. Students must submit Graduate Record Examination scores.
3. Students must also submit three letters of recommendation.
 
Doctoral Programs
Qualified students may develop S.T.L., and S.T.D. programs in consultation with the program director. D.Min. students may specialize in liturgical studies for their final project. Please consult specific degree program requirements (ecclesiastical and pastoral degrees) for additional information.
 
Doctor of Philosophy Degree
Admission
The minimum requirement for entrance into the Ph.D. in liturgical studies/sacramental theology is either a master's or licentiate degree in an appropriate discipline. Students entering with a licentiate will be considered for advanced standing in the program. Relevant bodies within the school may review the quality of an individual M.A. degree. After such evaluation, further work may be required for individual students, including work in related disciplines. It is expected that applicants to the program in Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology would have taken courses in a critical introduction to the Old Testament and New Testament, christology, ecclesiology, and sacramental theology and would have familiarity with church history.
 
Prerequisites
Applicants would normally be expected to have taken master's-level courses equivalent to the School of Theology and Religious Studies courses in History and Theology of Liturgy (TRS 741A), Liturgical Sources (TRS 740), and a Liturgical Theology of Eucharist (TRS 744).
 
Coursework
Ph.D. students are required to complete a minimum of 36 credit hours. Eighteen of these will be in Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology from courses taken on the 700 and 800 levels. Twelve of the 18 credits must be from 800-level doctoral seminars. three of which must be on the 800 level. Twelve credit hours will be in electives taken from courses within the School of Theology and Religious Studies on the 700 and 800 levels, e.g., biblical studies, systematics, church history, etc. The final six credits will be taken from another field within the School of Theology and Religious Studies or from another school within the university, e.g. architecture, anthropology, music, etc. in courses at a level equivalent to STRS 700 and 800 levels. During their coursework, students will be required to have produced four research papers that will become a part of the student's file to be reviewed by the Liturgical Studies/Sacramental Theology faculty prior to the student being granted doctoral candidacy. Each research paper will be at least 25-30 pages. At least three of these papers should be written in conjunction with 800-level courses and should evidence the student's proficiency in doing research using foreign languages. These papers will be evaluated by the course professor and given a letter grade. After the students have seen the graded text, the assistant to the dean for graduate studies will place the paper in the student's file.
 
Grade Point Average
Students must maintain a 3.3 grade point average.
 
Language Requirements
Students are to demonstrate reading proficiency in Latin and Greek and in two modern languages, usually German and French. The language requirements will be met by passing a reading proficiency examination administered within the School of Theology and Religious Studies or by passing certain language courses. However, depending on a student's research agenda, another modern language may substitute for one of these. Approval for such a substitution will be granted by the director of the academic area upon consultation with the liturgical studies/sacramental theology faculty.
 
Comprehensive Examination
Written comprehensive examinations will be taken over three days. Ordinarily these are taken within one week, at dates established by the School's Calendar. Two of these days will be comprehensives in the liturgical studies/sacramental theology area of concentration. The final day will be on the student's allied area of study. The material for the comprehensives will be taken from three bibliographies prepared by the students in consultation with one faculty member for each day of the comprehensives.
 
Dissertation
Upon successful completion of comprehensive exams, the student will apply to the academic area director for candidacy. The academic area faculty will evaluate the student's application for candidacy. Upon successful admittance to candidacy, each student will have his or her dissertation proposal approved. Finally, each student will complete and defend orally his or her dissertation before a dissertation examination board.
 

 

Moral Theology/Ethics

Professor Rev. Brian V. Johnstone, C.S.S.R.
Associate Professors William Barbieri; Joseph Capizzi, Director; John Grabowski
Assistant Professor William Mattison

Goals of the Academic Area

Moral theology is the branch of Christian theology that focuses on the human response to the Christian revelation. It is studied in conversation with Scripture and tradition, as well as with other disciplines such as philosophy, religious studies, politics, law, medicine and the social and behavioral sciences. This program is designed to provide men and women with advanced training in moral theology and religious ethics in order to prepare them for effective teaching, research and publication in the academy. Students may focus their research in various branches of ethics-e.g., social and political, environmental, comparative, biomedical, sexual and familial, feminist, developmental, or virtue theory. The degrees offered, however, all aim to impart an overall understanding of the Catholic moral tradition, its sources, and historical development as well as contemporary methodological expressions and debates.

Degrees Offered

The academic area offers the civil degrees of M.A. and Ph.D. and the ecclesiastical degrees of S.T.L. and S.T.D. For descriptions of the ecclesiastical degrees, please see the corresponding section listed previously in these Announcements.

Master of Arts Degree

Admission Requirements

Normally, an applicant's baccalaureate major will have been in theology, religious studies, or philosophy. Students with other academic backgrounds, however, will be considered if they demonstrate strong academic promise. All applicants must submit an example of an academic paper (or portion thereof) of 10-20 pages. The academic area of moral theology/ethics reserves the right to require other prerequisites which are deemed necessary for the success of applicants in their course of studies.

Degree Requirements

1. Thirty hours of coursework

2. Two significant research papers, which can be done in conjunction with two of their courses. This requirement is waived if the student chooses the thesis option. Students who choose the thesis option will sign up for 6 hours of thesis guidance, which counts towards the required hours of coursework.

3. The following courses are required:

a. TRS 630A Foundations of Christian Moral Life

b. TRS 660 History and Method in Theology, TRS 760A Theological Foundations, or TRS 780A Introduction to the Study of Religion

c. Three additional Moral Theology/Ethics courses

4. Additional courses may be chosen from among other areas of STRS or from other relevant disciplines outside of STRS.

5. Reading proficiency and facility for use in theological research in one modern language (normally French or German).

Comprehensive Examinations

The purpose of the M.A. comprehensive examination is to enable the student to synthesize issues and problems in the area of moral theology/ethics. The exams are given in the fall and spring semesters and the summer session on dates determined by the university. The current reading list and further explanation of the nature and purpose of the comprehensive examination are available in the main office. The comprehensive examination may not be taken until the language requirement has been satisfied. The examination will be graded on a pass/fail basis and may be repeated once in the event of failure.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

Prerequisites

Applicants should possess an M.A. in theology as offered by this faculty, or the equivalent of this degree. Ordinarily, applicants will have obtained 12 credit hours of undergraduate or graduate philosophy. Students who enter the moral theology/ethics Ph.D. program with academic deficiencies will be encouraged to audit courses to complement their doctoral level courses.

Requirements

1. Four semesters of residence.

2. Thirty-six hours of coursework after the M.A. degree.

a. Eighteen of those hours are to be taken in the area of moral theology/ethics, including the four moral theology/ethics core courses.

b. An additional six hours are electives, to taken in any of the academic areas of the School of Theology and Religious Studies.

c. At least 12 hours of coursework in two minor areas (six hours in each).

d. Students who have an M.A. from this school are exempted from one of the minor-area requirements.

e. The doctoral-level required pro-seminar.

f. Reading proficiency and facility for use in theological research in two modern languages (normally French and German) and either Latin or Greek.

3. Completion of a program proposal during the second semester of doctoral study.

4. Completion and filing of four research papers.

5. Successful completion of comprehensive examinations in moral theology/ethics.

a. The comprehensive examinations include both written exams and an oral exam.

b. There are three written examinations, in the following areas: general moral theology; the student's area of specialization within moral theology/ethics; the student's minor areas.

c. Each written exam is four hours in length. If a student has only one minor area, the minor area exam is only two hours in length. The subject matter of each examination will be based on a reading list, compiled by the student in consultation with and pending the approval of the student's comprehensive exam committee. The Comprehensive Exam Committee will consist of four examiners. Ordinarily, three examiners will come from the moral theology/ethics and the fourth examiner from a minor area.

d. The written exams may be scheduled over a period of up to seven days.

e. Following successful completion of the written portion of the comprehensive examinations, students will be given a 90-minute oral examination. The subject matter of the oral exam is the entirety of the book lists for the written exams. The oral examination is to be scheduled approximately one week following the completion of the written comprehensive examinations.

6. Upon successful completion of comprehensive exams, the student will apply to the academic area director of moral theology/ethics for candidacy. The moral theology/ethics faculty will evaluate the student's application for candidacy.

7. Writing and defense of a doctoral dissertation.

a. Each student must have his or her dissertation proposal approved by the requisite School and University committees.

b. Each student must complete and defend orally his or her dissertation before a dissertation examination board.

Religious Education/Catechetics

Professors Rev. Regis Armstrong, O.F.M.
Associate Professors Sister Margaret Mary Kelleher, O.S.U.; Rev. Raymond Studzinski, O.S.B.
Assistant Professors Sister Margaret Schreiber, O.P.
Professor Emeritus Rev. Berard Marthaler, O.F.M.
Distinguished Lecturer Rev. Gerard Sloyan

Nature and Goals

The concentration in religious education/catechetics is designed to prepare professionals for ministry in parishes, diocesan offices, religious publishing and as teachers of religion in elementary and secondary schools. The course of study deals with the foundation, history and theories of Christian education, and with the principles and dynamics of faith and moral development. Special emphasis is put on the liturgical life of the Church since worship not only celebrates faith but also shapes and expresses it. Overall, the graduate program provides criteria for designing and evaluating catechetical methods and materials, and also examines specific current issues in catechesis.

Master of Arts Degree

Requirements for Admission

Beyond the general STRS admission requirements, the following are also required:

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree. If the applicant's baccalaureate major was not religious studies, the academic area retains the right to require prerequisite courses in their course of studies.

  • Up to six credits from other accredited institutions at a grade level of B or above may be applied toward course requirements for the master's degree upon recommendation of the director of the academic area and with the approval of the dean of the School of Theology and Religious Studies.

Coursework

For the Master of Arts degree, either 24 hours of class work plus an M.A. thesis or 30 hours of coursework, six of which are taken in directed research, are required.

1. The following courses are required:

a. TRS 751F: Foundations of Religious Education/Catechetics

b. TRS 743A: Liturgical Catechesis

2. A demonstrated competence in reading one modern foreign language (normally French, Spanish or German) for purposes of research.

3. Two major research papers or an M.A. thesis (six credit hours); at least one of these papers will focus on a topic directly related to the study of Religious Education/Catechetics.

4. Successful completion of the comprehensive examination based on coursework and an M.A. reading list. The examination is based upon coursework and the M.A. reading list available from the academic area. It takes place on two days for four hours each day during the examination week designated in the university academic calendar.

Master of Religious Education (M.R.E.)

The Master of Religious Education, M.R.E., is a professional degree designated for those preparing for leadership positions in religious education/catechetics on the parish and diocesan level; teaching in elementary or secondary-level religion programs or those seeking catechetical, liturgical or theological updating and continuing education. The approach is interdisciplinary and draws upon theology, scripture, liturgy, history, psychology, social science and education with the context of contemporary culture. Academic and pastoral courses focused on the Hispanic/Latino experience are available for students, both Hispanic and non-Hispanic, preparing for ministry in the Hispanic/Latino community. Students have the opportunity for an internship/field placement.

While the M.R.E. provides a broad background expected of the professional in religious education/catechetics, the specific aims and needs of the student shape the program.

Requirements for Admission

Beyond the general STRS admission requirements, the following are also required:

  • A minimum of 12 undergraduate semester hours in theology and biblical studies.

  • Students for whom English is a second language will be required to show proficiency in oral and written English, usually through the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

The academic area retains the right to require additional prerequisite courses that are deemed necessary to the success of applicants in their program of studies. Six semester hours of work taken at another institution are, with the director's approval, applicable toward the M.R.E. degree.

Coursework

1. The M.R.E. degree consists of 30 semester hours of coursework in the Christian and especially Catholic tradition and in education or the behavioral sciences. All students must take an introductory course in catechetics (in most cases this will be TRS 751F: Foundations of Religious Education/Catechetics) as well as the Proseminar for Master's Students. It is the responsibility of the director of the academic area to evaluate each student's background in Scripture and to place the student in the proper courses as individual needs indicate.

2. Students are expected to maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average.

3. The student is required to write one formal paper describing a professional field project done in conjunction with a seminar or other courses. This may be in the form of a research paper or a written report on an aspect of an internship or fieldwork.

4. A foreign language is recommended but not required.

Comprehensive Examination

The M.R.E. comprehensive examination is normally taken during the student's final semester of coursework, on the dates designated in that semester's academic calendar. The student takes the examinations over the course of two days, the first on core subjects, and the second on electives.The subject matter for the M.R.E. comprehensive examination is taken from the courses that have made up the student's program. Students, therefore, should expect to be examined on the courses that they have taken in theology and religious studies and also those in education and the behavioral sciences. The M.R.E. comprehensive examination is evaluated in the same way as the M.A. examination.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

The Ph.D. degree prepares students for research, writing, and teaching on the college, university and seminary levels and for leadership in educational ministry.

The course of study deals with the foundations, history and theories of Christian education, the principles and dynamics of faith, evangelization and moral development as well as current approaches and issues in catechesis/religious education. The interdisciplinary program draws upon theology, scripture, liturgy, history, psychology, social science and education within the context of contemporary culture. Particular emphasis is placed on liturgical catechesis and the Church's sacramental life.

Requirements for Admission

M.A. in theology/religious studies or equivalent degree. The programs of students completing the M.A. or an equivalent program in another academic institution will be evaluated and additional prerequisite courses may be required.

Residency

Four semesters of residence.

Coursework

1. Minimum of 36 credit hours after M.A.

2. Proseminar for Doctoral Students.

3. Eighteen credit hours in the area of concentration. TRS 751F: Foundations of Religious Education-/Catechesis and TRS 743A: Liturgical Catechesis are required.

4. Twelve credit hours of electives are taken from courses within the School of Theology and Religious Studies on the 700-800 level.

5. Six credit hours are taken in an allied field either in the School of Theology and Religious Studies or in another school within The Catholic University of America.

6. Completion of four research papers [two if holding an M.A. from the School of Theology/Religious Studies], normally in conjunction with 700-800-level courses or seminars.

7. Maintenance of a 3.3 average in graduate work. Preparation of a program proposal within the second semester of coursework. The proposal contains the following headings: area of concentration, Catholic theology, electives and allied field. Under each of these headings the student will list regular courses, readings courses, research seminars and independent research projects. All such courses are to be listed by number title, professor, institution, number of credits and semester completed or anticipated. The student will also include previous M.A. courses under these headings. In addition, the proposal will provide the following information: major research papers listed by topic and professor; language requirements, and projected dissertation topic.

Languages

Reading proficiency in German and Spanish or French.

Comprehensive Examinations

Three days of written comprehensives within a semester time span are required. One day is directed to catechetics/religious education; one day to systematic and historical theology and electives; one day to the allied field. The examinations each day will consist of four questions, two of which the student answers. Content of comprehensive examinations: The student consults with a faculty person in each area of his or her program in the preparation and approval of three bibliographies, which form the content of the written examination. The bibliographies build and expand on the readings of coursework.

Admission to Ph.D. Candidacy

The faculty of the academic area votes on Ph.D. candidacy after successful completion of coursework, research papers, and comprehensive examinations. Upon admission to candidacy, the student must submit a dissertation proposal.

Spirituality

Professors Rev. Regis Armstrong, O.F.M.; Rev. James Wiseman, O.S.B., director
Associate Professor Rev. Raymond Studzinski, O.S.B.

 

Nature and Goals of the Academic Area

Spirituality focuses on a critical understanding of religious experience. Particular attention is given to the Christian tradition in the context of cross-cultural studies. Study of Asian religions and interreligious dialogue is also encouraged. Because human actions are both social and individual, the academic area addresses the personal, communal and political dimensions of spirituality. In dialogue with the Catholic theological tradition, spirituality also draws on the methods of philosophy, biblical studies, psychology, sociology and the history of religions to analyze religious experience as expressed in worship, contemplation, doctrine, catechesis, and the spiritual classics.

Master of Arts Degree

Requirements for Admission

Normally, an applicant's undergraduate major will have been religious studies, with some background in philosophy. Students with other backgrounds, however, will be considered if they demonstrate strong academic promise. It is expected that every applicant will have taken introductory work in both Old Testament and New Testament studies. The academic area may require prerequisite courses that are deemed necessary for the success of applicants in their course of studies. Work taken at other institutions is not normally applicable to the M.A. degree.

Coursework

For the Master of Arts degree, 24 hours of coursework plus a thesis or 30 hours of coursework are required.

The following courses are required:

1. TRS 650A: Introduction to the History of Christian Spirituality;

2. TRS 660: History and Method in Theology;

3. TRS 780A: Introduction to the Study of Religion;

4. TRS 750A or 750B: Classics in Christian Spirituality I or II;

5. Three credits in Catholic theology;

6. Three credits in biblical studies;

7. Twelve credits according to specialized interests, e.g., in religious development (or six credits of coursework plus a thesis).

Coursework must include two major research papers or an M.A. thesis (six credit hours); at least one of the papers will focus on a topic directly related to the study of spirituality.

M.A. students must demonstrate competence in reading one modern foreign language for purposes of research.

Candidates for the M.A. degree must successfully complete a comprehensive examination based on coursework and an M.A. reading list. The purpose of the M.A. comprehensive examination is to enable the student to synthesize understanding of issues and problems in the area of spirituality and related topics in theology and religious studies. It takes place on two days for four hours each day during the examination week designated in the university academic calendar. On each day of the exam the student is given eight questions related to coursework and the M.A. reading list and is asked to write essays for any four of those questions.

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

Requirements for Admission

A master's degree in theology/religious studies or its equivalent is required. Students who do not already have a graduate degree in theology/religious studies are required to obtain the M.A. in Spirituality before a decision is made about their admittance to doctoral studies. The programs of students who have completed the M.A. in another institution will be evaluated and prerequisite courses may be required (e.g., TRS 650A Introduction to the History of Christian Spirituality; TRS 660 History and Method in Theology [or TRS 760A Theological Foundations]; TRS 780A Introduction to the Study of Religion).The application must also include three letters of recommendation from people who can evaluate the applicant's ability to successfully complete a doctoral program.

Degree Requirements

Residence

Four semesters in full-time enrollment or the equivalent.

Coursework

A minimum of 36 credit hours beyond the M.A. (or a minimum of 30 credit hours if the student earned the M.A. in Spirituality from CUA). Eighteen (18) of these will be taken in Spirituality (or 12 if the student earned the M.A. in Spirituality from CUA). TRS 750A and TRS 750B, Classics in Christian Spirituality I and II, are required. Twelve (12) credits will be in electives taken from courses within the School of Theology and Religious Studies on the 700 and 800 levels. Nine (9) of these should be in Systematic/Historical Theology. Six (6) credits are to be taken in an allied field either within the School of Theology and Religious Studies or from another school within CUA. As part of their coursework, students will be required to produce four major research papers (two if holding an M.A. from CUA in theology/religious studies). These papers are to give evidence of an ability to do scholarly research and are normally written in conjunction with seminars on the 700 and 800 level. Two of them may be done as Directed Research.

During the first semester of their doctoral studies, students should draw up a proposal that identifies the areas in which they will do their coursework. This proposal is to be done in consultation with an adviser and is to be presented to the academic area for approval. In order to ensure implementation of the proposal, students are to consult with their advisers prior to registration each semester.

Languages

Reading proficiency in two modern languages (e.g., German, French, Spanish) is required. A reading knowledge of Latin is recommended. Students should consult with their advisor to determine if other languages are necessary for their proposed program of research.

Grade Point Average

Students must maintain a 3.3 grade point average.

Comprehensive Examination

Written comprehensive examinations are taken over three days. Ordinarily these are taken within one semester, at dates established by the calendar of the School of Theology and Religious Studies. One of these days is a comprehensive in the area of spirituality. Another of these days is in the area of historical and systematic theology. A final day is in a minor area of study related to elective courses which the student has taken.

The material for the comprehensives is taken from three bibliographies prepared by the student in consultation with a spirituality faculty member. For the comprehensive examination in spirituality, the student is asked to answer four questions out of eight. This examination lasts for four hours of total writing time. For the comprehensive examinations in historical/systematic theology, the student is asked to answer three questions out of six. This exam lasts for three hours of total writing time. For the comprehensive examination for the minor area, the student is asked to answer two questions out of four. This examination lasts for two hours of total writing time.

Comprehensive examinations are taken after a student has successfully completed coursework, research papers, and languages.

Ph.D. Candidacy

After a student has successfully completed the comprehensive examinations, the director of the academic area, after consulting with the faculty, recommends to the dean whether the student should be admitted to doctoral candidacy.

Ph.D. Dissertation Proposal

Upon admission to candidacy, students prepare their dissertation proposals in accord with the guidelines of the School of Theology and Religious Studies.

Religion and Culture

Professors William Dinges; Rev. John T. Ford, C.S.C.; Rev. James Wiseman, O.S.B.; Wilhelmus Valkenberg, M.Div., Ph.D
Associate Professors William Barbieri, director; Charles B. Jones; Sister Margaret Mary Kelleher, O.S.U.; Rev. Raymond Studzinski, O.S.B.
Assistant Professor Chad Pecknold


 

Goals of the Academic Area

This academic area emphasizes analysis of the ways that religious expressions have transformed cultures and have been transformed by them. The study of religion and culture incorporates two types of investigation. The first utilizes methods such as anthropology, hermeneutics, history, literary studies, psychology and sociology in the analysis of religion. The second attends to the history and teachings of non-Christian religions. These interdisciplinary methods help students to understand religion as a human phenomenon and to apply multiple approaches to its interpretation. Emphasis is placed on the critical study of symbol, ritual and myth and on the interchanges between religious traditions and their social and cultural forms. In addition to American civic and religious traditions, the Hispanic experience in the United States, religious movements, religions of Asia, and crosscultural and interreligious processes, subject matter includes the religious aspects of psychology, social development, morality, art, architecture, science, economics and politics. As an interdisciplinary area in the School of Theology and Religious Studies, religion and culture pursues active dialogue with the Catholic tradition in theology.

Master of Arts Degree

Coursework

For the Master of Arts degree, 30 hours of coursework are required. The following three-credit courses are mandatory: TRS 760: Theological Foundations or TRS 660: History and Method in Theology; and TRS 780A: Introduction to the Study of Religion. Students also take nine credits in religion and culture courses, including three credits devoted to the cross-cultural study of religion or the study of a religious tradition other than Christianity. Nine additional credits may be selected from school courses related to the Catholic theological tradition, including offerings in historical and systematic theology, biblical studies, spirituality and religious education. Finally, six credits are to be taken in directed research, either in two specialized seminars or via a master's thesis. M.A. students must pass a proficiency test in one modern language. At least one full year of residence is required of M.A. candidates.

Comprehensive Examination

The purpose of the M.A. comprehensive examination is to enable the student to develop a synthesized understanding of issues and problems in the area of religion and culture. The examination consists of two parts administered on separate days, the first dealing with foundational questions in the study of religion and the Catholic tradition, and the second addressing more specialized topics in the field of religion and culture. The questions for the exam are based on area reading lists corresponding to its two parts as well as on the student's coursework. The reading list is available from the area website. The M.A. comprehensive examination is normally taken in the final semester of coursework, on dates designated in that semester's academic calendar.

 

Doctor of Philosophy Degree

Coursework

For the Ph.D., a minimum of 36 credit hours of coursework beyond the M.A. is required. TRS 760: Theological Foundations or TRS 660: History and Method in Theology; and TRS 780A: Introduction to the Study of Religion, if not taken at the M.A. level, are required, as is a course in hermeneutics: either TRS 760B: Theology, Culture, and Hermeneutics; or TRS 780B: Religion and Hermeneutics. At least 21 credits should be in the field of religion and culture, including at least three credits devoted to the cross-cultural study of religion or the study of a religious tradition other than Christianity. In addition, at least nine credits should be in the Catholic theological tradition, and six credits in an allied area of specialization chosen from some other area of the school or department of the university (e.g., anthropology, sociology, philosophy).

Upon formal admission to the doctoral program, students consult with faculty advisers to project their full course of study. This will usually include all courses listed above for the M.A. degree. The director of the academic area, in conjunction with area faculty, gives final approval to each student's program of studies, normally at the end of the first semester of coursework.

All Ph.D. programs will include the completion of at least four major research papers (three if holding an M.A. from CUA in theology/religious studies) that give evidence of the student's ability to do scholarly research; these are done at the 800 level, normally in conjunction with research seminars. Students must maintain a 3.3 grade point average.

Languages

Doctoral students are required to demonstrate reading proficiency in two modern languages (e.g., French, German, Spanish, Chinese, Hindi or other as determined by the needs of their proposed research), either by passing an examination offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures or by a suitable alternative means. In addition, proficiency in each of these languages should be evidenced in at least one of the student's major research papers.

Comprehensive Examination

Comprehensive examinations are taken after a student has successfully completed coursework, research papers and languages, on dates specified by the school calendar. The comprehensive examination is a written test administered on three days, for four hours each day. One day of the examination will cover general topics in religion and culture. A second day will require demonstration of competence in the Catholic theological tradition. The third day will jointly address the subfield that has been designated as the area for dissertation research and the allied area chosen by the student.

Questions for the examination are based on a detailed bibliography developed by the student in conjunction with a faculty adviser.
 

Ph.D. Candidacy

After a student has successfully completed the comprehensive examinations, the director of the academic area, after consulting with the faculty, will recommend to the dean that the student be admitted to doctoral candidacy. Upon admission to candidacy, the student may submit a dissertation proposal. Proposals must be approved by a committee of at least three faculty members, including at least two from the academic area; by the area faculty as a body; and by the School Ph.D. Committee.

Dissertations are to be completed and defended orally in accordance with the School's and University's general procedures and requirements.

Pastoral Studies

Associate Clinical Professor Msgr. Stephen Rossetti
Assistant Clinical Professor Rev. Romuald Meogrossi, O.F.M., Conv.
Associate Clinical Professor  Rev. Richard DeLillio


 Goals of the Program

The Goal of Pastoral Studies is to prepare students for ordination in the Catholic Church or for lay ministry through a coordinated program of courses in academic subjects, pastoral skills and supervised ministry.

Master of Divinity Degree

Nature and Goals

Since the Master of Divinity (M.Div.) is a first professional degree, the purpose of this program is to foster basic theological understanding and to develop initial pastoral competence on the part of students preparing for ministry. Accordingly, the M.Div. curriculum involves an in-depth study of the Christian, especially the Roman Catholic, theological tradition, and a supervised practice of ministry. The program offers an optional Concentration in Hispanic Ministry that has additional requirements involving the Spanish language and Hispanic studies and placement.

Degree Requirements

Requirements for Admission

1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university.

2. An undergraduate foundation in philosophy, consisting of a minimum of 12 credit hours drawn from the following areas: history of philosophy, logic, metaphysics, ethics, philosophy of God, and philosophical anthropology.

3. A reading knowledge of Latin.

Coursework

The M.Div. degree requires a minimum of 90 credit hours of graduate courses distributed as follows: systematic theology (18), moral theology (12), biblical studies (12), and one course each in canon law, church history, liturgical studies and spirituality (12), academic electives (12), pastoral ministry (18) and the ministry seminars (6). All students are ordinarily required to take six credits of Basic Supervised Ministry. At least one course must be taken in a non-Catholic ecclesial tradition through the offerings of the Washington Theological Consortium. All students entering the program must take the following courses in the first fall semester: Proseminar for Master's Students, Introduction to the History and Method of Theology, and Foundations of Christian Moral Life. 

Ministry Seminars

The ministry seminars are designed to be the primary aid in achieving an integration of theoretical and practical aspects of the program. Because the nature of the seminar is to integrate pastorally what the student has learned academically, the seminars should be taken as late in the student's course of study as possible. In conjunction with each seminar, a student is expected to prepare a reflection paper that demonstrates academic research and its application to the practice of ministry.

Language Requirement

Students are expected to have a reading knowledge of Latin. Since Latin is considered a prerequisite, it must be satisfied by the end of the first fall semester in the program.

Course Load

According to university regulations, the normal course load for graduate students is 12 credit hours per semester; the minimum load for full-time graduate students is eight credit hours. To fulfill prerequisites for the M.Div. program, a student is permitted to enroll for a maximum of 15 credit hours if she or he has a grade point average of 3.0 or higher and receives permission from the associate dean for seminary and ministerial programs. Students with the requisite background can complete the Master of Divinity program within three years; students often complete the program in seven or eight semesters.

Grade Point Average

Students must maintain a grade point average of at least 2.75 in their coursework to be eligible for the M.Div. degree. Students who incur two or more failing grades in formal coursework are subject to academic dismissal.

Transfer Students

Students transferring into the School of Theology and Religious Studies from another institution may ask to have up to 45 credits applied to their M.Div. degree from their former institution, provided that these credits are at the grade level B or higher and are comparable to those required by the M.Div. degree as administered by the school. The associate dean for seminary and ministerial programs will make the final decision about the number of credits to be applied.

Master of Divinity in Hispanic Ministry Degree

Nature and Goals

The Catholic University of America is in the unique position of offering a program in Hispanic Ministry that draws upon the resources of a major academic research institution, as well as on the resources of a large Hispanic community in the Washington metropolitan area. Students concentrating in Hispanic ministry are able to take courses not only in various academic areas of the School of Theology and Religious Studies, but also in other schools and departments of the university (such as Canon Law, Music, Social Service, Modern Languages, History and Anthropology).

In addition to a well-rounded academic background, the program provides hands-on practical experience to those interested in serving the Hispanic/Latino community in the United States.

Serving the Church in the Local Community

The goal of the concentration in Hispanic Ministry is to prepare M.Div. students to play an active role in the life of the Hispanic Catholic community in North America. The program is designed so that students can learn not only about the Latin American background of Hispanics/Latinos, but also about the identity and contributions of the Hispanic/Latino population in the United States. Students have the opportunity to engage in historical, social, pastoral and theological reflection on this increasingly significant population of the North American Catholic Church.

Concentration Requirements

The M.Div. concentration in Hispanic Ministry supplements the standard M.Div. degree through three types of courses at the graduate level:

1. Language proficiency.

2. Hispanic theology and culture.

3. Pastoral theology (three credits in Hispanic Ministry plus field placement and competency in sacramental ministry).

Doctor of Ministry Degree

Nature and Goals

The Doctor of Ministry degree is a 36-credit hour professional doctorate offering students advanced theological and pastoral formation for competent and effective ministry. The program combines theory and pastoral experience and focuses on the integration of biblical, theological and pastoral knowledge for excellence in ministry. It draws upon the resources of the School of Theology and Religious Studies and other departments and schools at The Catholic University of America, as well as the schools of the Washington Theological Consortium and the Consortium of Universities.

Beginning in Fall 2011, The Doctor of Ministry degree is only offered during the regular academic year; the summer D.Min. three-week sessions are discontinued at this time. Students complete the program by designing and implementing a project in ministry within their ministerial context.

Areas of Specialization

The D.Min. may be obtained in one of the following specializations:

  • Adult spiritual formation

  • Catechetics

  • Formation ministry

  • Spiritual direction

  • Ministry through the life cycle

  • Marriage and family ministry

  • Pastoral care

  • Pastoral counseling

  • Word and worship

  • Liturgical studies

  • Preaching

Requirements for Admission

1. Possession of a M.Div. degree or its educational equivalent with a cumulative average of 3.0 or better.

2. A minimum of three years of full-time service in pastoral ministry.

3. Completion of the Personal History Form, which includes a brief history of the academic, pastoral and vocational background of the applicant and an essay of 1,000 to 2,000 words presenting the applicant's personal history and goals in ministry.

Coursework

A total of 36 hours beyond the M.Div. or its equivalent is required. A maximum of six credit hours may be transferred from work completed elsewhere. The following is the distribution of courses for students entering with the M.Div. or its equivalent:

Fifteen credits of core courses as follows:

1. D.Min. Pastoral Supervision (3)

2. Pastoral Theology (3)

3. Small Groups in Pastoral Ministry (3)

4. Principles of Adult Religious Education

5. Pastoral Planning and Evaluation (2)

6. Doctor of Ministry Seminar (2)

Fifteen credits in the area of specialization. Six credits for Project in Ministry.

Grade Point Average

Students are expected to maintain a grade point average of at least 3.0 in their coursework to be eligible for the D.Min. degree.

Candidacy

A student may apply for candidacy after completing 24 credit hours of doctoral level coursework. The student may not receive candidacy and hold the consultation on the D.Min. Project during the same semester.

D.Min. Project

The D.Min. Project is ordinarily related to the concentration in which the student is enrolled. It is intended to demonstrate the student's ability to identify a problem in ministry and to discover appropriate interdisciplinary resources and theologically and pastorally relevant methods for its resolution. Ordinarily, the project has three components:

1. Research, including familiarity with current literature on the problem and its theological background.

2. Experience, including a significant amount of time spent working with the problem in a specific pastoral situation.

3. Evaluation, offering an interdisciplinary analysis of data along with an appraisal of the methods employed and the theological principles involved..

Joint Degree Programs

Master of Arts in Catholic Educational Leadership

A program in Catholic educational leadership culminating in the M.A. degree is offered in conjunction with the Department of Education within the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Theology and Religious Studies. This program requires 36 semester hours and is intended for administrators, principals, directors of religious education and others whose primary work is curriculum planning and educational administration in Catholic schools and catechetical programs.

Admission

A student must apply for admission to the Department of Education in the School of Arts and Sciences. Prerequisites include a minimum of 12 semester hours of undergraduate work in education and 12 semester hours of formal coursework in religious studies, a 3.5 grade point average in the last 60 semester hours of undergraduate work, and acceptable scores for the Graduate Record Examination or the Miller Analogy Test.

Degree Requirements

The program requires 36 semester hours including a practicum, research papers, and the following courses:

 

EDUC 701 Philosophic Foundations of Education 3
EDUC 720 Emerging Leadership Theory 3
EDUC 765 Principles of Curriculum 3
TRS 751A Teaching and Learning: Focus on Catechetics 3
TRS 562 The Creeds in Theology and Christian Life 3
TRS 743A Liturgical Catechesis 3

Candidates for the degree must maintain at least a B (3.0) average and pass comprehensive examinations upon completion of coursework. 

  

Joint Degree Program Combined Master of Arts / Master of Science in Library Science

A joint master's degree program in Religious Studies and in Library and Information Science provides students with a background for professional practice in a variety of settings. It also allows students to obtain two graduate degrees sooner than they could acquire each independently. Applicants for joint degrees must submit complete and separate applications (including the application fee and all required supporting documents) to both degree-granting units of the university. Joint degrees are conferred simultaneously after all requirements for both degrees have been met.

The joint M.A./M.S. in L.S. degree requires a total of 51 graduate semester hours in the two disciplines. Two specializations are available: Religious Studies and Archival Management, and General Librarianship and Religious Studies. The master's program in the School of Theology and Religious Studies introduces students to resources, issues, and research methods in religion, theology, church history, and allied fields, and will normally be tailored to specialize in one of the School's academic areas. The program in library and information science certifies the student's competency in professional practice.

 

Joint Degree: The Sacred Theology Baccalaureate and The Master of Divinity Degree

Overview

The School of Theology and Religious Studies offers both ecclesiastical and civil degrees.. The Master of Divinity degree is a civil professional degree, recognized in the United States and Canada by the Association of Theological Schools (ATS). The Pontifical Sacred Theological Baccalaureate degree is a first level graduate ecclesial academic degree. The offering of the joint degrees serves to accentuate both the professional and academic realities together with a recognized civil and ecclesial degree program.

Requirements

Admission

1. A bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university.

2. Superior achievement and the ability to pursue graduate work as indicated by official transcripts from previous institutions of study.

3. The results of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or Miller Analogies Test (MAT). However, GRE scores (vs. MAT or TOEFL) are necessary for applicants to be considered for most university scholarships.

4. Non-native English-speakers must demonstrate evidence of English proficiency through submission of Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) scores or through some other means.

5. At least three academic letters of recommendation must be submitted.

6. An undergraduate foundation in philosophy (18 credits or equivalent), which includes a demonstrated background in the following areas: history of philosophy, logic, metaphysics, ethics, philosophy of God and philosophical anthropology.

7. An undergraduate background in religious studies that has provided: (6 credits or equivalents) an introduction to Old Testament literature and an introduction to New Testament literature.

8. A reading knowledge of Latin.

Course Work (99 credits)

All of these courses are existing courses that are normally offered. No new courses are envisioned as the result of this joint degree proposal.

 1. Proseminars

2. Foundational- twenty-one (21) credits: Introduction to History and Method in Theology (3), Foundations of Christian Moral Life (3), Introduction to Patristic Theology (3), Introduction to Liturgy and Sacraments (3), Pastoral Theology (3), Introduction to Christian Spirituality (3), Basic Principles of Canon Law (3). In addition, Introduction to History and Method in Theology and Foundations of Christian Moral Life must be taken by S.T.B./MDiv students during the first year in the program.

3. Systematic theology - fifteen (15) credits, selected from: Revelation and Faith (3), Theology of God (3), Christian Anthropology (3), Christology (3), Theology of the Church (3), Christian Eschatology (3).

4. Liturgical studies and sacramental theology - six (6) credits, selected from: Sacraments of Initiation (3), Eucharist (3), Ordained Ministries(3), Sacraments of Reconciliation and Anointing (3).

5. Moral theology - nine (9) credits: Marriage (3), Christian Social and Political Ethics (3), Biomedical Ethics (3).

6. Scripture - fifteen (15) credits: two courses from Old Testament offerings (6), two courses from New Testament offerings (6), one course chosen from either set of offerings (3). These courses are to be chosen from the following: Pentateuch; Prophets; Psalms; Wisdom Literature; Synoptics; John; Pauline Letters.

7. Church history (3) - three credits: one course chosen from the appropriate offerings.

8. Academic electives (9) – nine credits

9. Pastoral ministry (15)fifteen credits - (Pastoral Theology already in the foundational courses above) All students are ordinarily required to take six credits of Basic Supervised Ministry.

10. Ministry seminars (6) – six credits.

11. Students who are candidates for priesthood in the Roman Catholic Church must take one course in a non-Roman Catholic ecclesial tradition during the course of studies.

Language Requirement

Students are expected to have a reading knowledge of Latin. Since Latin is considered a prerequisite, it must be satisfied by the end of the first fall semester in the program.

Course Load

No student may carry a course load beyond 15 credits. With the approval of the dean, and under the condition that the course is not being offered in a given term, one course per term may ordinarily be taken outside the school. To ensure the academic integrity of the degree, only one course from each academic area may be taken outside the school.

Grade Point Average

The student must maintain a grade point average of 2.75 or above.

Transfer Students

Students transferring into the School of Theology and Religious Studies from another institution may ask to have up to 45 credits applied to their joint STB/M.Div. degree from their former institution, provided that these credits are at the grade level B or higher and are comparable to those required by the M.Div. degree as administered by the school. The associate dean for seminary and ministerial programs will make the final decision about the number of credits to be applied.

Comprehensive Examination

To qualify for the comprehensive examination, the student must have satisfied the Latin requirement and have a grade point average of 2.75 or above. The awarding of the S.T.B. degree also depends on the successful completion of the comprehensive examination.

Usually the student takes the comprehensive examination in the last semester of study. The subject matter of the examination is material covered in the courses in systematic and sacramental theology, moral theology and Scripture. Past exam questions and a list of themes and readings for review are available from the Office of the Associate Dean for Seminary and Ministerial Studies.

Students may choose either three hours of written examination or one hour of oral examination before three members of the faculty. In order to pass the comprehensive exam, a student must receive an average grade of 2.5 (on a scale of 0 to 4.0) on the exam. A candidate for the S.T.B. degree may not continue candidacy after two failures in the comprehensive examination.

 

STB and Master of Divinity in Hispanic Ministry Degree

Requirements

The joint STB and M.Div. degrees have one possible concentration in Hispanic Ministry. This concentration focuses the standard STB and M.Div. degree through the selection of graduate courses in these three areas:

1. Language proficiency.

2. Hispanic theology and culture.

3. Pastoral theology (three credits in Hispanic Ministry plus field placement and competency in sacramental ministry).

 

Six Year Ph.B.-S.T.B. Program

In conjunction with the School of Philosophy at the Catholic University of America, the School of Theology and Religious Studies offers a six-year joint Bachelor of Philosophy, Ph.B., and Bachelor of Sacred Theology, S.T.B., degree program for qualified students. This six-year joint Ph.B.-S.T.B. program is an integrated program of 64 three-credit courses leading to the two degrees. To complete the program in six years requires a total of four courses distributed in the first two summers of the program. For more information please contact the Office the Associate Dean for the Seminary and Ministerial Programs.
 

Educational Affiliations Institutes and Opportunities

The academic areas of the School of Theology and Religious Studies, through the research and professional degree programs they offer, are intended to make significant contributions to the Church and to society. Insofar as these very disciplines are related to the ever-present pastoral needs of the Church, the school provides a variety of programs to ensure the essential dialogue between those who do research and those who are most affected by it. In order to accomplish these goals more effectively, the school has entered into agreements with other institutes, schools and professional institutions.

Since the academic public of the school includes seminarians; lay men and women preparing for teaching, research, or other ministries in the Church and academic life, ordained priests, and men and women religious, it has been important to develop cooperative relationships with other academic and professional resources. In addition, the interest in continuing education has changed the educational opportunities available to all those involved in pastoral ministry. The School of Theology and Religious Studies is committed to serving the Church by developing and consolidating a variety of educational programs.


 

Preparation for Ordination

Education for ordained ministry at The Catholic University of America derives from a 1927 mandate of the university's Board of Trustees to provide a seminary course for the education of candidates for the priesthood.

The education of seminarians has been a fitting part of the university's mission to be of service to the Church by preparing its future leaders. The Code of Canon Law (c. 250), the Ratio Fundamentalis Institutionis Sacerdotalis of the Sacred Congregation for Catholic Education (nos. 61 and 76) and the Program of Priestly Formation of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops call for four years of theological education in preparation for priestly ordination. The degree programs in theology and pastoral studies offer and strongly recommend an eight-semester program of theological studies for seminarians. The degree programs offered afford a variety of opportunities for students preparing for ordination to obtain recognized academic and professional degrees. The ecclesiastical degrees are acknowledged internationally as preparation for priestly ministry. The S.T.B. degree can be obtained in three years. It can be followed by the S.T.L. and the S.T.D. degrees. In addition to the academic courses required by the degree, opportunities are provided for students to participate in pastoral courses that integrate theology, pastoral ministry and supervised experiential learning. The Master of Divinity program is an advantageous way for students to prepare themselves for a variety of ministries in the Church. The program requirements demand that students integrate academic work and pastoral experience in view of future ministry. Seminarians may also opt to pursue the S.T.B. and M.Div. jointly. Students also have the opportunity to do specialized work in preparation for particular ministries, such as Hispanic ministry. The judgments about a candidate's qualifications and readiness for ordination belong to the candidate and to the seminary or house of studies in which he is enrolled with the final judgment made by his ecclesiastical superior.

The School of Theology and Religious Studies does not assume this responsibility, but it does provide an evaluation of the academic performance and the professional capabilities of the students enrolled in its programs. Acceptance into (or exclusion from), as well as completion of, any of the degree programs of the school does not imply a judgment on the qualifications of a student for ordination. Since the preparation for ordination to the priesthood requires not only theological studies but also human, spiritual and pastoral formation (cf. Program of Priestly Formation), a candidate for ordination must also be enrolled in a seminary or house of studies. Theological College, the university seminary, provides the human and spiritual formation necessary for ordination. Here students preparing for diocesan priesthood find the resources and competent help in integrating personally all aspects of their preparation for ordained ministry. Other seminaries and houses of formation in Washington, D.C., and the metropolitan area also use the schools of philosophy and theology and religious studies for the philosophical and theological preparation of men for priestly ministry. The associate dean for seminary and ministerial studies coordinates the association of all seminaries with the school's academic program.

Intellectual Formation of Seminarians in Theology

The School of Theology and Religious Studies at The Catholic University of America boasts a faculty of distinguished, often internationally renowned, scholars.

Many professors are the authors of texts used in colleges, seminaries and universities throughout the United States. Seminarians at Theological College are registered in the school with access to the faculty in all the academic areas of study: biblical studies and languages; Church history and historical theology; liturgical studies and sacramental theology; moral theology/ethics; pastoral studies such as Hispanic ministry, religious education/catechetics, spirituality and supervised ministry; religion and culture; and dogmatic and systematic theology.

Seminarians may take courses that draw on the resources and talents of more than 40 scholars. Because the school is an ecclesiastical as well as a recognized civil faculty, it grants a wide variety of civil, ecclesiastical and pastoral degrees. All seminarians are required to complete ordination requirements established by the Program on Priestly Formation promulgated by the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops. These requirements include Scripture, systematic theology, moral theology, liturgy, history and canon law. They also include direct service to the poor, supervised ministry, two years of parish placement, preaching and celebration. The School of Theology and Religious Studies cooperates with Theological College and other houses of studies to provide these additional programs. Seminarians ordinarily enroll in one of three degree programs with the guidance of the associate dean for seminary and ministerial programs and his staff of advisers:

  • The Master of Divinity degree, M.Div. a first professional degree for seminarians for whom the pastoral focus of academic formation in all the academic areas of Catholic theology is especially significant.

  • The Master of Arts Degree, M.A. in theology for seminarians who wish to pursue a more specific academic program.

  • Bachelor of Sacred Theology, S.T.B. a first ecclesiastical degree that provides seminarians with a basic theological orientation in Catholic theology.

The School of Theology and Religious Studies also offers a Licentiate in Sacred Theology, S.T.L.; a Doctor of Sacred Theology, S.T.D., a Doctor of Philosophy, Ph.D., and a Doctor of Ministry degree, D.Min.. The licentiate and the doctorate in theology are advanced ecclesiastical degrees, with concentrations in historical theology, liturgical studies, and moral and systematic theology. The doctor of ministry is a professional doctorate that focuses upon pastoral ministry in adult spiritual formation, liturgical studies, and pastoral care and counseling. Qualified seminarians who complete their first graduate degrees prior to ordination can often begin work on an advanced degree or one of the many other degree programs in the school. Seminarians may also benefit from more than 250 elective course offerings available at The Catholic University of America and 10 other independent ecumenical schools of theology that are in the Washington Theological Consortium. During their matriculation at the university, seminarians will be required to take at least one course in another ecclesial tradition through the consortium. Through a cooperative agreement with the Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family, seminarians, as well as other graduate students in the school, can elect coursework in this highly specialized academic area to prepare for ordination. In summary, seminarians have the opportunity to integrate the traditional intellectual riches of Catholic theology, its interaction with contemporary cultures and other religious traditions, and a supervised pastoral commitment. Together these elements should form not only competent, faithful priests, but genuine pastoral leaders in the Churchc
 

Intellectual Formation of Seminarians in Pre-Theology

 

In accord with the vision and norms of the Program of Priestly Formation, Fifth Edition, for pre-theology studies, the School of Philosophy in association with the School of Theology and Religious Studies offers a comprehensive and flexible pre-theology program for candidates for priestly ministry. The School of Philosophy offers a coordinated series of philosophy courses for the intellectual formation of pre-theology students in all the areas of philosophy specified by the Program of Priestly Formation. The School of Theology and Religious Studies offers the full range of theology courses specified for this program, and the university has rich offerings in ancient and modern languages, Catholic art and culture, literature, public speaking, and other fields.
 
Certificate Program in Pre-Theology Studies
The School of Philosophy offers a two-year program in pre-theology studies leading to the Certificate in Pre-Theology Studies. Candidates for the certificate are matriculated in the School of Philosophy and follow a course of studies determined by the vision and norms of the Program of Priestly Formation, Fifth Edition, for pre-theology studies as specified below. For qualified candidates the certificate program may be combined with studies for the degree of master of arts or licentiate in philosophy. Interested students should consult the announcement from the School of Philosophy for further details.

Theological College

University Seminary
The Catholic University of America not only offers diocesan students preparing for the priesthood programs of theological instruction and professional pastoral training essential for priestly ministry, but also collaborates with Theological College, which provides for spiritual formation and personal readiness for ordination.
Here the students preparing for diocesan priesthood find\the resources and competent help in integrating personally all aspects of their preparation for ministry.
 
Seminary Faculty
The direction of Theological College has been entrusted to the Sulpician Fathers, a group of diocesan priests whose apostolate for 300 years has been preparation of men for priestly service. Assisting the rector are associates whose primary responsibility is formational work: guidance, spiritual life, liturgy, prayer and evaluation. Every seminarian has a priest as spiritual director. Seminary faculty members also serve as advisers to a number of students, meeting regularly with each, to help them internalize their multidimensional learning and experiences into personal and religious growth and ministerial readiness.
 
Students
Students are sent to Theological College by bishops throughout the United States. At present there is an enrollment of 72 students from more than 38 (arch) dioceses. Fourteen of these men are recipients of the Basselin Scholarship for Philosophical Studies and Pre-Theology Education.
 
Priestly Formation
The goal of Theological College and its faculty is to assist seminarians in the task of preparation, through the resources of Theological College and Catholic University, for priestly life and ministry in the Church in the United States. All aspects of priestly formation are accomplished according to the directives of the fifth edition of The Program of Priestly Formation (PPF, 2006), the normative guidelines approved by the American Bishops and the Congregation for Catholic Education for priestly education in the United States. In implementing these guidelines, Theological College has developed a local mission statement and programs to carry out its mission.
 
Community Life
The seminary faculty and seminarians form a community united in faith under the headship of the Lord Jesus Christ. Together they engage in the work of priestly formation that has four dimensions as the Apostolic Exhortation Pastores Dabo Vobis indicates: human, spiritual, intellectual and pastoral. Theological College's Student Handbook examines these dimensions of priestly formation, outlining more specifically the manner of implementation at a university-based seminary. Seminarians thereby receive clearly stated expectations for each dimension of priestly formation. Rector's conferences and small group discussions provide opportunities to reflect on questions of priestly spirituality in a format that involves peer interaction. Theological College supports a student government structure so that the seminarians, according to their level of competency, may be involved in implementing the goals of the seminary.
 
Spiritual Formation Program
The primary concern of the Theological College faculty is the personal-spiritual formation of the seminarians. The program relies on three dynamics. The first derives from its Sulpician heritage as expressed by Father Olier in his maxim, "To live supremely for God in Christ Jesus." The second dynamic derives from reflection on the way in which good and effective priests live and minister today; this speaks to the need for a personal spirituality that will sustain the seminarian after ordination. The third dynamic derives from the unique circumstances in which Theological College is situated, viz. a viz., a university setting which gathers students from many different dioceses, each with its respective ministerial needs.
The seminarians come together daily for Eucharist and the Morning and Evening Prayer from the Liturgy of Hours. Every seminarian works with a spiritual director of his choosing with whose help he can deepen his response to God's love, especially in developing a solid prayer life.
Community celebrations of Reconciliation are held on a regular basis, but seminarians have access to many resources for private celebration of this sacrament. Besides the annual retreat there are other prayer experiences scheduled during the year.
 
Formation Advising/Evaluation Program
In their efforts to assist the bishops who have sent their students to Theological College, the faculty engages in a process of advisement and evaluation in a spirit of service to the student and to the diocese. Accordingly, every seminarian has a priest adviser from the seminary faculty who will be concerned with the seminarian's progress toward personal maturity, his readiness to embrace the commitments of priestly life, his grasp of theology and completion of ordination requirements, and his acquisition of the pastoral skills needed for priestly ministry. An annual evaluation that records a student's progress according to the essential dimensions of priestly formation-human, spiritual, intellectual and pastoral-is sent to the bishop.
 
Theological and Pastoral Programs
For the theological and pastoral dimensions of his preparation, the seminarian is enrolled in the School of Theology and Religious Studies. He may pursue one of three first graduate degrees: the M.A. in theology, the Bachelor of Sacred Theology, S.T.B., or the Master of Divinity, M.Div. Each has its respective focus and integrating features. All seminarians have to complete ordination requirements that include Scripture, systematics, moral theology, liturgy, history and canon law; also included are direct service to the poor, supervised ministry to the sick, two years of parish placement, preaching and celebration.
The resources of the program are enriched through its membership in the Washington Theological Consortium. The seminarian may cross-register into some courses offered by member institutions.
 
Pre-Theology
Theological College offers a complete two-year pre-theology program according to the directives of the PPF (no. 185). Pre-theology encompasses human, spiritual, intellectual and pastoral formation. The pre-theology program is adapted to meet the specific needs of individuals and their dioceses. The pre-theology program utilizes the resources of the School of Philosophy and the School of Theology and Religious Studies to meet all the requirements of the PPF. At the same time, the program is adapted to meet the varying needs of the candidates.
 
Joint Degree Program
As of the 2009-2010 academic year, seminarians at Theological College can work for the M.Div. and the S.T.B. degrees at the same time. Contact the seminary office for details.
 

Ecumenical and Interreligious Affiliations

The School of Theology and Religious Studies seeks to bring critical inquiry, experimentation and reflection to the Roman Catholic tradition of faith. In cooperation with other schools of the university, the school attempts to realize an ideal that the Second Vatican Council proposed for institutions of higher learning, namely, "That the Christian mind may achieve, as it were, a public, persistent and universal presence in the whole enterprise of advancing higher culture" (Declaration on Christian Education, 10). Moreover, the school is committed to investigate and advance ecumenical and interreligious questions and relationships (Sapientia Christiana, 69). Its faculty moves beyond study to engage other Christian churches and the religions of the world in dialogue. As a minimum condition for these concerns, the school rejects "every type of discrimination, whether social or cultural, whether based on sex, race, color, social condition, language or religion as contrary to God's intent" (Pastoral Constitution of the Church in the Modern World, 29). In 1998, the then School of Religious Studies founded the Institute for Interreligious Study and Dialogue in the area of interfaith dialogue.

Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family

The Pontifical John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and Family is a graduate theological school founded by the Holy Father in 1982 to help develop more fully the Church's understanding of the person, marriage and family in the light of divine revelation. The Washington, D.C. Session of the institute began its work in fall 1988. The Institute is a community of scholars, global in its environment and vision and multidisciplinary in its academic scope. The programs of study foster the theological competency necessary for teaching and research and for the exercise of a variety of Christian ministries, including counseling and pastoral work in the specialized areas of marriage and the family, and for religious leadership positions, especially in Family Life Bureaus. The institute offers three degree programs: a specialized Doctorate in Sacred Theology (S.T.D.), a Licentiate in Sacred Theology of marriage and family (S.T.L.), and a Master of Theological Studies (M.T.S.) in marriage and family. In 2002 The Catholic University of America and the John Paul II Institute for Studies on Marriage and the Family entered into a cooperative agreement through which students enrolled in degree programs in either institution could take two courses during an academic year with the permission of the respective deans. Please consult the catalogue of the institute available through the office of the dean of the School of Theology and Religious Studies or the dean of the John Paul II Institute,

E-mail: information@johnpaulii.edu.
Web site: www.johnpaulii.edu.

Washington Theological Consortium

The Catholic University of America was one of the founding member institutions of the Washington Theological Consortium in 1967. Since its incorporation in 1971, the consortium has worked actively to coordinate programs of theological education among and for its founding member institutions, which include the Dominican House of Studies, Howard University Divinity School, Episcopal Theological Seminary, Washington Theological Union, Wesley Theological Seminary and Lutheran Theological Seminary (at Gettysburg, Pa.) The consortium fosters ecumenical and academic cooperation through faculty committees, team-taught courses in specialized areas, publication of a guide to the extensive library resources in the member institutions, cross-listing of course offerings, and the like. Through the Consortium, CUA students may register for courses at member institutions through the CUA Office of Enrollment Services, and such courses will automatically be added to the student's transcript with no extra procedures necessary. Students should consult the associate deans for ministerial studies and graduate studies concerning registration for courses in other institutions of the consortium. A booklet of course Announcements, both consortium-sponsored courses and other recommended courses, is available from the Office of the Dean.

Other Educational Opportunities

The academic areas of the School of Theology and Religious Studies, through the research and professional degree programs they offer, are intended to make significant contributions to the Church. Insofar as these very disciplines are related to the ever-present pastoral needs of the Church, the school provides a variety of programs to ensure the essential dialogue between those who do research and those who are most affected by it.

The recent societal interest in continuing education has revolutionized the educational opportunities available to those involved in pastoral ministry. The School of Theology and Religious Studies is committed to serving the Church by offering a variety of continuing educational programs.

Course Audit and Postdoctoral Audit

Certain courses offered each semester are open to those who wish to enroll as special students for the purpose of auditing. Without being obliged to complete the specific course requirements, students are allowed to participate in order to pursue their lifelong learning in those disciplines of interest. Postdoctoral audit is a privilege that may be extended under certain circumstances by the dean of the school. Past events have included national conferences honoring the Year of Paul and the Year of the Priest.

Workshops

The School of Theology and Religious Studies sponsors workshops on timely issues. Concerned with diocesan and parochial problems, these workshops provide an opportunity to reflect on their mission together with the faculty and the participants. Information on any of the continuing education programs is available from the School of Theology and Religious Studies, The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064.

 

School of Theology and Religious Studies Students' Association

The official organization of the students in this school is the School of Theology and Religious Studies Student Association, STRSSA. Membership in STRSSA is automatic with a students' enrollment in the School of Theology and Religious Studies. STRSSA activities are directed by an annually elected board, composed of officers and representatives from each academic area. The prime function of the School of Theology and Religious Studies Students Association is representation. STRSSA names voting student representatives to the school's and the degree program committees, to the Graduate Students Association Board and to the student board of the Washington Theological Consortium. STRSSA board members attend program and school faculty meetings, acting as liaison between students and faculty, giving student reports, advice, suggestions and perspective, but do not hold voting rights at the faculty meetings. STRSSA also administers and publishes a faculty-course evaluation each semester and provides a number of other services, such as common prayer times, an annual speaker series, socials and centralized information of interest to theology students.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

For a complete list of graduate course offerings, go to the School website: http://trs.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm

 

Footnotes