The Catholic University of America

School of Engineering

Officers of Instruction

Faculty

Charles C. Nguyen, D.Sc.
Dean and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Frank A. Andrews, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Mohammad Arozullah, Ph.D.
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
H. Bulent Atabek, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
J. Steven Brown, Ph.D., P.E.
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Mario J. Casarella, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Lin-Ching Chang, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Paul K. Chang, Dr.Ing., D.Sc.
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Andrew G. Favret, D.Engr.
Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Rene D. Gabbai, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Edward D. Jordan, Ph.D., P.E.
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
John A. Judge, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Timothy W. Kao, Ph.D., P.E.
Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
William J. Kelnhofer, D.Engr.
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Ozlem Kilic, D.Sc.
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Poul V. Lade, Ph.D.
Professor of Civil Engineering
Sung Ching Ling, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Biomedical Engineering
Gunnar Lucko, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering
Peter Lum, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Arash Massoudieh, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering
Scott Mathews, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
George Mavroeidis, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering
John J. McCoy, Sc.D.
Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
George E. McDuffie, Ph.D., P.E.
Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Robert Meister, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Nader M. Namazi, Ph.D.
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Tobias Nef, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Sen Nieh, Ph.D.
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Hsien Ping Pao, Ph.D.
Professor of Emeritus Civil Engineering
Jessica Ramella-Roman, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Phillip A. Regalia, Ph.D.
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Michael C. Soteriades. D.Sc., P.E.
Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
Lu Sun, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Civil Engineering
Binh Q. Tran, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Joseph Vignola, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Baohong Yuan, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Zhaoyang Wang, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Yun Chow Whang, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Mechanical Engineering
Otto C. Wilson, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Associates of the Faculty

Abdella Battou, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Joseph M. Bishop, Ph.D. Lecturer in Civil Engineering
John Bonita, Ph.D., P.E.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
David Brennan, M.S.B.E.
Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering
Charles E. Campbell Jr., Ph.D.
Lecturer in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Isaac Chang, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Jim Christ, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Carl T. Demarco, Ph.D., JD Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering
Jeffrey R. Didion, M.S.M.E.
Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
Joseph Findaro, J.D.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Saryn Goldberg, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor in Biomedical Engineering
Jeffrey A. Gorman, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
James W. Hudson, B.S.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Philip Clark Jones, J.D.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
William A. Joyce, P.E. Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Gideon Kantor, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering
William LaPlante, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
S. Samuel Lin, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Francis Linehan, M.E.E.
Lecturer in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Charles C. Liu, Ph.D., P.E.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Civil Engineering
George Mattingly, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Mechanical Engineering
John McTyre, M.S.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Tuan Nguyen, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
Uyen Nguyen, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering
Ken O'Connell, Ph.D., P.E.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Neil Palumbo, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Mark Pettinato, M.S.
Lecturer in Biomedical Engineering
Long Phan, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Lawrence Schuette, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Wilfred Shields, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering
Steven Stanhope, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering
Steve Sullivan Lecturer in Civil Engineering
Sivakumar Tadikonda, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
David Yashar, Ph.D.
Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering

Biomedical Engineering Advisory Council

Biomedical Engineering Advisory Council

Edward B. Healton, M.D., M.P.H.
Medical Director, National Rehabilitation Hospital, Washington, D.C.
Isaac Chang, Ph.D. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Md
Corinna Lathan, Ph.D.
President, Anthrotronix Inc., Silver Spring, Md.
Seong K. Mun, Ph.D. Institute of Advanced Study, Alexandria, Va.
Michael J. Rosen, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vt.
Artin Shoukas, Ph.D.
Professor, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Md.
Steve Stanhope, Ph.D.
Dean, College of Health Sciences and Professor of Health Nutrition & Exercise Sciences, Univ. of Delaware
Aydin Tozeren, Ph.D.
Professor, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pa.

Civil Engineering Advisory Council

Albert Grant, B.C.E.
Consulting Engineer, Potomac, Md.
Timothy W. Kao, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Civil Engineering
Melissa L. Prelewicz, M.S.C.E.
Manager, Professional and Technical Activities, American Society of Civil Engineers, Reston, Va.
Larry Moore, P.E. Director of Engineering, Clark Concrete Contractors, LLC, Bethesda, MD
William J. Murphy, P.E.
Principal, Schnabel Engineering North, Leesburg, Va.
Dennis McCahill, Ph.D.
Construction Consultant, Annapolis, Md.
Steven Smith, Ph.D., P.E. Principal Engineer and Group Manager, CTL Group, Columbia, MD
Mark J. Tamaro, P.E. Vice President, Thornton Tomasetti, Washington, DC
Richard L. Vogel Senior Vice President, The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company, Bethesda, MD
Tony Warner, M.S.C.E.
President, Warner Construction Consultants, Inc., Rockville, Md.
Gregory Welter, M.S.C.E.
Senior Project Engineer, O'Brien & Gere Engineers Inc., Landover, Md.
James A. Wilding, B.C.E.
President Emeritus, Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority, Washington, D.C.

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Advisory Council

Neil Birch, Ph.D.
President, Birch Associates, Potomac, Md.
Thomas E. Bordley, Sc.D.
Chief Scientist, General Dynamics Advanced Technology Systems, Washington, D.C.
Fahmida Chowdhury
Program Director, Division of Graduate Education, National Science Foundation, Arlington, Va.
Henry Dardy, Ph.D.
Chief Scientist, Center for Computational Science, Naval Research Lab, Washington, D.C.
Per Kullstam, Ph.D.
Paircom, Inc., Springfield, Va.
Seong Mun, Ph.D.
Director, Imaging Science and Info Systems Center, Washington, D.C.
Ronald Waynant, Ph.D.
Senior Optical Engineering, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, FDA, Rockville, Md.
Michael J. Smith
Director, Edgewood Chemical Biological Defense Operations, ITT Industries, Advanced Engineering and Science Division, Abingdon, Md.
Ananthram Swami, Ph.D.
Army Research Laboratory, Adelphi, Md.

Mechanical Engineering Advisory Council

Richard Dame, Ph.D.
President, Mega Engineering, Silver Spring, Md.
Charles "Skip" Derick
GSA Services Schedules, General Dynamics Information Technology, Fairfax, Va.
David Didion, Ph.D
Retired NIST Fellow, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Port Republic, Md.
Stan Halperson
Executive Committee Member,ASME, Washington, D.C.
Don Marlowe
Standards Administrator (Retired), Science and Health Communication, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Rockville, Md.
Jaclyn A. Schade
Registered Patent Agent, Pillsbury Winthrop Shaw Pittman LLP, McLean, Va.
Karlena Schwing
Law Clerk, Chambers of Chief Judge Gierke, U.S. Courts,Washington, D.C.
Vincent Sica
Vice President of Special Programs, Lockheed Martin Technical Operations, Fairfax, Va.
Owen G. Thorp III, Ph.D.
Captain, USNR, Permanent Military Professor, Weapons and Systems Engineering, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md.

History

The engineering program was established in 1896, soon after the founding of The Catholic University of America. The School of Engineering was formally established as a separate school in 1930 and was shortly thereafter renamed as the School of Engineering and Architecture. In 1992, the School of Engineering and Architecture separated into the School of Engineering and the School of Architecture and Planning. Prior to 1950, the primary focus of the school was on undergraduate professional programs, although there have always been graduate programs offered. However, research activity and graduate professional offerings have increased at a steady rate since 1950. Today the engineering school offers bachelor's, master's, and doctoral degrees in five academic programs, as well as a master's degree in engineering management.

Mission

Historically, the engineering profession has placed great emphasis on technical expertise as a criterion for recognition and advancement. However, even the most thoroughly trained technical professional must be able to contribute something more to society with corresponding opportunities and obligations. As such, the environment in which the training of an individual takes place has an effect upon the individual's later professional practice. If the environment were to be neutral on the issues of faith and morals, the education would be narrowly superficial. Engineering education in a Catholic environment instills in students a sense of morality and ethics by presenting to them the logic and rationale of a systematic set of values for social and ethical responsibility. This, in fact, is a distinctive trait of engineering education at The Catholic University of America.

The Catholic University of America's School of Engineering provides a personalized learning and research environment in which faculty, staff, and students achieve excellence in research, education, and service. It emphasizes research and scholarship of the highest possible caliber and provides personalized instruction at both the graduate and undergraduate levels.

Goals

The goals of the School of Engineering of The Catholic University of America are to be a leader in undergraduate Catholic engineering education; to have nationally recognized student-oriented, research-based graduate programs; and to offer innovative professional master's programs that serve the metropolitan Washington area and complement and enhance the undergraduate and research-based graduate programs. The School of Engineering is dedicated to educating future engineering leaders. All graduates are prepared to enter and continue the practice of engineering, to begin graduate work in engineering, or to enter other professions such as business, law, and medicine.

Specifically, the goals of the School of Engineering are:

  1. To achieve research pre-eminence in a number of specific areas of engineering and applied science.
  2. To provide a unique educational experience to its undergraduate students so that they achieve superior technical competence while bringing moral and ethical values and leadership qualities to their chosen careers.
  3. To provide signal service to contemporary society by offering high-quality graduate and professional programs to part-time working students.
  4. To contribute to the Centers of Excellence and the liberal arts core curriculum of the university through its research and education programs.

Each program's curriculum ensures that graduates have an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering; to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data; to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs; to function on multi-disciplinary teams; to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems; to understand professional and ethical responsibility; to communicate effectively; to understand the need for, and to engage in, lifelong learning; and to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. The school works closely with the departments in assessment and improvement of the various programs. School-level efforts are focused on the core or common part of the curricula, in particular, providing a vehicle for working with departments and schools outside of engineering on curriculum development and improvement. Student surveys and evaluation of various data collected by and maintained by the school and the Center for Planning and Information Technology are used as appropriate in improvement efforts. The dean's office also coordinates improvement efforts with other offices on campus such as the career services, enrollment management, vice provost for undergraduate studies, and the registrar. Technology can play an important role in solving many of the problems facing humankind. The engineer of tomorrow will have the responsibility to engineer in a socially conscious way. The engineering programs of The Catholic University of America permit maximum flexibility to pursue courses of study that reflect balance between technology and social awareness.

Undergraduate Curricula and Academic Regulations

Degree Programs

The School of Engineering offers programs leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Biomedical Engineering, Bachelor of Civil Engineering, Bachelor of Electrical Engineering, Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering and Bachelor of Science in Computer Science. The undergraduate programs in biomedical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering are accredited by ABET.

Academic Advising

Once admitted to the School of Engineering, each student is assigned an academic adviser, usually a full-time faculty member. Normally, students remain with their advisers for the duration of their studies. Students are required to consult with their advisers at least once a semester, but can see their adviser at any time during the academic year. Students must obtain approval from their advisers for registration and to make any course changes, such as add/drop. The dean advises general (undecided) engineering students. Ordinarily, at the end of the first year in residence, an undecided student will be asked to designate the program in which he or she wishes to earn a degree, if he or she has not already done so. A student will consult with the dean and the chair of the designated program and, once accepted, will be reassigned to an adviser from the designated program.

Transfer Students

Historically, many junior and senior engineering students have transferred to the school from community colleges and four-year liberal arts colleges. Experience with these students indicates that they have no difficulty in maintaining academic performances similar to what they obtained in their previous schools. Students who have completed pre-engineering programs may normally begin the junior year of studies during their first semesters. Students who wish to transfer to the school are advised to contact the appropriate department to determine which of their previous courses are transferable. The school has policies governing the acceptance of transfer students.

Transfer Credits

With approval from the dean, students can take courses at nonconsortium institutions and transfer these credits to the school, within limits set by the university. The school has a rigorous procedure to evaluate courses for equivalency taken by transfer students and courses to be taken at nonconsortium institutions. The dean must approve all transfer credits.

Internships

The school believes that students can benefit from academic year and summer internships, which provide opportunities for students to learn while doing actual engineering work. The Career Services Office and the school assist students in obtaining internships. The construction concentration in civil engineering has an internship as an integral part of its program. The program in biomedical engineering has a long history of placing students in internships with hospitals and research laboratories in the Washington, D.C., area and is expanding its industrial internship opportunities. The electrical engineering and computer science programs have summer internship and co-op programs with the Naval Research Laboratories. The mechanical engineering program strongly encourages its students to pursue internship opportunities.

Interdisciplinary Studies

Students may elect to pursue an interdisciplinary course of study in dual degree programs leading to an engineering or a computer science degree and a degree in an academic concentration in the School of Arts and Sciences. Interested students should contact the dean's office for more information. In addition, a program leading to the dual degrees of Bachelor of Science in Architecture, offered by the School of Architecture and Planning, and Bachelor of Civil Engineering is available to students who want to combine the practice of architecture and engineering. Interested students should contact either the School of Architecture and Planning or the Department of Civil Engineering for specific information.

Minors

A minor, or subconcentration, in the humanities, social sciences, philosophy or religious studies is available to students who complete the requirements for the subconcentration as stipulated by the respective department or school. Normally, a subconcentration consists of six or seven courses in one disciplinary area. Applications for the minor are available in the Office of the Dean of the School of Engineering. Engineering students can also obtain a minor in computer science. Students should check with their departments for specific requirements for the minor. Completed applications must be submitted to the Office of the Dean of the School of Engineering.

Accelerated Joint Bachelor's/Master's Degree Programs

An accelerated bachelor's/master's program allows undergraduate students to pursue a bachelor's degree and a master's degree in a shorter time than would be required if both degrees were pursued separately. This is made possible by allowing a number of approved graduate engineering courses (500 level or greater) taken as part of the requirements for the bachelor's degree to be applied toward the master's degree. Contact the dean's office for additional information regarding admission requirements and the application process.

Study Abroad Program

The School of Engineering has established a student exchange program with various universities abroad. Through the established student exchange program, qualified engineering students at CUA may study abroad during the second semester of their junior year. The CUA engineering undergraduate programs have developed modified curricula for their study abroad students to ensure that the participating students graduate on time. Students who are interested in this program should contact the dean's office for general information and their department for specific coursework. To be eligible to participate in the study abroad program, students must be in good standing and possess a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.00 at the end of their sophomore year. For more information please see the School of Engineering Web site at: http://engineering.cua.edu

English Requirement

All students are required to take at least one English writing course, normally ENG 101, Rhetoric and Composition. The particular course depends on placement at the time of matriculation.

Mathematics Requirement

All incoming freshmen are required to take a math placement exam. Students with insufficient scores will be required to take remedial math courses, for example, MATH 120-Elementary Functions, before taking MATH 121-Calculus I. Remedial math courses do not count toward the degree requirements. The study of mathematics is integral to engineering such that special requirements are imposed. In particular, an engineering student may not advance to the sophomore level in mathematics without a minimum grade point average of 1.50 in the freshman year mathematics courses. A minimum grade point average of 1.75 is required in the freshman and sophomore mathematics courses as a prerequisite for admission to upper-division engineering courses.

GPA Requirement for Graduation

Students must have a minimum cumulative average of 2.0 in the course of studies required for the degree program to graduate.

A student whose cumulative GPA is less than 2.0 is on academic probation for the following regular semester. In other words, a student whose cumulative GPA is below 2.0 at the end of the spring semester, is on probation through the end of the following fall semester, even if the student takes Summer Session courses to raise his/her cumulative GPA. Also a student whose cumulative GPA is below 2.0 at the end of the fall semester is on probation through the end of the following spring semester. While on probation, a student may register for no more than four courses and may not participate in extra-curricular activities such as student government or athletics. A student may be dismissed for the following reasons: failure to gain a 2.0 cumulative GPA after two consecutive semesters on academic probation; failure in three courses in any given semester; and if at the end of any academic year, a cumulative GPA of less than 1.5.

General Degree

Although the minimum number of courses required for an engineering degree is 40 credit-bearing courses, specific programs may require a somewhat larger total. In general, the curricula of the various programs are similar in the first two years and students can transfer easily between programs during this period. The coursework during the last two years is discipline specific and can be tailored to meet the student's interests. The general requirements for the degree consist of four main areas: math and science components, liberal study component, general engineering component, and discipline-specific technical component.

Math and Science Component (ten courses). The math and science components for the majority of the engineering programs consist of five mathematics courses and five science courses, including laboratories.

Liberal Study Component (nine courses). The liberal study component emphasizes the religious, economical, historical, and philosophical aspects of modern civilization. It complements the technical component and illustrates that technology is one segment of culture and learning. It consists of three religion courses, one engineering ethics course, one English composition course, and four additional liberal study courses. The requirement of the religion courses is consistent with CUA's mission and goals, while the engineering ethics course provides opportunities for students to increase their understanding of professional and ethical responsibilities. The English composition course emphasizes the need for all engineers to communicate effectively. The four additional liberal studies courses must be selected in consultation with the student's adviser from a list of approved courses. These liberal study courses provide exposure to the broad range of studies necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global and societal context and provide knowledge of contemporary issues relevant to engineering practice.

General Engineering Component (nine courses). The general engineering component is common to most disciplines. It consists of seven fixed courses in engineering design, laboratory, CAD, computer programming, engineering mechanics, electrical networks and electronics, and two discipline-relevant courses selected from a set of four engineering courses.

Engineering Common Component

ENGR 102

Introduction to Engineering Design and Professionalism

ENGR 104

Introduction to Engineering Laboratory

ENGR 106

Computer-Aided Engineering Tools

CSC 113

Computer Programming

ENGR 201

Engineering Mechanics I

ENGR 212

Electrical Networks

ENGR 321

Electronic Circuits I (all majors except CE[1])


A selection of two courses from the following set:

ENGR 202

Engineering Mechanics II (EE[2], ME)

ENGR 211

Thermodynamics (BE, CE, EE, ME)

ENGR 301

Solid Mechanics (CE, ME)

ENGR 331

Fluid Mechanics (BE, CE, ME)

Discipline-Specific Technical Component. The discipline-specific technical component consists of at least 12 courses and program electives covering topics relevant to a particular discipline.

Standard First-Year Engineering Program

The normal program for engineering students in the first year is presented below. Students with advanced placement and interdisciplinary programs may alter this program in consultation with their advisers.

First-Year Program

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

MATH 121

Calculus I

4

-

MATH 122

Calculus II

-

4

CHEM 107

General Chemistry

3

-

CHEM 113

General Chemistry Lab

2

-

ENG 101

Rhetoric and Composition

-

3

ENGR 102

Introduction to Engineering Design and Professionalism

3

-

ENGR 104

Introduction to Engineering Laboratory

1

-

ENGR 106

Computer-Aided Engineering Tools

-

2

Electives

Liberal Studies or Additional Technical Courses[3]

3(4)

3

PHYS 215

University Physics[4]

-

4

 

Total

16(17)

16

Department of Biomedical Engineering

Professor Emeritus

H.T. Atabek, Sung Ching Ling

Associate Professors

Peter Lum; Binh Tran, Chair, Otto Wilson, Jr.

Adjunct Associate Professors

Steven Stanhope

Assistant Professors

Tobias Nef; Jessica Ramella-Roman; Baohong Yuan

Lecturers

David Brennan;Carl DeMarco; Patrick Mehl; Mark Pettinato; Uyen Nguyen

Mission of the Department

The mission of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at CUA is to educate men and women who can bridge engineering with life sciences in the service of human health and represent the biomedical engineering profession with distinction. Our department serves as a conduit for better understanding of biology through engineering concepts and for utilizing the complex organization of life systems in developing new technologies. The department emphasizes integrative bioengineering and regards the humanities an integral part of undergraduate education.

Undergraduate Program

The Department of Biomedical Engineering offers an undergraduate degree program leading to the Bachelor of Biomedical Engineering.

Biomedical engineers solve problems in medicine or biology by applying the principles and tools of modern engineering. The undergraduate program provides a broad scientific and technical background in engineering, establishing the foundation for lifelong learning on newly emerging health care technologies.

The accredited degree program is designed to prepare the student for a professional career in biomedical engineering or to enter graduate or medical school. The premedical track satisfies the entrance requirements of most medical schools in the United States. Qualified students are encouraged to complete a master's degree through a fifth year of full-time study, with their fourth and fifth years coordinated to accommodate various interests and career objectives.

Unique features of the CUA undergraduate program include a strong internship program through partnerships with federal biomedical laboratories, industry, and local hospitals; our unique Washington location (six hospitals within one mile of campus, and a metropolitan area possessing the richest biomedical research environment in the world); the benefits of personalized education and training that come with a smaller academic environment; and well-funded initiatives in biomaterials, biomedical instrumentation, medical imaging and bio-optics, rehabilitation engineering, home care technologies, and tele-medicine provide a nurturing environment for designing and evaluating innovative technologies for addressing real-world health care problems.

Standard Program

First Year

In addition to the standard first-year engineering program all biomedical engineering majors are required to take Biology 105, Chemistry 108 and BE 491 (Seminar Biomedical Engineering).

Second Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

BE 491

Seminar: Biomedical Engineering

0

0

ENGR 201

Engineering Mechanics

3

-

BE 202

Biomechanics

-

3

ENGR 212

Electrical Networks

-

3

ENGR 222

Engineering Mathematics I

-

4

PHYS 216

University Physics II

4

-

CSC 113

Computer Programming I

3

-

MATH 221

Calculus III

4

-

ENGR 211

Thermodynamics

-

3

 

Liberal Studies Elective

3

3

 

Total

17[5]

16[5]

Third Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

BE 491

Seminar: Biomedical Engineering

0

0

BE 398

Biomechanical Design

3

-

BE 315

Intro Biomedical Systems Analysis

-

3

MATH 309

Probability & Statistics for Engineers

3

-

ENGR 321

Electronic Circuits

3

-

ENGR 331

Fluid Mechanics

3

-

ENGR 355

Electrical Laboratory I

1

-

BIOL 518

Physiology

-

4

BE 513

Biomedical Instrumentation

-

3

PHIL 362

Professional Ethics in Engineering

-

3

 

Liberal Studies Electives

3

3

 

Total

16

16

Fourth Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

BE 497

BMED Senior Design

3

-

BE 494

BMED Senior Project Lab

-

3

BE 501

Biomaterials

3

-

ENGR 503

Control Systems

3

-

ENGR 401

Senior Seminar

1

-

 

Program Electives

3

6

 

Liberal Studies Electives

3

6

 

Total

16

15

Educational Objectives of the Undergraduate Program

  1. To prepare graduates for a career in biomedical engineering or a related field (e.g. other engineering disciplines, medicine, law, etc.) and to provide them the necessary skills to obtain leadership positions.
  2. To prepare graduates to use modern engineering tools for practice and/or pursuit of advanced degrees.
  3. To instill in graduates the importance of lifelong learning in a rapidly changing global economy.

Department of Civil Engineering

Professors

Poul V. Lade

Professors Emeriti

John H. Baltrukonis; Timothy W. Kao; Dennis McCahill; John J. McCoy; Hsien Ping Pao; Michael C. Soteriades

Associate Professors

Lu Sun, Chair

Adjunct Associate Professor

Charles C. Liu

Assistant Professor

Gunnar Lucko; George Mavroeidis;Arash Massoudieh

Lecturers

Joseph Bishop; John Bonita; Joseph Findaro; James W. Hudson; Philip Clark Jones; William A, Joyce; S. Samuel Lin; Long Phan; John McTyre; Ken O'Connell; Steve Sullivan

Mission of the Department

The mission of the Department of Civil Engineering is to provide a balanced education to students, strong in the scientific, engineering, humanistic, and social bases, so that they may attain a leadership role in their profession and "use their knowledge and skill for the enhancement of human welfare and the environment." (Code of Ethics, American Society of Civil Engineers.)

Undergraduate Program

The undergraduate professional program in civil engineering leads to the Bachelor of Civil Engineering degree. It includes study in structures, environmental engineering, geotechnical and systems engineering, and construction, aimed at helping the graduate to pursue a career in civil engineering or to pursue graduate studies. Sufficient electives are available in the program to allow a greater concentration in one of these areas or to elect technical courses in other areas. Through selected course offerings, civil engineering students can also choose to concentrate in construction engineering or in environmental engineering.

The Department of Civil Engineering, in conjunction with the School of Architecture and Planning, offers dual degrees in civil engineering and architecture. Interested students should contact either the department or the school for specific information.

Standard Program (Structural/Geotechnical)

First Year

See standard first-year engineering program in the general engineering section.

Second Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

ENGR 202

Engineering Mechanics II

-

3

ENGR 211

Thermodynamics

-

3

ENGR 212

Electric Networks

-

3

ENGR 222

Engineering Mathematics I

-

4

ENGR 301

Mechanics of Solids

3

-

CSC 113

Computer Program C++

3

-

MATH 221

Calculus III

4

-

PHYS 216

University Physics II

4

-

 

Liberal Studies Electives

3

3

 

Total

17

16

Third Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

CE 302

Civil Engineering Systems Mgmt

-

4

CE 312

Theory of Structures

3

-

CE 366

Soil Mechanics

3

-

CE 367

Soil Testing for Engineers

-

2

CE 372

Engineering Hydraulics

-

3

CE 402

Structural Steel Design

-

3

MATH 309

Probability & Statistics for Engineers

3

-

ENGR 331

Fluid Mechanics

3

-

CHEM 395

Engineering Materials

2

-

ENGR 395

Engineering Materials Lab

1

-

ENGR 538

Intro. Environmental Engineering

-

3

 

Liberal Studies Elective

3

3

 

Total

18

18

Fourth Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

CE 374

Introduction to Transportation Systems and Design

3

-

CE 400

Seminar on Public Policy

-

1

CE 403

Reinforced Concrete Design

3

-

CE 468

Foundation Engineering

3

-

CE 520

Design of Structural Systems

-

3

 

Program Electives

3

3

CE 590 Construct Operational Analysis   3
CE 593 Applied Hydrology   3

 

Liberal Studies Elective

3

3

ENGR 401

SeniorSeminar

1

-

PHIL 362

Professional Ethics in Engineering

-

3

 

Total

16

16

Educational Objectives of the Undergraduate Program

  1. To provide graduates with a scientific and technical foundation for a career in civil engineering or related fields, in which they can identify, formulate, analyze, and solve engineering problems.
  2. To provide graduates with modern engineering tools for professional practice and leadership, and/or for pursuit of graduate studies, and to instill in them the importance of lifelong learning.
  3. To provide graduates with an understanding of moral and ethical values as well as an understanding of environmental stewardship in the global/societal context.

Standard Program

For construction concentrators. One program elective is replaced by CE 110, Computers in Construction (3); CE 301, Construction Administration and Systems (4). Other adjustments are made with respect to liberal studies requirements and program electives as necessary. An alternative elective in environmental engineering may be substituted for ENGR 538 only if specifically approved by the faculty adviser

For environmental engineering concentrators. CE 542, (CHEM 542) Environmental Chemistry Laboratory (3) is a required course in lieu of ENGR 395 and CHEM 395. CHEM 317 Principles of Environmental Science (3) is a required course to be taken in the sophomore year. BIOL 105 Mechanisms of Life I with Lab (4) is required in lieu of a program elective. Other adjustments are made with respect to program electives.

For the capstone design. students must take CE 520, Design of Structural Systems (3). This course gives students a major design experience in their senior year.

Recommended Program Electives

CE 504 Stress - Strain Behavior of Soils

[6]CE 514

Advanced Vibrations and Structural Dynamics

CE 516

Prestressed Concrete

CE 524

Matrix and Computer Methods in Structural Analysis

CE 555

Environmental Law and Policy

CE 560

Case Study in Geotechnical and Geo-environmental Engineering

CE 562 Seepage and Slope Stability

CE 570

Innovative Infrastructure Management

CE 571

Pavement Theory and Design

CE 572

Intelligent Transportation Systems

CE 573

Traffic Engineering and Flow Theory

CE 575

Introduction to Systems Analysis

CE 579

Harbors and Coastal Engineering

CE 581

Practical Construction Law

CE 582

Value Engineering

CE 587

Estimating and Bidding

CE 588

Construction Operational Management

CE 589

Construction Scheduling

CE 591

Engineering Hydrogeology and Groundwater Flow

CE 595

Water Supply Engineering

CE 596

Waste Treatment Engineering

Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Professors

Mohammad Arozullah; Nader Namazi; Phillip A. Regalia, Chair

Professors Emeriti

Andrew G. Favret; George E. McDuffie; Robert Meister

Associate Professor

Scott Mathews

Assistant Professors

Farid Ahmed; Lin-Ching Chang; Jae Choi; Ozlem Kilic

Lecturers

Ravindra Athaleh; Gregory Behrman; Kiran Butani;Charles Campbell Jr.; Vincent Cassella; Ajaz Ejaz; Francis Linehan; Edward Moses; Lawrence Schuette; Saiid Ganjalizadeh; Steven Weiss; David Tremper; Robert Schell; David Vargas; Elsayed Mansour

Mission of the Department

The mission of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science is to educate men and women in the disciplines of electrical engineering and computer science in order to prepare them professionally so that they can contribute and service the needs of society with a commitment founded on moral and ethical principles.

Electrical Engineering Program

In the rapidly changing field of electrical engineering and computer science, it is of utmost importance to provide the student with a broad-based program of fundamentals. This type of education leads to an understanding of current facets of electrical engineering and computer science and also provides a basis for contribution to future electrical and computer science needs of society. The Electrical Engineering Program offers the Bachelor of Electrical Engineering degree. The Electrical Engineering curriculum consists of a core of required and elective subjects, allowing students to prepare themselves for either an industrial career of future studies at the graduate level. To accomplish this, a balance is maintained between the broad-based fundamentals and applications. A design emphasis runs throughout the program and culminates in the senior year in a major design project.

Bachelor of Electrical Engineering Standard Program

First Year

See standard first-year engineering program in the general engineering section.

Second Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

CSC 113

Computer Programming C++

3

-

ENGR 201

Engineering Mechanics I

3

-

ENGR 202

Engineering Mechanics II

-

3

ENGR 211

Thermodynamics

-

3

ENGR 212

Electric Networks

-

3

ENGR 222

Engineering Mathematics I

-

4

MATH 221

Calculus III

4

-

PHYS 216

University Physics II

4

-

PHIL 362 Professional Ethics - 3

 

Liberal Studies Electives

3

-

 

Total

17

16

Third Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

ENGR 309

Engineering Math II

3

-

ENGR 321

Electronic Circuits I

3

-

ENGR 355

Electrical Laboratory I

1

-

EE 311

Signals and Systems

3

-

EE 312 Microprocessors - 3
EE 321 Electronic Circuits I   3

EE 322

Electronic Circuits II

-

3

EE 326

Switching Circuits and Logic Design

3

-

EE 342

Electromagnetic Fields and Waves I

-

3

EE 356

Electrical Laboratory II

-

2

EE 357 Electrical Laboratory III - 1

EE 362

Analog and Digital Signal Processing

-

3

 

Liberal Studies Electives

3

-

 

Total

16

17

Fourth Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

EE 422

Mixed Signal

3

-

EE 413

Communication Systems

3

-

ENGR 503

Control Systems

3

-

 

Program Elective

-

6

EE 491, 492

Engineering Practice and Design I, II

2

3

 

Liberal Studies Elective

3

6

ENGR 401

Senior Seminar

1

-

EE 561 Random Signal Theory   3

 

Total

17

18

Recommended Program Electives

New courses are frequently added. For this reason students should consult their adviser regarding the department's recommendations and approval of each semester's program electives.

EE 501

Communication & Computer Network Simulation

EE 502

Optical Systems and Devices

EE 504

Introduction to Fourier Optics

EE 515

Digital Signal Processing

EE 522

Linear System Analysis

EE 531

Data Communications Networks

EE 540

Microwave Antenna and Design

EE 541

Electromagnetic Theory

EE 542

Antennas & Propagation for Wireless Communications

EE 543

Remote Sensing

EE 544

Introduction to Bioelectromagnetics

EE 546

Electrical Properties of Materials

EE 550

Semiconductor Optoelectronics - Materials and Devices

EE 572

Basics of Information Coding and Transmission

PHYS 506

Introduction to Modern Physics

PHYS 528

Optics

PHYS 531

Introduction to Quantum Theory

PHYS 532

Introduction to Atomic and Molecular Theory

Educational Objectives of the Electrical Engineering Program

The educational objectives of the Electrical Engineering Program are:

  1. To provide our students with a solid foundation in mathematics, science, and engineering combined with a strong liberal arts component through a stimulating and supporting learning environment;
  2. To instill in our students a sense of morality, ethics, and professionalism;
  3. To prepare our students to enter the practice of electrical engineering and/or to pursue graduate studies;
  4. To enable our students to effectively treat complex electrical/electronic systems and signals in terms of modeling, simulation, experimentation, interpretation, and analysis of data, and design of a process to produce desired outputs;
  5. To enable our students to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems through the use of analytical techniques, proven design practices, and modern engineering tools;
  6. To enable our students to become productive interdisciplinary team members and effective communicators;
  7. To enable our students to understand the global impact of engineering solutions, to gain knowledge of contemporary issues, and to develop skills for continued learning by the exposure to a broad education.

Computer Science Program

The Computer Science Program, offering a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, is designed to prepare graduates for supporting roles in the computer science profession. The core areas of this program include operating systems, architecture, information processing, programming languages, theory of computing and applications, and software engineering. Many computer science electives are available to broaden the student's perspective in this field. Completion of this program also prepares the graduate for further graduate studies. Areas of special interest include data and communication network, multimedia processing, bioinformatics, information assurance, and intelligent information systems. The department aslo offers a computer science minor, tailoring to students from other majors seeking to expand their command of information technologies.

The setting for this education is in a modern computer environment. The concentration of in-course studies, combined with laboratory studies, enhances the abilities of the students. Other school programs including electrical, civil, biomedical, and mechanical engineering offer a broad range of courses to computer science students, as additional program electives for students with special interests.

Bachelor of Science in Computer Science Standard Program

First Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

CSC 123,124

Computer Science I, II

3

3

ENG 101

Rhetoric/Composition

-

3

MATH 121,122

Calculus I, II

4

4

PHYS 205,206

College Physics I, II

4

4

 

Liberal Studies Electives

3

-

 

Total

14

14

Second Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

CSC 113

Computational Methods & Engineering

3

-

CSC 280

Data Structures

3

-

CSC 326 Switching 3  

CSC 390

Computer Organization

-

3

CSC 312

Theory of Computing

-

3

CSC 370

Programming Languages

-

3

ENGR 222

Engineering Math I

-

4

 

Liberal Studies Electives

6

3

 

Total

15

16

Third Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

CSC 323

Computer Networks

3

-

CSC 363

Software Development

3

-

MATH 114

Probability and Statistics

3

-

CSC 442

Database Management

3

-

CSC 306

Operating Systems

-

3

CSC 311

Design and Analysis of Algorithms

-

3

CSC 380 Numerical Analysis & Optimization - 3

 

Science/Engineering Elective

-

3

 

Liberal Studies Electives

3

3

 

Total

15

18

Fourth Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

CSC 491, 492

Senior Design

2

3

CSC 412 Microprocessor Programming & Design - 3

ENGR 401

SeniorSeminar

1

-

 

Science/Engineering

3

-

 

CSC/Liberal Studies Free Electives

-

3

 

CSC Electives

6

3

 

Liberal Studies Electives

3

3

 

Total

15

15

 

Bachelor of Electrical Engineering Alternative Energy Track

First Year

See standard first-year engineering program in the general engineering section.

Second Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

CSC 113

Computer Programming C++

3

-

ENGR 201

Engineering Mechanics I

3

-

ENGR 202

Engineering Mechanics II

-

3

ENGR 211

Thermodynamics

-

3

ENGR 212

Electric Networks

-

3

ENGR 222

Engineering Mathematics I

-

4

MATH 221

Calculus III

4

-

PHYS 216

University Physics II

4

-

PHIL 362 Professional Ethics - 3

 

Liberal Studies Electives

3

-

 

Total

17

16

Third Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

MATH 309

Engineering Math II

3

-

ENGR 321

Electronic Circuits I

3

-

ENGR 355

Electrical Laboratory I

1

-

EE 311

Signals and Systems

3

-

EE 312 Microprocessors - 3
EE 313 Intro to Alternative Energy 3  

EE 322

Electronic Circuits II

-

3

EE 326

Switching Circuits and Logic Design

3

-

EE 342

Electromagnetic Fields and Waves I

-

3

EE 356

Electrical Laboratory II

-

2

EE 358 Applications of Photovoltaics - 3

PHYS 359

Theory of Photovoltaics

-

3

 

Total

16

17

Fourth Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

EE 422

Mixed Signal

3

-

EE 407 Power Systems & Grids 3  

EE 413

Communication Systems

3

-

ENGR 503

Control Systems

3

-

 

Program Elective

-

6

EE 491, 492

Engineering Practice and Design I, II

2

3

 

Liberal Studies Elective

3

6

ENGR 401

Senior Seminar

1

-

EE 561 Random Signal Theory   3
ME 505 Hybrid Gas-Electric Vehicles   3
CHEM 423 Batteries, Fuel Cells & Energy Storage   3

 

Total

17

18

Recommended Program Electives

New courses are frequently added. For this reason students should consult their adviser regarding the department's recommendations and approval of each semester's program electives.

EE 501

Communication & Computer Network Simulation

EE 502

Optical Systems and Devices

EE 504

Introduction to Fourier Optics

EE 515

Digital Signal Processing

EE 522

Linear System Analysis

EE 531

Data Communications Networks

EE 540

Microwave Antenna and Design

EE 541

Electromagnetic Theory

EE 542

Antennas & Propagation for Wireless Communications

EE 543

Remote Sensing

EE 544

Introduction to Bioelectromagnetics

EE 546

Electrical Properties of Materials

EE 550

Semiconductor Optoelectronics - Materials and Devices

EE 572

Basics of Information Coding and Transmission

PHYS 506

Introduction to Modern Physics

PHYS 528

Optics

PHYS 531

Introduction to Quantum Theory

PHYS 532

Introduction to Atomic and Molecular Theory

 

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Professor

Sen Nieh, Chair

Associate Professor

J. Steven Brown

Professors Emeriti

Frank A. Andrews; H. Bulent Atabek; Mario Casarella; Edward D. Jordan; William J. Kelnhofer; Yun Chow Whang

Assistant Professors

Rene D. Gabbai; John A. Judge; Joseph Vignola; Zhaoyang Wang

Lecturers

Jeffrey Didion; William LaPlante; Tuan Nguyen; Wilfred Shields

Mission of the Department

The mission of the Department of Mechanical Engineering is to develop professional engineers with strong technical expertise rooted in a liberal arts tradition, by nurturing a high-quality learning and research environment.

Mechanical Engineering Standard Program

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers undergraduate degree programs leading to the degree Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering. Mechanical engineering includes such activities as the design and control of systems and components for heating and power generation, aircraft and motored vehicles, refrigeration and air conditioning, environmental protection, and computers and robotics. The undergraduate program provides a broad scientific and technical background in engineering, establishing the foundation for lifelong learning in newly emerging technologies. Computer software is continuously integrated in the design, analysis, and laboratory phases of the curriculum. Flexibility exists in the selection of upper-level technical courses to accommodate the students' interests and diverse career goals. These elective courses can prepare students for immediate careers in mechanical engineering, further studies at the graduate level in engineering, and alternative careers in such fields as law, business, or finance.

Students need to complete 130 credits to graduate. The program is individualized for each student through elective courses .

First Year

See standard first-year engineering program in the general engineering section.

Second Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

ENGR 301

Solid Mechanics

3

-

CSC 113

Computer Programming I

3

-

MATH 221

Calculus III

4

-

PHYS 216

University Physics II

4

-

ENGR 202

Engineering Mechanics II

-

3

ENGR 211

Thermodynamics

-

3

ENGR 212

Electric Networks

-

3

ENGR 222

Engineering Math I

-

4

 

Liberal Studies Electives

3

3

 

Total

17

16

Third Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

MATH 309

Probability & Statistics for Engineers

3

-

ENGR 321

Electronics

3

-

ENGR 331

Fluid Mechanics

3

-

Engr 395

Engineering Materials Lab

1

-

CHRM 395

Material Science and Engineering

2

-

ME 344

System Dynamics

3

-

ME 342

Junior Design

-

3

ME 362

Heat Transfer

-

3

ME 392

Mechanical Systems and Dynamics Laboratory

-

2

PHIL 362

Professional Ethics in Engineering

-

3

 

Liberal Studies Electives

-

3

 

Total

15

14

Fourth Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

ME 441

Senior Design

3

-

ME 496

Thermal Science Lab

2

-

ME 442

Senior Project

-

3

ME 503

Structural Mechanics

-

3

ENGR 503

Control Systems

3

-

ME 530

Applied Energy Systems

3

-

 

Program Electives

3

6

 

Liberal Studies Electives

3

3

ENGR 401

Senior Seminar

1

-

 

Total

18

15

Educational Objectives of the Undergraduate Program

The educational objectives of the Mechanical Engineering Program are to develop well-rounded alumni:

  1. Whose technical and intellectual competency, versatility, and ethical foundations qualify them for immediate employment or advanced studies within the traditional mechanical engineering discipline as well as other fields of interest (e.g., other engineering disciplines, law, medicine, finance);
  2. With an understanding of the professional mechanical engineering practice;
  3. Who are productive team members and leaders, solving problems within a modern global, environmental, and ethical framework;
  4. Who are contributors to professional and educational institutions in their communities, applying their knowledge and skill towards the advancement of technology and the betterment of society;
  5. Who actively engage in lifelong learning and can adapt to an evolving global community.

Footnotes

[1] BE=Biomedical Engineering; CE=Civil Engineering; EE=Electrical Engineering; ME=Mechanical Engineering.

[2] Implies that EE selects ENGR 202.

[3] Biomedical Engineering students take BIOL 105 (4credits), BE students take CHEM 104 (3 credits), ME and CE students take ENGR 201 (3 credits) during the 2nd semester.

[4] Electrical Engineering students also take PHYS 225 (1 credit).

[5] Students who elect to take the pre med track will be required to take two semesters of organic chemistry.

[6] Courses marked by an asterisk have substantial design content. Other graduate 500 series courses taken as program electives are subject to departmental approval. New courses are frequently added. For this reason, students should consult their advisers regarding the department's recommendations and approval of each semester's program electives.