The Catholic University of America

School of Arts and Sciences

Officers of Instruction

Faculty

Lawrence R. Poos, Ph.D.
Dean; Professor of History
Hanna Marks, Ph.D.
Associate Dean, Graduate Studies; Associate Professor of German
Glen M. Johnson, Ph.D.
Associate Dean, Undergraduate Studies; Professor of English
Alyce Ann Bergkamp, M.A., M.M.
Assistant Dean, Undergraduate Studies
Andrew Abela, M.B.A., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Business and Economics
M. Sophia Aguirre, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Business and Economics
Lourdes M. Alvarez, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Spanish
Jon W. Anderson, Ph.D.
Professor of Anthropology
Diane B. Arnkoff, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Joy Banks, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Education
Aaron Barkatt, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry
Sandra Barrueco, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Psychology
Gail Beach, M.F.A.
Associate Professor for Professional Practice in Drama
Kiran R. Bhutani, Ph.D.
Professor of Mathematics
Maxwell H. Bloomfield III, Ph.D., J.D.
Professor Emeritus of History
Uta-Renate Blumenthal, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of History
Victor M. Bogdan, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
August C. Bolino, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Business and Economics
Claudia Bornholdt, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of German
James F. Brennan, Ph.D.
Provost of the University; Professor of Psychology
Greg A. Brewer, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry
Frederick C. Bruhweiler, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics
Rev. Harold A. Buetow, Ph.D., J.D.
Professor Emeritus of Education
Diane Bunce, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry
Ronald S. Calinger, Ph.D.
Professor of History
Agnes Cave, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Education
Ying-Nan Chiu, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry
Phyllis P. Chock, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of Anthropology
Deborah M. Clawson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychology
Lucy M. Cohen, Ph.D.
Professor of Anthropology
Thomas M. Cohen, Ph.D.
Curator, Oliveira Lima Library; Associate Professor of History
John J. Convey, Ph.D.
St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Professor of Education
Anita G. Cook, Ph.D.
Professor of Anthropology
Edward M. Cook, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures
Ann K. Corsi, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biology
Dennis Coyle, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
Hall L. Crannell, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Martha Cruz-Zuniga, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Business and Economics
Bruno M. Damiani, Ph.D.
Professor of Spanish
Christopher N. Darnton, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Politics
Nathalie Dautin, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Biology
Jennifer R. Davis, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of History
Charles R. Dechert, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Politics
Duilia de Mello, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Physics
Rev. George T. Dennis, S.T.L., S.Eccl.D.D.
Professor Emeritus of History
Thomas F. Donahue, Ph.D.
Professor of Drama
E. Catherine Dunn, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of English
Biprodas Dutta, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Physics
Sherif T. El-Helaly, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Sarah Brown Ferrario, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Greek and Latin
John G. Figura, M.F.A.
Assistant Professor for Professional Practice of Art
Jennifer L. Fleeger, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Media Studies
Kevin F. Forbes, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Business and Economics
Rona Frederick, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Education
Rebecca L. M. Fuller, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Psychology
Kerstin T. Gaddy, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor for Professional Practice of German
Alexander Giampietro, M.F.A.
Professor Emeritus of Art
Daniel R. Gibbons, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of English
Carol R. Glass, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Paul G. Glenn, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Marcie Goeke-Morey, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Psychology
John E. Golin, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Matthew N. Green, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Politics
James J. Greene, Ph.D.
Dean of Graduate Studies; Professor of Biology
Tobias Gregory, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English
Rev. Sidney H. Griffith, Ph.D.
Professor of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures
Joan Tasker Grimbert, Ph.D.
Professor of French
Andrew D. Gross, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures
David W. Guillet, Ph.D.
Professor of Anthropology
Rev. Thomas P. Halton, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Greek and Latin
Sandra L. Hanson, Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology
Marietta Hedges, M.F.A.
Assistant Professor of Drama
Nora M. Heimann, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Art
Jean-Michel Heimonet, Ph.D.
Professor of French
Philip Henderson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
Tanja Horn, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Physics
Jennifer Horne, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Media Studies
Barbara J. Howard, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biology
James H. Howard, Jr., Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Katherine L. Jansen, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
David A. Jobes, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Margaret Ann Kassen, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of French and Spanish
Chisup Kim, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Michael C. Kimmage, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of History
Franz Klein, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Physics
K. Jon Klein, M.F.A.
Assistant Professor of Drama
William E. Klingshirn, Ph.D.
Professor of Greek and Latin
Vadim Knyazev, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Chemistry
Lilla Kopár, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of English
Ildiko M. Kovach, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry
Steven B. Kraemer, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Physics
John A. Kromkowski, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
Jack R. Leibowitz, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Alexander Levin, Ph.D.
Professor of Mathematics
Todd M. Lidh, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of English
Guoyang Liu, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Thomas J. Long, Ed.D.
Associate Professor of Education
Maryann Cusimano Love, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
Stefania Lucamante, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Italian
Rev. John E. Lynch, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History and Canon Law
Pedro B. Macedo, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics
Michael Mack, Ph.D.
Director, University Honors Program; Associate Professor of English
Frank A.C. Mantello, Ph.D.
Professor of Greek and Latin
Kirsten Martin, M.B.A., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Business and Economics
Leopold May, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Chemistry
Laura E. Nym Mayhall, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
William J. McCarthy, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Greek and Latin
Stephen J. McKenna, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Media Studies
Farzana A. McRae, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Mathematics
Timothy Meagher, Ph.D.
University Archivist; Associate Professor of History
Paul H.E. Meijer, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Nelson H. Minnich, Ph.D.
Professor of History and Church History
Bronislaw Misztal, Ph.D.
Professor of Sociology
Jean Dietz Moss, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of English
Jerry Z. Muller, Ph.D.
Professor of History
J. Michael Mullins, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Thomas V. Nakashima, M.F.A.
Professor Emeritus of Art
Roland M. Nardone, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Biology
Virgil P. Nemoianu, Ph.D.
William J. Byron, S.J., Professor of Literature
Leonora A. Neville, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
Mary Michaela Njeri Njai, M.B.A.
Assistant Professor for Professional Practice of Business and Economics
James P. O'Connor, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Psychology
Sister Anne O'Donnell, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of English
John K.C. Oh, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Politics
Taryn L. Okuma, Ph.D. Clinical Assistant Professor of English
James P. O'Leary, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
Mario A. Ortiz, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Spanish
Ian L. Pegg, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics
Kathleen Perencevich, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Education
John F. Petruccione, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Greek and Latin
John Philip, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Physics
Alberto M. Piedra, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Business and Economics
Rev. Raymond H. Potvin, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Sociology
Enrique Pumar, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
Rebecca Rainof Mas, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of English
Venigalla B. Rao, Ph.D.
Professor of Biology
Boris Z. Reichstein, Ph.D.
Professor of Mathematics
Lorenzo L. Resca, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics
Brendan A. Rich, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Psychology
James D. Riley, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
Mario A. Rojas, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Spanish
Bruce M. Ross, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Psychology
Alexander T. Russo, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Media Studies
Claes G. Ryn, Ph.D.
Professor of Politics
Martin A. Safer, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Reza Saidi, M.B.A., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Business and Economics
Abhijit Sarkar, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Physics
Parfeny P. Saworotnow, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Stephen F. Schneck, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Politics
Merylann J. Schuttloffel, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Education
Marc M. Sebrechts, Ph.D.
Professor of Psychology
Joseph M. Sendry, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of English
J. Prasad Senesi, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Caroline R. Sherman, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of History
Mona B. Shevlin, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Education
Peter Shoemaker, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of French
Irene Slagle, Ph.D.
Professor of Chemistry
Gary Sloan, M.F.A.
Associate Professor of Drama
Daniel I. Sober, Ph.D.
Professor of Physics
Lawrence Somer, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Mathematics
Vijay Sookdeo, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Rachael Storey, B.A.
Clinical Assistant Professor of Media Studies
Ernest F. Suarez, Ph.D.
Professor of English
Donald Paul Sullins, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Sociology
Antanas Suziedelis, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Psychology
Leslie Woodcock Tentler, Ph.D.
Professor of History
Wallace J. Thies, Ph.D.
Professor of Politics
Joan L. Thompson, Ph.D.
Associate Professor for Professional Practice of Education
Patrick Tuite, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Drama
Pamela L. Tuma, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Biology
Herbert M. Ã?berall, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Jamshed Y. Uppal, M.B.A., Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Business and Economics
Joan B. Urban, Ph.D.
Professor Emerita of Politics
Barry Wagner, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Psychology
Shavaun Wall, Ph.D.

Associate Vice President for Academic Planning; Professor of Education

Rev. William A. Wallace, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of History and Philosophy
David J. Walsh, Ph.D.
Professor of Politics
Pamela S. Ward, Ph.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor of English
Carl W. Werntz, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Physics
Stephen A. West, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of History
Christopher J. Wheatley, Ph.D.
Professor of English
John K. White, Ph.D.
Professor of Politics
Gary J. Williams, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Drama
John R. Winslow, M.F.A.
Professor Emeritus of Art
Rosemary Winslow, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of English
Chad C. Wright, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Spanish
Stephen K. Wright, Ph.D.
Professor of English
Frank R. Yekovich, Ph.D.
Euphemia Lofton Haynes Professor of Education
Andrew Yeo, Ph.D. Assistant Professor of Politics
James E. Youniss, Ph.D.
Professor Emeritus of Psychology
Ernest M. Zampelli, Ph.D.
Professor of Business and Economics

Associates of the Faculty

Mohammad Adel-Hadadi, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Arthur Aikin, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Niki Akhavan, Ph.D. Visiting Assistant Professor of Media Studies
Sabine Albersmeier, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Greek and Latin
Boncho Bonev, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Cynthia Brewer, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Chemistry
Jeffrey Brosius, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Carole W. Brown, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Education
Ronald Carlson, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Mario E. Cerritelli, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Biology
Diyu Chen, Ed.D. Visiting Assistant Professor of Education
Peter C. Chen, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor of Physics
Pamela Clark, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Edward Colbert, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics
Daniel M. Crenshaw, Ph.D. Research Assistant Professor of Physics
Dana Hurley Crider, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor of Physics
Leonard DeFiore, Ed.D.
Research Assistant Professor and Brother Patrick Ellis Chair of Education
Lawrence W. Fagg, Ph.D.
Research Professor of Physics
Ralph B. Fiorito, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Michael Goodman, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Natchimuthukonar Gopalswamy, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Physics
Jeffrey Hayes, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Eleanor Holdridge, M.F.A. Visiting Assistant Professor of Drama
Sergio Ipatov, Ph.D. Research Associate, Physics
Rosina Iping, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Stuart Jordan, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Physics
Shrikanth Kanekal, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Gunther Kletetschka, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Gladys Vieira Kober, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Yoji Kondo, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Physics
Maxim Kramar, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Vladimir Krasnopolsky, Ph.D.
Research Professor of Physics
Alexander Kutepov, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Alejandro Lara-Sanchez, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Allen Lunsford, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Walter M. Madigosky, Ph.D.
Research Professor of Physics
Donald J. Michels, Ph.D.
Research Professor of Physics
Robert K. Mohr, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Thomas Moran, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor of Physics
Isabelle Müller, Ph.D.
Adjunct Assistant Professor of Physics
Norman F. Ness, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Krister Nielsen, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
James T. O'Brien, Ph.D.
Research Professor of Physics
Sten Odenwald, Ph.D. Research Associate, Physics
Leon Ofman, Ph.D. Research Associate Professor of Physics
Vladimir Osherovich, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Charles R. Proffitt, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Lutz Rastaetter, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Nelson Reginald, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Michael Reiner, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Raffaele Resta, Ph.D.
Adjunct Professor of Physics
Richard Schwartz, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Robin Selinger, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics
Malgorzata Selwa, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Leszek J. Sibilski, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Sociology
Myron A. Smith, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Andrea Sobel, Ph.D.
Clinical Associate, Education
Orville Chris St. Cyr, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Physics
Richard Starr, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Guillermo Stenborg, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
David Steyert, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Janet A. Timbie, Ph.D.
Adjunct Associate Professor of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures
Cheryl Y. Trepagnier, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Psychology
Rafaela Fiore Urízar, Ph.D. Visiting Assistant Professor of Spanish
Ekaterina Verner, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Geronimo Villaneuva, Ph.D. Research Associate, Physics
Maria-Amelia Viteri, Ph.D. Visiting Assistant Professor of Anthropology
Glen M. Wahlgren, Ph.D.
Research Associate Professor of Physics
Gerald Williger, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Hong Xie, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics
Seiji Yashiro, Ph.D.
Research Associate, Physics

 

Objectives

 

 

By vocation, the Universitas magistrorum et scholarium is dedicated to research, to teaching and to the education of students who freely associate with their teachers in a common love of knowledge. With every other University it shares that gaudium de veritate, so precious to Saint Augustine, which is that joy of searching for, discovering and communicating truth in every field of knowledge. A Catholic University's privileged task is "to unite existentially by intellectual effort two orders of reality that too frequently tend to be placed in opposition as though they were antithetical: the search for truth, and the certainty of already knowing the fount of truth."

Ex Corde Ecclesiae

We who are dedicated to teaching and learning here in the School of Arts and Sciences at The Catholic University of America share some simple convictions.

We believe that despite the increasing complexities of a globalizing world, the traditional core of humanities, arts, social sciences, and natural sciences still provides the best educational launching pad for our undergraduates, and still constitutes the most dynamic, most essential core of higher research. We maintain that our Catholic mission and identity enable us to marry reason and faith in a way that enriches every discipline. We are convinced that the best teachers are the best researchers, and we seek to attract and retain the best faculty dedicated to primary research as well as graduate and undergraduate teaching. We know from experience that our location in the nation's capital allows us to offer students a stunning array of cultural experiences, work, research, and internship opportunities, and quality of life.

By far the biggest school at CUA, arts and sciences currently enrolls approximately 2,000 undergraduates and 600 graduate students. The school encompasses 18 departments and several more nondepartmental programs, with a regular faculty of more than 165. We currently list more than 50 undergraduate majors and more than 50 graduate degree programs.

 

 

Administration

In 1975, the Graduate School and the College of Arts and Sciences were combined to form the present School of Arts and Sciences.

The Academic Council, composed of the heads of departments with the dean as chair, is the standing committee of the faculty, with the primary responsibility for the administration of the school. The Academic Council operates under the supervision of the chancellor, president, provost, and dean. Its recommendations are made to these and other proper authorities, as well as to the faculty. Such recommendations include, among others, the approval of candidates for degrees. The faculty is represented, proportionally to its size, along with the other schools of the university, in the Academic Senate, a combined administration-faculty body having primary responsibility for academic policies and procedures, and in the graduate and undergraduate boards, faculty committees that oversee university-wide academic matters.

Degree programs within the school are provided through the various departments of instruction.

Curricula

Major Programs

The following departmental and interdepartmental majors are offered:

Accounting/B.S.B.A.
Anthropology
Art/Art History
Art/Studio Art
Art/Studio Art and Secondary Education
Biochemistry/B.A.
Biochemistry/B.S.
Biology/B.A.
Biology/B.S.
Chemical Physics
Chemistry/B.S.
Classical Civilization
Classical Humanities
Classics (Greek and Latin)
Drama
Drama and Secondary Education
Early Childhood Education
Economics/B.A.
Economics/B.S.B.A.
Education Studies
Elementary Education
English Language and Literature
English and Secondary Education
Environmental Chemistry/B.S.
Finance/B.S.B.A.
French
French and Secondary Education
German
German and Secondary Education
History
History and Secondary Education
International Business/B.S.B.A.
International Economics and Finance/B.S.B.A.
Management/B.S.B.A.
Management Information Systems/B.S.B.A.
Marketing/B.S.B.A.
Mathematics/B.A.
Mathematics/B.S.
Mathematics and Secondary Education
Mathematics/Physics/B.S.
Media Studies
Medical Technology
Medieval and Byzantine Studies
Music
Philosophy
Philosophy/Pre-Law
Physics/B.A.
Physics/B.S.
Politics
Psychology
Social Work [see note 1 below]
Sociology
Spanish
Spanish and Secondary Education
Spanish for International Service
Theology and Religious Studies

1. Beginning in 2010-2011, all Social Work majors will matriculate in the National Catholic School of Social Service.

2. Students interested in computer science should consult the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in the School of Engineering section of these Announcements.

3. While majors are not offered in the following subjects, course sequences are provided, making it possible in most instances to meet the requirements for graduate study or for professional certification:

a. Italian
b. Library and Information Science
c. Semitic and Egyptian Languages

4. The Department of Education offers programs leading to teacher certification at the early childhood and elementary levels, and-through joint programs with subject-area departments-at the secondary level. Secondary education programs are available in art, drama, English, French, German, history, mathematics, and Spanish. (For music education programs, see the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music section of these Announcements.) For more information on certification programs, contact the director of teacher education in the Department of Education.

Accelerated Degree Programs

For additional information on the accelerated programs described below, the student should consult the associate dean for undergraduate studies in the School of Arts and Sciences.

Three-Year Bachelor's Degree Program
Students of exceptional achievement may earn the bachelor's degree in three years. This may be accomplished by over-electing six courses each semester after the first (a 3.0 grade-point average is required to over-elect), plus completing five courses during summer sessions. Special recognition at commencement is accorded to students who complete this accelerated degree program. This recognition is not available for students who transfer to CUA from other institutions. The number of transfer courses after CUA matriculation is also limited for students seeking this recognition; see the assistant dean for details.

B.A.-M.A./B.S.-M.S. Program
The School of Arts and Sciences offers to students with outstanding academic records (minimum 3.5 grade-point average) the possibility of beginning work toward a master's degree during both semesters of their senior year. In such cases, up to four courses may, with approval, be applied to both undergraduate and graduate degree requirements. However, all requirements for the bachelor's degree must be completed before credits toward the master's degree may be applied, and all M.A. or M.S. requirements must be completed within five years of matriculation. Application should be made at the beginning of the junior year and must be completed by the end of the junior year. A 3.5 cumulative grade-point average is required at the time of application.

Six-Year B.A.-J.D. Program (Law)
A cooperative program of the School of Arts and Sciences and the Columbus School of Law allows undergraduates to apply for admission to the Columbus School of Law after three years in the School of Arts and Sciences. The program is open to all undergraduates regardless of major field, but enrollment is limited. Acceptance depends upon a superior undergraduate academic record, success on the Law School Admission Test, and an estimate of the student's ability to pursue the study of law after the junior year. Initial steps to enter the program should be taken before the end of the sophomore year, when a 3.6 grade-point average is required, and application made to the law school in the second semester of the junior year. Successful candidates receive the B.A. degree at the end of the fourth year and the J.D. degree two years thereafter

CUAbroad: Education Abroad Programs
CUAbroad (Education Abroad Office) works with the various academic and administrative units campus-wide to provide a wide array of education abroad opportunities for both CUA and non-CUA students. CUAbroad offers short-term as well as semester- or year-long programs, honors study abroad, international internships, and intensive language programs. CUAbroad also provides specialized services to CUA students, such as education abroad advising, an education abroad resource library, issuance of the International Student ID card, and travel insurance information. CUAbroad is part of the Center for Global Education at CUA, which advances the international character of the university by promoting, supporting, and developing international and intercultural education opportunities for members of the CUA community.

Professional Education

Accounting
The Department of Business and Economics offers programs in accounting to prepare the student who intends eventually to take the examination for Certified Public Accounting (CPA) or the examination for Certified Management Accounting (CMA). The educational and experience requirements of boards of accountancy vary from state to state. It is the student's responsibility to determine the requirements that must be met in his or her state in order to sit for the examination, and to request changes in the program to meet those requirements. The department maintains a current directory of requirements for all states, territories, and the District of Columbia and can assist the student in meeting these requirements. Students have the advantage of small classes for greater individual attention as well as of advising from faculty with professional experience. Internships and part-time employment at offices of private firms and federal government agencies are also available.

Education
Preparation for teaching certification is provided for those planning to enter the teaching profession at the early childhood, elementary, or secondary school level. (For specific secondary programs, consult the Department of Education section of these Announcements and note 4 under Major Programs, above.) The teacher education unit is fully accredited by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and most programs are nationally recognized by NCATE's Specialized Professional Associations. All programs are currently approved by District of Columbia jurisdictions. A standard teaching certificate may be obtained from the District of Columbia upon completion of a teacher education program. At this time, the District of Columbia has reciprocity agreements with 44 states.

Social Work
Adviser: Lynn Milgram Mayer, Ph.D., National Catholic School of Social Service
Note: Beginning in 2010-2011, undergraduate Social Work majors will matriculate in the National Catholic School of Social Service.
Undergraduate preparation for social work is best accomplished within the framework of a liberal arts curriculum. Courses selected from the social and behavioral sciences (including psychology, sociology, politics, economics, anthropology, and history) and from biology comprise the broad knowledge base on which the more specialized courses in social work theory and practice draw. A series of courses specific to the field of social welfare and to the practice of social work is offered by the National Catholic School of Social Service to the student majoring in social work. Theory and practice courses include sustained field education experiences.
A major in social work is preparation for direct entry into practice at the first professional level. It may also serve as preparation for graduate professional social work education.
Students interested in social work should communicate with the social work adviser as early as possible for advice or information concerning a program of study.
For further information consult the Program in Social Work section of these Announcements.

Preprofessional Advising
Law
Prelegal education is mainly concerned with the development of
1. comprehension and verbal expression,
2. critical understanding of human institutions and the values with which the law deals, and
3. creative power of thinking.
These goals have led the committee on Prelegal Education of the Association of American Law Schools to conclude that college education that emphasizes the development of these basic skills and insights is far more important than "mere education for later professional training and practice." This means that colleges serve the need of later legal training best by stressing the ends of liberal education. While, therefore, thorough learning in any wide cultural field will meet the above mentioned requirements, the special background acquired in one of the following areas of concentration may prove particularly helpful: economics, English, history, philosophy, politics, or sociology. For further information on preparing for law school, interested students may contact the undergraduate office of the School of Arts and Sciences or the Office of Career Services, which provides a thorough website on applying to law school:
http://careers.cua.edu/gradinfo/lawschool.cfm.

Library and Information Science
Preparation for practice in information fields usually requires a graduate degree, and for librarians the basic requirement is a master's degree from a program accredited by the American Library Association. Although no specific academic background is required for graduate study in the field, CUA's ALA-accredited M.S. in Library Science program seeks applicants with a broad background in the arts and sciences, plus depth in a major field. The ideal applicant is comfortable with information technology and able to communicate clearly and effectively both orally and in writing. Analytical and problem-solving abilities and an understanding of the research process in a specific discipline are also highly valued. For more information, contact the assistant dean of the School of Library and Information Science.

Medicine, Dentistry, Allopathic and Osteopathic Medicine, Optometry, Podiatric Medicine, Veterinary Medicine
Premedical Advisory Committee:
Marion Ficke, M.S..........................Premedical Coordinator and
Assistant to the Chair, Department of Biology
Cynthia Brewer, Ph.D...Adjunct Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Alan Goodman, Ph.D............Director, Office of Career Services
Premedical Advising at The Catholic University of America includes students preparing for all of the medical fields noted above. The advisement is designed to provide the education, as well as the guidance, that will best enable students to pursue their goals as practitioners or medical researchers.
In accordance with the concept of undergraduate study at a liberal arts institution, there is no separate curriculum for premedical instruction. Students choose a major suited to their interests and talents. Most premedical students follow a program of concentration in biology, biochemistry, chemistry, medical technology, or psychology; however, the premedical student may choose from a wide range of liberal arts majors. Another option is biomedical engineering in the School of Engineering. The required premedical courses are incorporated into the requirements in certain of the science programs and are taken as electives in other areas of concentration. All of the undergraduate programs in the School of Arts and Sciences are designed to provide a well-balanced liberal education, strongly preferred for premedical students.
Students interested in Premedical Advising should communicate with the premedical coordinator. CUA also welcomes students who have earned degrees and are interested in pursuing premedical courses.

Bachelor of Arts Degree Requirements

Forty credit-bearing courses of at least three semester hours each are required, with a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 for courses taken at this university. At least half the courses in a degree program must be taken at The Catholic University of America. The number of transfer courses after matriculation at CUA is limited to two times the number of years in residence; this limit does not apply to courses brought in at the time of matriculation or to courses taken during CUA Education Abroad programs. In addition, no more than two courses per year may be transferred from summer terms at other institutions.

Normal course load and over-electing
The normal course load is five courses (three or more credits each) per semester. A student who earns a 3.0 semester grade-point average or has a 3.0 cumulative average may over-elect a sixth course in the following semester.

Distribution Requirements
For more detailed information on the seven categories summarized below, consult the Arts & Sciences Advising Handbook (available online at http://arts-sciences.cua.edu) or the undergraduate office of the School of Arts and Sciences.

1. Philosophy. Four courses, including PHIL 201 and 202 and one additional course in each of these two areas: Logic, Morality, and Action; and Nature Knowledge, and God. (For courses within each area, consult the Program in Philosophy section of these Announcements.)

2. Theology and Religious Studies. Four courses, including two at the 200 level (the first of which must be in Christian tradition, TRS 200-261, or 291 for students from non-Christian backgrounds), and at least one course at the 300 level or higher.

3. English Composition. One course, as determined by placement at matriculation, with grade of C- or higher.

4. Humanities. Three courses, at least two in the same department.

5. Language and Literature. Four courses: two courses at the intermediate level (usually 103-104) in an ancient or modern foreign language; and two courses in ancient or modern literature (including literature in English).

6. Mathematics and Natural Science. Four courses, including at least one in mathematics; at least two of the four must be in the same department.

7. Social and Behavioral Sciences. Four courses, at least two of which must be in the same department.

Major Program
Twelve to fourteen courses. (No more than fourteen courses are permitted in the major department.) See departmental requirements in these Announcements. Each course in the major must be passed with a grade of C- or higher. Courses in the major simultaneously fulfill the distribution requirement in the area corresponding to that discipline.

Electives
Courses other than distribution and major requirements are free electives. A department may require, beyond specific courses in the major, as many as eight courses in a closely related and necessary secondary field; therefore, the number of electives will vary depending upon the student's major.

Pass-fail grading for free electives. Prior to the deadline published in the Academic Calendar, free electives may be taken on a pass/fail basis. Approval of the associate or assistant dean is required to make this change. Neither pass nor fail for a course taken on this basis will affect the student's cumulative average, but fail will earn no degree credit. Courses taken pass/fail may not be used to fulfill major, minor, or distribution requirements.

Senior Comprehensive Assessment
During the senior year, each undergraduate degree student must pass a Senior Comprehensive Assessment, designed and administered by the major department or program. The comprehensive assessment evaluates majors' ability to synthesize the subject matter and methods of the discipline.

 

Bachelor of Science Degree Requirements

The departments of Biology, Business and Economics, Chemistry, Mathematics, and Physics, as well as the programs in Biochemistry and Medical Technology, offer the degree Bachelor of Science. (The B.S. in Computer Science is offered by the School of Engineering.) Students pursuing this degree are required to take more courses in mathematics and science and, to compensate, have the number of free electives and distribution requirements reduced.
Each B.S. program is arranged differently, so students must consult the specific department involved for special requirements of the particular program.

Rules Concerning Probation and Dismissal

A student whose cumulative grade-point average is below 2.0 is on academic probation. A student on academic probation may register for a maximum of four courses (of three or more credits each) and may not participate in extracurricular activities such as student government and intercollegiate athletics. For full information on academic standing, including academic probation and academic warning, see the policies.cua.edu website.

Any of the following is grounds for academic dismissal from the School of Arts and Sciences:

  1. Failure to gain a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average after two semesters on academic probation.
  2. Failure in three or more courses in any given semester.
  3. At the end of the spring semester of any academic year, a cumulative grade-point average below 1.5.
  4. Failure to gain acceptance into a program of concentration after the fourth semester of full-time college work (or after the semester in which the student completes his or her 17th course).

A student on probation may not graduate until he or she has gained a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average.

Minor Programs

A student in the School of Arts and Sciences may choose to complete one or more optional minors in fields outside the major department. (Majors in a foreign language may, however, minor in another foreign language.) Most minors consist of six courses, as specified by the appropriate department. Substitutions are generally not permitted and no course may be taken on a pass/fail basis. A maximum of two courses in a minor may be transferred from other institutions, provided that these courses are evaluated as equivalent to the courses specified in the minor. Information and applications are available in the undergraduate office, School of Arts and Sciences.

Department of Anthropology

Professors

Jon W. Anderson, Chair; Lucy M. Cohen; Anita Cook; David Guillet

Visiting Assistant Professor Maria Amelia Viteri

Lecturers

David T. Clark; Patricia S. Maloof; Marilyn Merritt; Tadeusz Mich; Raul Sanchez Molina; Sandra Scham

Anthropology is the study of human diversity from the Paleolithic to the present, how humans form and think about communities, make a living, impact the environment, communicate, express themselves in art, religion, language, and in practical activities. Anthropologists employ a global and comparative perspective to integrate different kinds of information about past and contemporary ways of life in the natural situations where people live or have lived, such as an archaeological site, a village, or an urban metropolis. The aim of this research is also to develop composite, empirically based accounts of human life and cultures. Students in anthropology acquire a broad perspective on social and cultural dimensions of diverse ways of life, including our own, and tools for integrating specialized knowledge into perspectives on global processes that shape our world.

Courses for anthropology majors leading to a B.A. include four courses in the foundational disciplines of cultural anthropology (101), archaeology (108), human biology and evolution (105), and linguistic anthropology (110); a pair of core courses on anthropological perspectives (200) and research design and conduct (201); five topical electives; and a senior capstone that can be a seminar (451), internship/practicum (453), or independent research (493) directed by a faculty member. Courses in the HSSS sequence serve for social science distribution requirements or as free electives for majors. A joint B.A.-M.A. is available to qualified students.

The distribution requirement in math/natural science may be fulfilled in part by ANTH 105, 108, 218, and 354.

The distribution requirement in social sciences for non-anthropology majors may be fulfilled in part by any ANTH course other than those designated as fulfilling the natural science requirement.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site anthropology.cua.edu/ for descriptions and schedule of courses offered in the current semester.

ANTH

Course Title

101

Introduction to Anthropology: Cultures in a Global Society

105

Human Evolution

108

Introduction to Archaeology

110

Speech and Experience: Anthropology of Language

136

Magic, Witchcraft and Religion (Summer only)

200

Core Perspectives in Anthropology

201

Research Design and Conduct in Anthropology

202

Sex and Culture in Modern World

214

The Anthropology of Food

215

Archaeology of the Biblical Lands

217

Migrants, Refugees and the Homeless

218

End of Nature? Environmental Degradation in a Globalizing Society

220

Technology and Society

240

Ethnicity

250

Political Anthropology

254

Ancient Cultures of South America

259

Ancient Art and Architecture

260

Religion, Thought and Moral Imagination

270

The Information Society

310

Islam in the Modern World

313

Environment and Society

315

Globalization and the Culture of Capitalism

320

Eastern North American Archaeology

322

Lost Cities and Ancient Empires

334

The Incas

354

Archaeology of Settlements and Landscapes

355

Latinos and Latinas in the U.S.

366

Identity and Community in America

371

Latin America in the New Millennium

390

Politics and Religion in Middle East

451

Senior Seminar

 

 

453

Practicum/Internship in Anthropology

454

Senior Thesis in Anthropology

493

Student-Faculty Research

498

Student-Faculty Research

 

 

505

Applied Anthropology

506

Applied Archaeology

507

Applied Anthropology in the Ministry

508

Anthropology and Salvadoran Migration: Ethnography and Policy

518

Andean Symbolism and Iconography

520

Eastern North American Archaeology

541

Health Society and Culture

560

Method and Theory in Archaeology

580

Selected Topics in Area Studies

590

Ethnohistory

 

 

Department of Art

Professors Emeriti

Alexander Giampietro; Thomas Nakashima; John R. Winslow

Associate Professor

Nora M. Heimann, Chair

Assistant Professors

John G. Figura

Adjunct Assistant Professor Lisa K. Lipinski

Lecturers

Jeffrey Andrews; Robert Barnard; Matthew Barrick; Vivien Chen; Orgu Dalgic; Mary Frank; Steve Jones; Kurt Godwin; Beatrice Keefe; Candace Keegan; Kevin Mitchell; Manuel Navarrete; Opher Mansour; Gary Pierpoint; Beverly Ress; Jessica Richardson; Erik Sandberg

 

"Between the world of men and transcendent divinity there exists art. Art is the will to truth made physically manifest."

-Andre Malraux

The Department of Art is devoted to nurturing the production and understanding of artistic expression, one of the oldest, most vital, and most human of endeavors. The department offers programs in art history and studio art leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree. An interdisciplinary B.A. in studio art and secondary education is also offered in cooperation with the Department of Education. Together, these programs are dedicated to the proposition that art and culture are one, and that exposure to the visual arts is an essential component of every liberal education. Our goal of fostering a greater appreciation of the arts is especially fitting at The Catholic University of America, given both the historic tradition of brilliant art patronage by the Catholic Church, and the outstanding resources of Washington, D.C. Among the many nearby institutions that offer world-class art collections are the National Gallery of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, the Phillips Collection, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Library of Congress, Hillwood, and Dumbarton Oaks. Students in the department are encouraged to utilize these resources through study, institutional internships and sponsored research, whenever possible.

Through courses both within and outside the department, art majors are provided with a broad introduction to the humanities, as well as a sophisticated initiation into the practice, theory, and appreciation of the arts. The major in the studio art program takes two courses each in the fundamentals of design, drawing and composition, and art history, followed by a three-course sequence in painting, sculpture or digital arts, plus one additional studio art elective. Studio art majors are also required to take contemporary art history. The major in the art history program takes survey courses in the history of art and architecture, one studio course, and a selection of specialized courses from each of the following three periods: ancient and medieval, Renaissance and Baroque, modern and contemporary. Majors in both programs take the Senior Seminar. Studio Art majors also take the Junior Seminar. Art history majors take comprehensive examinations in their senior year. Studio art majors produce a creative project under the direction of an art faculty member to fulfill the senior assessment requirement. Seniors in art history who qualify for honors have the opportunity to earn further distinction by writing a senior honors thesis under the supervision of their faculty adviser.

To be accepted as a major, an applicant for the program in Studio Art must have a B average in ART 101 and 102, 201 and 202, and 211 and 212. An applicant for the program in art history must have a B average in ART 211 and 212, and in one other art history course. Students who have not completed these courses by the end of their sophomore year may be accepted conditionally until the courses are completed.

Double majors (the B.A. in Art plus another disciplinary area) are encouraged and may be arranged through the Department of Art, the other department and the dean of the School of Arts and Sciences. Minors in studio art and art history are also available.

Please Note: Due to space restrictions, certain courses have limited enrollments. Students who wish to enroll in these courses (labeled "departmental approval required" [DA]) should contact the department office at the time of registration to receive permission to enroll.

B.A. with Major in Studio Art

Required art courses: ART 101, 102, 201, 202, 211, 212, 332, 353, 451, and any three courses in the following areas: painting, sculpture or digital arts; one course in one of the remaining two areas and one studio art elective.

B.A. with Major in Art History

Required art and art history courses: ART 211, 212, 332,451, and one course from each of the following three periods: Ancient and Medieval: ART 317, 318, Renaissance and Baroque: ART 319, 320, 321, 322, 327, 365, 368; Modern and Contemporary: ART 323, 324, 325, 326, 331, 334, 357, 367, 420; in addition, four electives to be drawn from the three categories of period courses above, or from other art history courses; and one of the following studio courses: ART 201, 202, 303 or 304.

Departmental Honors in Art History

Students with honors-level grade point averages who wish to receive departmental honors in art history may apply to write a senior honors thesis by submitting a two-page proposal for their thesis (including a description of topic and an annotated bibliography). To qualify, these students first must have evidenced a superior performance in the major, as well as the ability to complete the proposed paper topic. The thesis proposal must also be approved by the student's faculty adviser and one outside reader before the start of the student's senior year. Progress in completing the Senior Honors thesis will be guided through the student's enrollment in ART 481 (Senior Honors Tutorial). Awards will be given to thesis projects that successfully demonstrate a high degree of scholarly achievement and self-motivation.

Courses Offered

Please consult tthe Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

ART

Course Title

101, 102

Fundamentals of Design I, II

112

Foundations of Art

201, 202

Drawing and Composition I, II

205, 206

Watercolor Painting

211

History of Art: Prehistory to the Middle Ages

212

History of Art: From the Renaissance to the Modern Age

221

The Enlightenment and the Modern World

231, 232

Introduction to Digital Arts I, II

303, 304

Painting I, II

305, 306

Sculpture I, II

307

Sculpture in Digital Space

308

Metal Sculpture

309

Introduction to Photography

314

Art Concepts and Studio Skills

315

Web Design and Flash

317

Greek Art and Architecture

318

Roman Art and Architecture

319

Renaissance Art

320

Baroque Art

321

Venetian Renaissance Art

322

The Visual Culture of Renaissance Rome

323

Nineteenth Century Art: Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Realism, and Impressionism

324

Realism and Impressionism (Later Nineteenth Century Art)

325

Neoclassicism and Romanticism

326

American Art and Culture: From the Colonial Period to the Civil War

327

Art of Baroque Rome

328

The Art and Literature of Paris

329

Introduction to Digital Photography and Photoshop

330

Rembrandt van Rijn: Painting and Graphic Work

331

Modern Art: From Post-Impressionism to Modernism (1880s-1945)

332

Contemporary Art (1945-Present)

333

Digital Arts II

334

History of Photography

335

Western Medieval Art and Architecture

336

Seventeenth Century Dutch Painting

337 Method & Materials in Painting

338

Love and Ecstasy in Renaissance Art

339

Intermediate Photography

340

Women in Art

341

Islamic Art and Architecture

342

Introduction to Web Design

343 Introduction to Sound Production & Design

344

Multimedia Art Using Final Cut Pro

345

Art and Power

346 Art, Religion & Magic in Italy

351

Art in the Museums

353

Junior Studio Art Seminar

354

American Pop Art in the 1960's

355

Selected Topics in Art, Religion, and Social Change

356 Gentileschi & Caravaggio

357

DaDa and Surrealism

358 The Cult of Saints in Medieval Europe

364

Advanced Multimedia Art Using Final Cut Pro

365

Selected Topics in 18th, 19th and 20th Century Art

367

Van Gogh and His Circle

368

Michelangelo: Painter, Sculptor, Architect

369 The Problems of the "Modern Manner": Italian Art from Bellini to Raphel

370

Selected Problems in Chinese and Japanese Art

371

Modern Manner: Italian Art from Bellini to Raphael

372 American Art and Culture: From the Age of Discovery to the Age of Lincoln
373 Art and Spirituality: Making and Meaning in Medieval Italy 1100-1400

381

Figure Drawing

382

Figure Painting

383

Video Art

390 Early Christian Art & Architecture

401

Advanced Painting

406

Advanced Sculpture

408

Advanced Metal Sculpture

410

Introduction to Digital Photography

411

Advanced Digital Photography

420

Art and Critical Theory

422

Body and/as Image:Expression, Identity, and Subjectivity

430 Independent Study Art History

439

Advanced Photography

442 Advance Web Design Using CSS

446

Painting

451

Senior Studio Art Coordinating Seminar

451A

Senior Art History Coordinating Seminar

456

Advanced Studio Problems

462

Twentieth Century Art

471

Ceramics Art

473 Studio Concepts: Virtues and Vices

474

Seeing is Believing

481

Senior Honors Tutorial

498, 499

Internship

508 Drawing and Painting
528 Ceramics Art
533 Western Medieval Art and Architecture
566 The Allure of Egypt
571 Advanced Ceramics Art
585 Methods and Concepts of Art Education
590 Early Christian Art & Architecture
595, 596

Independent Study

598

Internship

Program in Biochemistry

Program Committee

John Golin, Biology; Ildiko Kovach, Chemistry

An interdepartmental committee (biology and chemistry) administers the major program in biochemistry. Students following this program will fulfill the course requirements for entrance to most medical schools. Undergraduate research is encouraged. Further information can be obtained from the chair of the committee.

Prerequisites. BIO 105, 106; CHEM 103, 113, 104, 114, 203, 213, 204, 214; PHYS 215 (or 205), 216 (or 206), 225, 226; MATH 111 (or 121), 112 (or 122).

Required for the B.S. CHEM 351, 353, 505, 508, 518, 571, 572, 596; two of the following: BIO 207, 518, 549, 538, 586 or another advanced BIO course with the approval of the biochemistry committee.

Required for B.A. CHEM 351, 353, 505, 508, 571, 572, 596; two of the following: BIO 207, 518, 549, 538, 586 or another advanced BIO course with the approval of the biochemistry committee.

Department of Biology

Professors

John E. Golin; James J. Greene; J. Michael Mullins; Venigalla B. Rao, Chair

Professor Emeritus

Roland M. Nardone

Associate Professors

Assistant Professor

Ann K. Corsi; Barbara J. Howard; Pamela Tuma

Nathalie A. Dautin

Adjunct Associate Professor

Mario E. Cerritelli

Assistant to the Chair and Premedical Coordinator

Marion B. Ficke

Lecturer

Lori Estes

The Department of Biology offers programs leading to the degrees Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science, and Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology. Students may pursue the honors track in biology by selecting a research experience and advanced electives.

Undergraduate course offerings in the Department of Biology are intended to provide both majors and minors with current information necessary for the understanding of life processes and their bearing on contemporary problems and objectives. A major in biology or medical technology automatically fulfills requirements for most schools offering postgraduate studies in medicine, dentistry, or veterinary medicine, as well as for graduate studies in various disciplines within biology and related fields. Preparation for postgraduate employment in biological and biomedical research is available through selected offerings.

The distribution requirements in natural science may be fulfilled in part by BIOL 103 and 104. Certain other biology courses may be taken by a limited number of non-majors, with the permission of the instructor, to complete the requirement or for a minor in biology.

Prerequisites for a major in biology. BIOL 105, 106, 207, 210, 218; CHEM 103, 113, 104, 114, 203, 213, 204, 214; MATH 111, 112. Required. BIOL 452, 518, 549, 554, 556, two other biology courses; PHYS 205, 206, 225, 226; and two natural science electives. Students electing the B.S. will select additional science courses.

For information on the major and courses in medical technology, see the Medical Technology Program section in these Announcements.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

BIO

Course Titles

103, 104

General Biology I, II

105,106

Mechanisms of Life I, II (4,4)

 

 

207

Genetics (4)

210

Molecular Cell Biology

218

Molecular Cell Biology Lab (1)

223

Microbiology

232, 233

Human Anatomy and Physiology I, II (4,4)

341

Ecology

452

Coordinating Seminar

471

Medical Technology Orientation (0)

473, 474

Clinical Chemistry I, II

475, 476

Hematology I, II (4,3)

477, 478

Immunohematology I, II (4,3)

479, 480

Clinical Microbiology I, II (4,3)

484

Lab Management and Education (1)

485

Clinical Chemistry Practicum

487

Hematology Practicum (2)

488

Immunohematology Practicum (2)

489

Clinical Microbiology Practicum

491

Clinical Lab Instrumentation

497

Urinalysis and Body Fluids

518

Physiology (4)

538

Gene Organ and Expression

540

Mechanisms of Gene Mutation and Gene Transformation

549

General Microbiology (4)

554

Biological Chemistry

556

Biological Chemistry Lab (1)

559

Cell Structure and Function

563

Developmental Biology

565

Model Organisms and Human Disease

566

Immunology

 

 

574

Virology

577, 578

Research Problems in Biology I, II

584

Mechanisms of Bacterial Pathogenesis

586

Molecular Genetics and Recombinant DNA Methodology

596

Bioinformatics

598


Membrane Trafficking and Disease

599

Signal Transduction and Membranes

 

 

Department of Business and Economics

Department of Business and Economics

Professor

Ernest M. Zampelli

Professors Emeriti

August C. Bolino; Alberto M. Piedra

Associate Professors

Andrew Abela, Chair; M. Sophia Aguirre; Kevin F. Forbes; Reza Saidi; Jamshed Y. Uppal

Assistant Professors

Martha Cruz-Zuniga; Kirsten Martin

Clinical Assistant Professor in Accounting Mary Njai

Senior Lecturer and Advising Coordinator

Jean-Claude Léon

Distinguished Lecturers

Ziaeddin Mafaher; Raymond J. Wyrsch

Senior Lecturers

Margaret McGuire; Paul Radich; Sharon Virga;

Lecturers

Philip Brach; John Ghostley; Shahin Mafaher; John Shoraka; Maria Viola

The Department of Business and Economics offers a B.S. in Business Administration, B.S.B.A. Within this degree program, students may choose from among the following majors: accounting, economics, finance, international business, international economics and finance, marketing, management, and management of information systems. The department also offers a B.A. in Economics. See the advising coordinator for information about the B.A. in Economics.

 

B.S.B.A. Degree Core Courses

ECON 101

Principles of Macroeconomics

ECON 102

Principles of Microeconomics

MGT 218

Computer Applications in Business

MGT 240

Management of Information Systems

ECON 241

Intermediate Macroeconomics (or ECON 543)

ECON 242

Intermediate Microeconomics (or ECON 546 Managerial Economics depending on the major)

ACCT 305

Introduction to Financial Accounting

ACCT 306

Introduction to Managerial Accounting

ECON 323

Introduction to Statistics I

ECON 324

Introduction to Statistics II and Econometrics

MGT 423

Management Theory and Practice

MGT 426

Financial Management

MGT 501

Ethics in Business and Economics

MGT 521 or 522

Business Law I or Business Law II

MGT 545

Marketing Management

MGT 575

Strategic Management (Senior Capstone)

 

Additional Requirements for Each Major


Accounting

 

ACCT 410

Intermediate Accounting I

ACCT 411

Intermediate Accounting II

ACCT 509

Cost Accounting

ACCT 511

Auditing

 

Two courses approved by the department

Economics

 

ECON 548

Industrial Organization

ECON 549

Regulatory Economics

ECON 559

Public Finance

 

Three courses approved by the department

Finance

 

MGT 532

Investment Analysis

MGT 534

Corporate Finance I

MGT 536

Corporate Finance II

 

Three courses approved by the department

International Business

MGT 590

International Business

MGT 562

International Marketing

MGT 589

International Corporate Finance and

 

Three courses approved by the department

International Economics and Finance

MGT 532

Investment Analysis

MGT 534

Corporate Finance I

MGT 589

International Corporate Finance

ECON 580

The Economics of International Trade

ECON 581

The Economics of International Finance

 

One course approved by the department

Marketing

MGT 548

Sales Management

MGT 547

Consumer Behavior

MGT 546

Marketing Research

 

Three courses approved by the department

Management

MGT 530

Human Resources Management

MGT 510

Leadership and Organization

MGT 511

Organizational Behavior

 

Three courses approved by the department

Management of Information Systems (MIS)

MGT 327

Systems Analysis and Design

MGT 338

Introduction to the Internet and E-commerce

MGT 431

Database Management

MGT 565

Quantitative Methods and Decision Support Systems

All departmental courses must be completed with a grade of C- or better. A student may repeat only one of the three following courses: ECON 101, Principles of Macroeconomics; ECON 102, Principles of Microeconomics; and ACCT 305, Introductory Accounting. Other courses in the department may be repeated only once. Students must maintain a 2.3 grade-point average within the department.

A total of six courses in mathematics, computer science, and statistics are required for all programs in the department. MATH 111, Calculus for Social-Life Sciences I, is required for all students. Specific majors such as economics, finance, and MIS have additional math/computer science requirements. See the advising coordinator for details. All mathematics and computer science courses must be passed with at least a C-.

All students must pass a senior year comprehensive assessment administered twice a year, independently of any course. Students take this examination in their last year in residence at CUA, by which time they must have completed all core courses plus all required courses for their major.

The department also offers minor programs in the areas of economics, accounting, finance, management, and MIS. These programs are only open to nonmajors.

Students majoring in accounting who intend eventually to take the Certified Public Accounting (CPA) examination should be aware that the educational and experience requirements of boards of accountancy vary from state to state. In some states, the number of credit hours needed to sit for the exam exceeds the number of credit hours that a student would typically earn in an undergraduate program. It is the student's responsibility to determine the requirements that must be met in his or her state to sit for the examination and to request changes in his or her program so as best to meet those requirements. The department maintains a current directory of the requirements for all states, territories, and the District of Columbia and can assist the student in meeting the requirements.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

Accounting

ACCT

Course Title

305

Introductory Accounting

306

Introductory Managerial Accounting

410

Intermediate Accounting I

411

Intermediate Accounting II

494

Contemporary Accounting Issues

500

Internship

509

Cost Accounting

511

Auditing

518

Advanced Accounting

519

Federal Taxation I

520

Income Tax Accounting II

525

Accounting and Budgeting Systems

575

International Accounting

Economics

ECON

Course Title

101

Principles of Macroeconomics

102

Principles of Microeconomics

103

Principles of Economics I (University Honors)

104

Principles of Economics II (UH)

241

Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

242

Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

309

Money and Banking

323

Introduction to Statistics I

324

Statistics II: Introductory Econometrics

334

Capitalism, Globalization, and Consumption

461

Math Economics

463

Econometric Models

493

Public Policy Issues in Economics

500

Internship

528

Labor Economics

534

Economic Sociology

540

Economics of Development

543

Applied Macro

546

Managerial Economics

548

Industrial Organization

549

Antitrust and Regulatory Economics

551

Economic Development of Latin America

552

European Economic Environment and Integration (Leuven)

559

Public Finance

561

Mathematical Economics

563

Econometric Models

580

International Economics

581

International Finance

582

Economic Integration Movements

Management

MGT

Course Title

218

Microcomputer Business Applications

240

Management of Information

347

System Analysis

375

The Business of Music

423

Management-Theory and Practice

426

Financial Management

431

Database Management

444

Management of Personal Finance

450

Directed Study in Management Information Systems

451

Management Seminar-Senior

491

Issues in Financial Management

492

Trends and Issues in Human Resource Management

500

Internship

501

Ethics in Business and Economics

510

Leadership and Organization

511 Organizational Behavior

521

Business Law I

522

Business Law II: Business Organizations and Property Rights

527

Human Resource Information Systems and Communications

529

Financial Management/Health Care Resources

530

Management of Human Resources

532

Investment Analysis

534

Corporate Finance I

536

Corporate Finance II

538

Options and Futures

542

Financial Markets and Institutions

543

Labor-Management Relations

545

Marketing Management

546

Market Research

547

Consumer Behavior

555

Financial Statement Analysis

556

Services Marketing

557

Marketing Strategy

558

Marketing and Community

559

Direct Response Marketing

560

Business and Ecommerce Management

562

International Marketing

564

Benefits and Compensation

565

Quantitative Methods in Decision Making

571

Government and Business

572

Entrepreneurship and Capital Venturing

573

Global and Strategic Human Resource Management

575

Business Strategy

584

International Banking and Financial Markets

589

International Corporate Finance

590

International Business

591

International Management

593

Portfolio Management

 

Program in Chemical Physics

An undergraduate major designed to meet the increasing need for scientists with strong backgrounds in both chemistry and physics, the chemical physics program is administered by an interdepartmental committee (chemistry and physics). Further information can be obtained from the chair of the Department of Chemistry or the Department of Physics.

Prerequisites. CHEM 103, 113, 104, 114, 203, 213; PHYS 215, 216, 225, 226, 506; MATH 121, 122, 221, 222.

Required. CHEM 351, 352, 501; PHYS 535, 536; CHEM 535, 536, or PHYS 531, 532, PHYS 511 or MATH 511, PHYS 512 or MATH 512, two physics seminars - PHYS 451 and 452; four additional courses in science or mathematics that must be approved by the advisor.

Majors are encouraged to participate in the ongoing chemical physics research at the university.

 

Department of Chemistry

Department of Chemistry

Professors

Aaron Barkatt; Greg Brewer, Chair; Diane Bunce; Ildiko M. Kovach; Irene Slagle

Professor Emeritus

Leopold May

Associate Professor

Vadim Knyazev

Adjunct Associate Professor

Cynthia Brewer

Research Assistant Professor

Mohammad Adel-Hadadi

 

The Department of Chemistry offers several programs that lead to the B.A. or B.S. degree. The curricula are designed to prepare the student for a career in industry, for admission to a graduate program in chemistry or biochemistry, or for admission to medical school.

Prerequisites. CHEM 103, 113, 104 (or 108), 114, 203, 213, 204, 214; PHYS 205 or 215, 225, 206 or 216, 226; MATH 111 or 121, 112 or 122. Minimum grade requirements for acceptance as a major are a C- average in each chemistry course, a C- average in each physics course, and a C- average in each mathematics course.

B.S. in Chemistry

This option, certified by the American Chemical Society, is designed to prepare students for graduate study or for employment as practicing chemists.

Required. CHEM 311, 351, 352, 353, 501, 505, 508, 518, 571, an approved CHEM elective; MATH 114 or a MATH above the 100 level; four additional courses in science or mathematics that must be approved by the advisor. The minimum grade requirement for these courses is a C-.

B.A., B.S. in Biochemistry (see Biochemistry)

The B.A. and B.S. programs are administered by an interdisciplinary committee made up of professors from the departments of biology and chemistry.

B.S. in Chemical Physics (see Chemical Physics)

This interdisciplinary major is administered jointly by the departments of chemistry and physics.

B.S. in Environmental Chemistry

For students interested in environmental issues, this option emphasizes environmental chemistry and related topics.

Required. CHEM 311, 317, 318, 351, 353, 505, 508, 518, 571; MATH 114; BIOL 105, 106, 549; CE 102, 555; ENGR 538. The minimum grade requirement for these courses is a C-.

Four-Year B.S./M.S. Program

For students with exceptional aptitude and some advanced placement credits, this program offers the opportunity to complete the requirements for the M.S. degree simultaneously with the B.S.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

CHEM

Course Title

103, 104

General Chemistry I, II (3,3)

107, 108

General Chemistry for Engineers I, II (3,3)

109 General, Organic, and Biochemistry for the Health Sciences (3)

113, 114

General Chemistry Laboratory I, II (2,2)

119 General,Organic, and Biochemistry for the Health Sciences Laboratory (1)

125

Chemistry in Our Lives (3)

126

Chemistry in Modern Times (3)

202

Science Under Oath (3)

203, 204

Organic Chemistry I, II (3,3)

213, 214

Organic Chemistry Laboratory I, II (2,2)

311

Analytical Chemistry (5)

317

Principles of Environmental Science (3)

318

Seminar in Environmental Science (1)

351, 352

Physical Chemistry I, II (3,3)

353

Physical Chemistry Laboratory (2)

395

Materials Science and Engineering (2)

491, 492

Undergraduate Research (3,3)

501

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry (3)

502

Bioinorganic Chemistry (3)

503

Survey of Organic Reactions (3)

504

Mechanistic Chemistry (3)

505 Scientific Literature and Technical Writing (3)

508

Instrumental Analysis and Chemical Spectroscopy (3)

518

Chemical Instrumentation Laboratory (3)

525, 526

Synthetic Organic Chemistry I, II (3,3)

530

Chemical Thermodynamics (3)

532

Symmetry and Chemical Bonding in Solids and on Surfaces (3)

534

Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics (3)

535

Introductory Quantum Chemistry (3)

536

Advanced Quantum Chemistry (3)

538

Introduction to Environmental Engineering (3)

540

Chemistry of Materials (3)

542

Environmental Chemistry Lab (3)

545

Introduction to Molecular Modeling and Computational Chemistry (3)

571, 572

Biochemistry I, II (4,4)

591

Research Seminar (1)

592

Research Seminar (1)

593

Readings in Chemical Education (3)

596

Biochemical Techniques (4)

Department of Drama

Professor

Thomas F. Donahue

Professor Emeritus

Gary J. Williams

Associate Professors

Gail Beach, Chair; Gary Sloan; Patrick Tuite

Assistant Professors

Marietta Hedges; K. Jon Klein; Eleanor Holdridge (visiting)

Lecturers

Susan Cohen; Dodi DiSanto; Melissa Flaim; Rosalind Flynn; Robb Hunter; Paul Morella; Thomas Morra; Sybil Roberts; Christopher Swanson; Paata Tsikurishvili

Web address

http://drama.cua.edu

The goal of the Department of Drama is to offer opportunities for intellectual growth and cultural enrichment and for the development of imaginative, disciplined expression in the theater. It seeks to provide undergraduates with practical skills in their respective fields and a sound knowledge of the history and literature of the theater. The faculty is committed to providing both productions and academic programs of high quality, believing that each enriches the other.

The undergraduate program leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree, the goal of the Department of Drama being to offer study and training in the theater within the full curriculum of a liberal arts education. This program differs from conservatory type training.

The Bachelor of Arts program in drama consists of 10 required courses (101, 104, 201, 202, 206, 207, 305, 306, 312, 451) and four electives, chosen from among the other courses listed below. Students declaring an interest in majoring in drama are required to take two courses in history and a course in Shakespeare among their distribution courses.

Students majoring in drama are required to earn 240 crew hours by working on approved department productions. A crew credit is earned by working satisfactorily for a minimum of 60 clock hours on one or more approved productions on set construction, costume construction, light, sound, property, running or house crews. Transfer students must earn one crew credit for each year in the drama program. Complete regulations are available from the Department of Drama.

A student must repeat any major course in which the grade awarded is below C-.

In sum, to graduate with a major in drama, the student must have completed 14 drama courses (10 required courses plus four drama electives) and have fulfilled his or her crew credits. To be admitted to the comprehensive examinations, students must have completed or be in the process of completing all required drama courses and crew credits. Comprehensives are normally taken in the second semester of the senior year.

The department offers a minor to students in other departments. The drama minor requires six courses: 101, 104, 206; two courses from 201, 202, or 305; one course from 207, 312, or 565.

Drama minors may follow a joint program in the Department of Education that leads to certification for teaching drama at the secondary level. This entails eleven required drama courses, three drama electives, and 21 hours of education courses. The latter includes a practice teaching segment, normally done in the first semester of the senior year. Early planning is important for this option.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

DR

Course Title

101, 104

Theatre I, II

102

Introduction to the Alexander Technique

201, 202

Theatre Topics

205

Introduction to Speech Communications

206, 415

Acting I, II

207

Introduction to Design

300

Performance 300

305

Theatre Topics III

306

Theatre Production

307

Speech for the Actor

312

Directing I

320

Improvisation Workshop

341

Costume Construction

403

Public Speaking

407

Advanced Speech for the Actor: Dialects

451

Coordinating Seminar

505

Acting III

507

Drama Beyond the Theatre

524

Acting/Directing Workshop

526

Teaching Theatre

540

Scene Design

541

Scene Painting

543

Stage Lighting

549

Introduction to Costume Design

566

Playwriting I

566

Screenwriting

570

Theatre Internship

Department of Education

Professors

John J. Convey, St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Chair; Shavaun Wall, Associate Vice President for Academic Planning; Frank R. Yekovich, Euphemia Lofton Haynes Chair

Professors Emeriti

Rev. Harold A. Buetow, Sarah Pickert

Associate Professors

Thomas J. Long; Merylann J. Schuttloffel, Chair

Associate Professor for Professional Practice

Joan Thompson

Assistant Professors

Joy Banks; Rona Frederick; Agnes Cave; Kathleen Perencevich; Mona Shevlin

Research Associate Professor

Carole W. Brown

Visiting Assistant Professor Diyu Chen

Research Assistant Professor

Leonard DeFiore, Brother Patrick Ellis Chair

Director of Teacher Education

Agnes Cave

Director of Field Experiences

Elsie Neely

Clinical Associate Andrea Sobel

The Department of Education, a scholarly community of faculty and students, shares in the general mission of The Catholic University of America. Through instruction, research and service, the department contributes to knowledge and practice in education and prepares graduates to assist in the academic, personal and social development of students. The department prepares teachers and other practitioners to work in Catholic, private, and public schools and other settings. It is the governing unit for the accredited education programs. The faculty of the Department of Education, the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music, and the School of Library and Information Science provide the professional education courses in early childhood, elementary, secondary and music education and school library media services. The Council on Teacher Education is the advisory board for the department.

The governing objectives of all teacher education programs are:

  1. knowledge of educational goals and values and their social/historical roots;
  2. competence in the content areas of specialization and in the other fields of knowledge pertinent to the individual program;
  3. understanding of the social, emotional, intellectual, and physical needs of children;
  4. skill in selecting and using appropriate teaching methods and instructional materials;
  5. development of effective strategies for evaluating student learning and growth;
  6. development of a reflective capacity for continual reappraisal of one's teaching philosophy, objectives, methods and materials.

Teacher education candidates are expected to have a thorough understanding of students, school context, and subject matter, and the ability to make informed decisions about teaching issues. See the Teacher Education Handbook for further information.

Teacher Education Program

The overall purpose of teacher education at The Catholic University of America is to help candidates acquire the knowledge, skills, dispositions, and reflective qualities essential for the professional practice of teaching. By developing a reflective, problem-solving orientation toward teaching, graduates of this program are empowered to examine critically their own actions and the context of these actions for the purpose of a more deliberative mode of professional activity. The outcome should be self-directed teachers who use professional knowledge to actively, persistently, and carefully improve their practice.

A program of studies in education includes the basic general education and professional courses required by the certifying authorities of most states. It is designed to provide candidates with opportunities for study in the liberal arts and sciences, educational foundations, learning theories, and teaching methods with internship experiences across a four-year sequence. Attention is also given to curricular and instructional strategies for exceptional students and students in varied cultural settings, as well as to increased demand for technology integration.

The early childhood, elementary, and secondary education programs offer candidates the opportunity to acquire essential knowledge, skills, and dispositions for beginning teachers. Candidates who plan to teach children in preschool, kindergarten, or grades one through three should major in early childhood education. Candidates who plan to teach grades one through six should major in elementary education. Elementary education majors may choose to minor in a subject area such as history, math, or science. Joint programs in secondary education are offered in art, drama, English, French, German, history, mathematics, and Spanish. Consult the Department of Education and the department in which you wish to specialize for information about specific programs. Students from other majors may also minor in early childhood, elementary and secondary education.

The B.A. programs in early childhood, elementary, and secondary education provide coursework leading to state teaching licenses. Completing a teacher preparation program does not automatically certify a teacher. A formal application to each state in which a candidate wants to be licensed has to be made and testing, such as the Praxis, may be required.

Students may minor in secondary education with an option to complete a one-year M.A. program in teacher education. Students may also pursue teaching certification in music education. (Contact the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music for further information.)

The Teacher Education Unit is accredited by the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) dating from 1975. The following programs have received national recognition by the specialty professional associations: early childhood education, elementary education, and most secondary education programs.

Early Childhood and Elementary Education

  • General education requirements (philosophy, theology and religious studies, humanities, language/literature, behavioral/social sciences, math/natural sciences).
  • A sequence of education courses (for early childhood: 590, 567-569; for elementary: 590-593) including a full-time, 14-week student teaching assignment during the senior year. Application to the director of teacher education must be made in the second week of the semester prior to student teaching. Candidates may not take more than one other course while student teaching.

Secondary Education

  • General education requirements (philosophy, theology and religious studies, humanities, language/literature, behavioral/social sciences, math/natural sciences).
  • An approved 10-course sequence (minimum) in a content area. See respective departments.
  • A minimum of four education courses are required in an approved sequence: 251, 361, 586, and content methods. EDUC 582 Reading in the Content Areas is required for English and social studies majors and encouraged for all other candidates. Practicum experience is required with methods courses.
  • A full-time, 14-week student teaching assignment (EDUC 597, 598, 599) occurs during the senior year. Application to the director of teacher education must be made in the second week of the semester prior to student teaching. Candidates may not take more than one other course while student teaching.

Initial Acceptance to the Teacher Education Program

  • Completion of the Teacher Education Application and submission of essay by April 1 of the sophomore year.
  • A 2.5 cumulative grade point average.
  • A 2.75 GPA in the major. For secondary education candidates, the GPA is based on major requirements and any additional courses required for licensure.
  • Two education faculty letters of recommendation (from sophomore level education faculty). For secondary education candidates, a letter of recommendation from the major department is required.
  • A passing score on each part of the Praxis I tests in reading (172), writing (171), mathematics (174) and a composite score of 527.
  • Successful completion of specified requirements such as key assessments and various assignments during field experiences (tutoring journals and observation papers).
  • If almost all the admission requirements are met, the Teacher Education Committee may allow the candidate to enter the program on a provisional status for one semester. If the candidate does not meet all the requirements by the end of the provisional semester, the candidate will be denied admission.

Continuance or Application for Student Teaching

  • A 2.5 cumulative grade point average and a 2.75 in the major in every semester. If the candidate's GPA drops below the established minimum of 2.5 cumulative and 2.75 in the major after admission to Teacher Education, the candidate will be placed on probation for one semester in which time the candidate must attain the required GPA's. Candidates cannot student teach without attaining the required GPAs. Also, approval to student teach is not automatically granted upon completion of academic requirements. If weaknesses or deficiencies are noted in subject matter knowledge, pedagogy, communications, interpersonal skills or dispositions, the director of teacher education may put the candidate on probation and require the candidate to take additional coursework, do an additional practicum or obtain personal counseling. Each candidate is allowed to have only one provisional and one probationary semester.
  • Elementary and secondary education candidates must take PRAXIS II content test before student teaching.
  • Successful completion of specified requirements such as key assessments and various assignments during field experiences (lesson plans, thematic unit, mini Action Research Project, and satisfactory grades in methods courses). A C- minimum is required for all education courses as well as general education/ distribution requirements to be eligible for a license.

Graduation

  • A grade of at least C- in each course required for licensure. Successful completion of the Teacher Education program (i.e., education courses, courses in the major, and courses related to the major).
  • Successful completion of specified requirements such as key assessments and various assignments during field experiences (Action Research Paper, student teaching evaluation).

Licensure

  • Completion of Electronic Portfolio, EP. The EP is also presented to Education faculty.
  • Completion and submission of the District of Columbia Application for Licensure Form, criminal background check and DC application fee.
  • Passing scores on both content and pedagogy PRAXIS II tests (#0012 Elementary Education: Content Area Exercises and #0014 Elementary Education: Content Knowledge). Secondary education candidates should see the Coordinator of Secondary Education for Praxis II requirements.

Transportation Responsibility

Transportation to and from agencies or schools used for practicum, field experiences, and student teaching is the personal responsibility of the candidate.

Education Studies Program

This program does not lead to a teaching license. Instead, it provides majors in Education Studies the skills they need for employment in a variety of settings. These settings include local, state or federal government education positions; industry and/or trade association education positions; or education positions in hospitals, museums, foundations, professional associations, or charitable organizations. This is the most flexible undergraduate major offered by the Department of Education at the Catholic University of America. Programs of study are designed by the candidate and the candidate's adviser to satisfy the wants of the candidate, and his or her hopes for employment upon graduation.

The Education Studies Program informs majors who want to work with or for children in nonschool settings. It prepares majors to understand the ways schools function and to gain firsthand knowledge of how outside agencies may enhance or impede the work of schools. Candidates majoring in education studies gain knowledge enabling them to be informed citizens and parents who understand how to interact constructively with schools. Through its several foci, this program may also teach majors how to enter, manage, or begin businesses related to education; how to design educational products; or how to obtain employment in educationally related mass media, including public relations, advertising, or print journalism. Education Studies majors can also focus on education issues relevant to the workplace or the United States justice system or those of concern to special populations.

Each major's program must be approved by the coordinator of Education Studies; every program will contain at least one special focus. Advising about focus and course selection will take into consideration the candidate's personal needs and career goals. Usually, candidates enroll in one or more semesters of practicum or internship that serves to draw together their coursework in a culminating experience that serves to acquaint the candidate with the real world of work.

In order to be accepted as an Education Studies major, candidates must have at least a 2.3 cumulative average and must apply to and be accepted by the School of Arts and Sciences with the approval of the Department of Education. Application forms for admission to this program are obtained from the department. Candidates whose grade point average falls below 2.0 may be dropped from this major.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

EDUC

Course Title

101

Introduction to Teaching (1 cr.)

251

Foundations of Education

261

Human Growth and Development

351

Teaching Early Childhood and Elementary Science, Health, and Physical Education

361

Psychology of Education

464

Modern Japan

498

Independent Study

503

Human Relations and Interpersonal Communication

522

Race, Class, Gender, and Disability in Education

525

Psychology of Learning-Diverse Populations

530

Language and Literacy in Multicultural Contexts

541

Mental Health Principles

554

Instructional Design

555

Classroom Management for Regular and Special Needs Children

556

Practicum in Early Childhood and Elementary Education

557

Advanced Practicum in Secondary Education

560

Practicum in Non-school Educational Settings

561, 562

Practicum in Early Childhood/Elementary Education (1,1)

563

Internship in Non-school Setting II

564, 565

Practicum in Secondary Education (1,1)

567 - 569

Supervised Internship and Seminar: Early Childhood (4,4,4)

570

Curriculum and Instruction in Early Childhood and Elementary School

571

Teaching Early Childhood and Elementary School Social Studies

574

Methods and Materials in Modern Elementary Mathematics

576

Children's Literature in Curriculum

577

Reading and Lang Arts in the Elementary School

578

International and Multicultural Education

580

Teaching English in Secondary Schools

581

Educating Diverse Learners

582

Reading in the Content Areas: Learning to Learn from Text

583

Models in Early Childhood Education

584

Curriculum and Strategies in Early Child Education

585

Teaching High School Social Studies

586

Curriculum and Methods in Adolescent Education

590

Reflective Teaching Tutorial (1 cr.)

591 - 593

Student Teaching and Seminar: Elementary (4 cr. each)

594

Independent Study (1 cr.)

595, 596

Independent Study

597 - 599

Supervised Internship and Seminary: Secondary Education (4 cr. each)

 

Department of English Language and Literature

Professors

Glen M. Johnson; Virgil Nemoianu; Ernest Suarez, Chair; Christopher J. Wheatley; Stephen K. Wright

Professors Emeriti

E. Catherine Dunn; Jean Dietz Moss; Sister Anne O'Donnell; Joseph M. Sendry

Associate Professors

Tobias Gregory, Director of Graduate Studies,; Michael Mack, Director of University Honors Program; Rosemary Winslow

Assistant Professors

Lilla Kopár; Rebecca Rainof Mas

Clinical Assistant Professors

Daniel Gibbons, Director of Undergraduate Studies; Todd Lidh; Taryn Okuma; Pamela S. Ward

Lecturer

Anca Nemoianu

The major in the Department of English centers on the study of literature as the focal point of a liberal education. To encounter some of the best writing in English is to engage some of the most significant operations of the language itself, as well as to trace the development of traditions in thought and expression that link us to the past and guide us into the future. Core courses for the major provide extensive reading in the history of English and American literature, at least two literary genres (in the junior reading courses), and the work of a major author (in the senior seminar). The departmental faculty seeks to develop in the student a progressively more differentiated sense of literary history, a more discriminating sense of literary value, and a more sophisticated understanding of the cultural and social roles of literature. At the same time they strive to make students aware that literature, while a strenuous test for the intellect, is also a deeply satisfying, lasting source of enjoyment.

Increased sensitivity to literature is inevitably accompanied by increased sensitivity to language. To bring students maximum benefit from this reciprocal growth, the department systematically cultivates their powers of written expression. Writing and learning, language and thought, are linked not only in courses explicitly devoted to composition and rhetoric but also in the core literature courses required of all English majors, where the essay becomes a principal means for exploring and developing ideas.

Besides a mind well nurtured and well informed, the English major can expect to leave college with distinct advantages in approaching a career. Those most directly related to the undergraduate study of English include teaching at the secondary level or (after graduate study) the college and university levels and work in fields such as editing, publishing or writing. But because a broad cultural background and a command of clearly conceptualized, well-written prose are increasingly valued as preparation for advanced professional studies-as, for example, those in law or business-and indeed for the professions themselves, the study of English is a promising point of entry to a variety of careers.

Required. 231 and 232; two courses from the group 331, 332, and 333; 351 or 352; 431 and 432; 461 or 462; and four other upper-division courses in English or American language and literature. Besides courses in English and American language and literature numbered 300 and above, two of the following courses carrying lower numbers may be used to fulfill part of the requirement for "four upper-division courses": ENG 235 and 236 (American Literature) and HSHU 102, 203, and 204 (University Honors). One upper-division course in writing (e.g., ENG 301, 302, 326, 327) may be included among the courses for the major. ENG 331, 332, 333, 431, and 432 are open only to English major.

For acceptance as an English major by the junior year, a minimum average of 2.5 is required in 231 and 232. Majors who have received a grade of C or lower in a 100-level writing course (101, 103, 105) are required to include among their upper-division English offerings a course in expository or argumentative writing (326 or 327).

English majors are required to pass a comprehensive examination given in the second (spring) semester of senior year. Details are available from the undergraduate adviser.

Six courses are required for a minor in English: 231, 232, and four other courses at the level of 300 or above, no more than one of which may be in writing; 235 and 236 may be counted among the four other courses.

An interdisciplinary minor in rhetoric and writing is offered for students whose major is outside the Department of English. For details see Dr. Stephen McKenna, Department of Media Studies.

In collaboration with the Department of Education, English majors may follow a joint program in secondary education as preparation for teaching English at the high school level. English majors who wish to avail themselves of this choice should consult the undergraduate advisers for both departments as soon as possible in their undergraduate careers, so as to ensure that they leave room in their schedules for all the required courses in both fields. Special attention should be paid to the regulations of the two departments where courses in writing are concerned. See also the Department of Education section of these Announcements.

The Thomas O'Hagan Prize of $100 is offered for the best poem written by an undergraduate in a competition held during the second semester of each academic year. Details on this prize are available from the Department of English.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

ENG

Course Title

101

Rhetoric and Composition

102

Composition and Literature

103

English Composition for International Students

104

Literature and Composition for International Students

105

Honors Composition Seminar

111

Rhetoric and Composition

201

Form and Value in Poetry

202

Elements of Drama

203

Varieties of the Modern Novel

205

The Literature of Fantasy

208

Highlights of Irish Literature

209

Studies in Short Fiction

231, 232

The History of English Lit I, II

235, 236

American Literature I, II

301

Creative Writing: Fiction

302

Creative Writing: Poetry

311

Greek and Roman Mythology

312 Norse Mythology

324

Introduction to Linguistics

325

Contemporary English Grammar

326

Workshop: Writing Improvement

327

Argumentative Writing

331

Intensive Readings: Lyric

332

Intensive Readings: Drama

333

Intensive Readings: Narrative

341

The World of the Anglo-Saxons

345

Epic Tradition From Homer to Joyce

351, 352

Chaucer and His Age I, II

355 Lincoln in Literature and Film

356

Arthurian Literature

364

Milton

369

Renaissance Poetry

371

Readings in 18th Century English Literature

372

Restoration and 18th Century Drama

373 19th Century British Literature
374 20th Century British Literature

375

On the Road: A Journey into the Literature and Music of the American South

376

Theatre Topics

377 Fiction and Film: 19th Century Adaptations

381

Poetry and Rock in the Age of Dickey and Dylan

383

Children's Literature

384

Short Fiction by Women

385

Literature of the Family

386

British Women Novelists

387

American Women Novelists

388

American Women Writers

389

American Literature and Culture since 1945

390

Literature of the American South

391

Highlights of African-American Literature

397

Modern American Poetry

398

Contemporary American Novel

399

Modern American Drama

430

Art of Rhetoric

431, 432

Coordinating Seminar I, II

451 Film Narrative: Hitchcock
453 American Film Comedy
455 Crime Film and Literature

461, 462

Plays of Shakespeare I, II

464

Modern Japan

501, 502

Introduction to Old English I, II

503

Beowulf

520

American Political Rhetoric

524

The Rhetoric of Advertising

526

Workshop: Writing Improvement

530

The Rhetoric of Propaganda

541

Irish Women Writers

565

Renaissance Drama

570

Seminar: Contemporary Irish Society

573

Irish Drama-17th and 18th Century

583

The Modern Irish Short Story

585

Women in Modern Irish Literature

586

Irish Poetry After Yeats

587

Modern Irish Drama

588

Contemporary Irish Drama

589

American Tradition in Poetry

592

Modern American Drama

595, 596

Independent Study

Department of Greek and Latin

Professors

Frank A.C. Mantello; William E. Klingshirn, Chair

Professor Emeritus

Rev. Thomas P. Halton

Associate Professors

William J. McCarthy; John F. Petruccione

Assistant Professor

Sarah Brown Ferrario

Adjunct Associate Professor

Sabine Albersmeier

Web site

http://greeklatin.cua.edu

The Department of Greek and Latin provides students with opportunities to study the world of antiquity and to acquire a broad understanding of Greece and Rome within the context of Western civilization. It offers courses in Greek and Latin language and literature and in various aspects of classical culture. Students are encouraged to pursue an interdisciplinary approach. In their search for an intimate understanding of the ancient Greeks and Romans and their society, specialists will wish to read and study what they wrote as they wrote it. But students who are interested in Western culture and its foundations in the classical world are encouraged to avail themselves of those departmental courses that do not presuppose or require knowledge of either Greek or Latin. These "non-language" courses, listed below under the rubric "Classics," make use of modern translations of basic writings and documents to permit non-majors to study classical literature, mythology, history, arts, and culture.

A classical education has always been highly esteemed, and is frequently recommended to those who intend to pursue careers in any of the professions such as law or politics or to proceed to graduate school. The department's programs have been designed not only to provide an excellent preparation for a professional career, but also to meet the needs of students who wish to work toward graduate degrees in the field of classical studies. They value their practical mastery of one or both of the world's most influential languages and literatures, as well as the habits of firm, critical judgment; precise and articulate expression; and intelligent, responsible reflection that derive from the careful and dedicated study of the sources of our Western literary, philosophical, and artistic civilization.

Major Programs

Classics (Greek and Latin)

This major emphasizes competence in both ancient languages. It consists of six or seven courses in Greek, six or seven in Latin, and four in ancient history and art history, and requires in the senior year a thesis and translation examinations in both languages based on a reading list of selected primary works.

Prerequisites. Elementary Greek (GR 101-102) and Latin (LAT 101-102) or the equivalent.

Required. Intermediate Greek (GR 103-104) or two Greek electives beyond 104, Greek 465 (Advanced Greek Seminar), GR 511 (Greek Prose Composition), and two other courses in Greek authors; Intermediate Latin (LAT 103-104) or two Latin electives beyond 104, LAT 465 (Advanced Latin Seminar), LAT 511 (Latin Prose Composition), and two other courses in Latin authors; one Greek or Latin elective; CLAS 205-206 (History of the Ancient Mediterranean I and II), CLAS 317-318 (Greek and Roman Art and Architecture), CLAS 425 (Senior Tutorial), and CLAS 426 (Senior Thesis).

Classical Humanities

This major allows two options: Greek or Latin. The Greek option requires competence in Greek and selected areas of classical civilization. The Latin option requires competence in Latin and selected areas of classical civilization. Both options allow for the possibility of studying the other language through at least the intermediate level and both require a senior thesis and a translation examination based on a reading list of selected primary works.

Greek option:

Prerequisite. Elementary Greek (GR 101-102).

Required. Intermediate Greek (GR 103-104) or two Greek electives beyond 104, GR 465 (Advanced Greek Seminar), GR 511 (Greek Prose Composition), and two courses in Greek authors; CLAS 205-206 (History of the Ancient Mediterranean I and II), CLAS 313 (Roman Literature in Translation), CLAS 317-318 (Greek and Roman Art and Architecture), CLAS 425 (Senior Tutorial), and CLAS 426 (Senior Thesis); and four additional courses approved by the department's undergraduate adviser, either in the other classical language or in a cognate field.

Latin option:

Prerequisite. Elementary Latin (LAT 101-102).

Required. Intermediate Latin (LAT 103-104) or two Latin electives beyond 104, LAT 465 (Advanced Latin Seminar), LAT 511 (Latin Prose Composition), and two courses in Latin authors; CLAS 205-206 (History of the Ancient Mediterranean I and II), CLAS 312 (Greek Literature in Translation), CLAS 317-318 (Greek and Roman Art and Architecture), CLAS 425 (Senior Tutorial), and CLAS 426 (Senior Thesis); and four additional courses approved by the department's undergraduate adviser, either in the other classical language or in a cognate field. Students who wish to teach Latin and classical antiquity at the high school level may complete this major and the minor in secondary education offered by CUA's Department of Education.

Classical Civilization

This major makes the systematic study of classical civilization accessible to students who do not wish to major in the Greek and/or Latin languages. It is an interdisciplinary program that focuses on the history, thought, and culture of the ancient Mediterranean world from the Bronze Age to the rise of Islam. The program requires students to examine the ancient Mediterranean from a variety of perspectives: literary, historical, and art-historical. By studying the cultures of Greece and Rome from diverse points of view, students will be able to place these in wider geographical, sociological, and cultural contexts. This major thus offers students the opportunity to examine in their totality civilizations that are not only intrinsically interesting, but have left an indelible imprint on the modern world.

Prerequisites. None. Majors are strongly encouraged to fulfill their language requirement in Greek or Latin and to take Greek or Latin courses beyond the 102 level, but they are not required to do so.

Required. The program begins with seven required core courses in ancient history (CLAS 205, 206), Classical literature in translation (CLAS 312, 313), Greek and Roman art and architecture (CLAS 317, 318), and Classical mythology (CLAS 211), plus CLAS 425-426 (Senior Tutorial and Senior Thesis). The four remaining courses may be chosen from among the "Classics" offerings of the department and, with the undergraduate adviser's approval, from courses offered by other departments. Up to three of these four courses may be approved Greek and/or Latin courses beyond the 102 level. A final written examination on classical literature and history and a senior thesis are required.

Minor Programs

  1. Minor in Greek: GR 103, 104; four other courses in Greek beyond the 104 level.
  2. Minor in Latin: LAT 103, 104; four other courses in Latin beyond the 104 level.
  3. Minor in Classical Civilization: Any six approved courses chosen from among the "Classics" courses of the department; one or two Greek and/or Latin courses beyond the 102 level may be substituted for one or two of the classics courses.

Foreign Language Requirement

The foreign language requirement for degrees in the School of Arts & Sciences may be fulfilled by satisfactorily completing the intermediate level (103-104, 516-517, or 519) in Greek or Latin. Depending on placement, elementary-level language courses may be required to reach the intermediate level. Elementary language courses are numbered 101 and 102 and count as free electives only. GR 509 and LAT 509 are 6-credit accelerated equivalents to 101-102 that can serve as prerequisites to the 103 level in each language; GR 509 and LAT 509 are open to undergraduates with departmental permission and, as elementary-level courses, count as free electives and do not fulfill the foreign language requirement. In addition to placement, a prerequisite for advancement to 102, 103, and 104 is a minimum grade of C- in the previous course in the sequence.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site http://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

Courses listed under the rubric "Classics" do not presuppose or require knowledge of either the Greek or Latin language. All may be used to satisfy the humanities requirement for the B.A. degree. CLAS 205, 206, 572, and other courses in ancient history also may be used to satisfy the social science requirement. CLAS 211, 312, 313, and other Greek and Roman literature courses in translation may be used to satisfy either the literature or the humanities requirement. For prerequisites, consult the department chair.

Classics

CLAS

Course Title

205

History of the Ancient Mediterranean I

206 History of the Ancient Mediterranean II

211

Greek and Roman Mythology

215 Ancient Heroic Poetry

224

Etymology

251

Ancient World in Cinema

300

Greek Tragedy and Opera

302

Greek and Roman Religion

305

The Roman Family

309 Art and Archaeology of Bronze Age Greece

312

Greek Literature in Translation

313

Roman Literature in Translation

317

Greek Art and Architecture

318

Roman Art and Architecture

325

Archaeology of Ancient Life

425

Senior Tutorial

426

Senior Thesis

546

Augustan Rome

560

Greek Art and Architecture

561

Roman Art and Architecture

562 Directed Reading

564-566

Topics in Ancient History/Culture

567, 568

History of Ancient Mediterranean I, II

572

Mediterranean World of Late Antiquity

594, 595

Topics in Classical Literature

596

Independent Study

597

Directed Research

598

Directed Research

Greek

GR

Course Title

101, 102

Elementary Greek I, II

103, 104

Intermediate Greek I, II

465

Advanced Greek Seminar

509

Intensive Elementary Greek

510

Readings in Greek Prose

511

Greek Prose Composition

512

Advanced Grammar and Prose Style

515

Greek Historiography

516 Intensive Intermediate Greek I
517 Intensive Intermediate Greek II

518

Greek Tragedy

519

Intensive Intermediate Greek

528

Greek Lyric

529

Greek Choral Lyric

532

Greek Comedy

535

Greek Epic

541

Introduction to Later Greek Language and Literature

548

Greek Pastoral

553

Greek Oratory

565-568

Directed Reading

576

Greek Philosophical Works

581

The Greek Novel

587

The Athenian Empire

594, 595

Topics in Greek Literature

596

Independent Study

597

Directed Research

598

Directed Research

Latin

LAT

Course Title

101, 102

Elementary Latin I, II

103, 104

Intermediate Latin I, II

465

Advanced Latin Seminar

501 Elementary Latin for Graduate Students I
502 Elementary Latin for Graduate Students II

509

Intensive Elementary Latin

510

Readings in Postclassical Latin

511

Latin Prose Composition

512

Advanced Grammar and Prose Style

515

Roman Historiography

516 Intensive Intermediate Latin I
517 Intensive Intermediate Latin II

519

Intensive Intermediate Latin

520

Roman Drama

528

Roman Lyric

529

Roman Elegy

530

Ovid

533

Virgil's Eclogues and Georgics

535

Latin Epic

548

Roman Pastoral

553

Roman Oratory

558

Roman Satire

561 Introduction to Medieval Latin Studies
562 Topics in Medieval Latin Studies

565 - 568

Directed Reading

576

Roman Philosophical Works

579

Roman Epistolography

581

The Roman Novel

587

The Roman Revolution

588

The Age of Nero

589

Christian Church in the Roman Empire

594, 595

Topics in Latin Literature

596

Independent Study

597

Directed Research

598

Directed Research

 

Department of History

Professors

Ronald S. Calinger; Nelson H. Minnich; Jerry Z. Muller, Chair; Lawrence R. Poos; Leslie Woodcock Tentler

Professors Emeriti

Uta-Renata Blumenthal; Maxwell H. Bloomfield; George T. Dennis; John E. Lynch; William A. Wallace

Associate Professors

Thomas Cohen; Katherine Ludwig Jansen; Laura E. Nym Mayhall; Timothy J. Meagher; Leonora A. Neville; James D. Riley; Stephen A. West

Assistant Professors

Jennifer R. Davis; Michael C. Kimmage; Caroline R. Sherman

Instructor

 

At every level of education today, teachers are under pressure to help students improve their understanding of modern society and their place within it and to deepen a sense of values. As M. Bloch observed, historians have always sought to provide their students and readers of history with a perspective on the development of the modern world. The serious problems of contemporary urban societies and of advanced or underdeveloped countries have led to a heightened study of history with a focus on elements of continuity, change and revolution, with their effects on the lives of nations and their international relations.

A major in history provides a useful preparation for careers in government service, business, journalism, law, library science, the ministry, and politics. The course offerings are geared to meet the needs and stimulate the interests of specialists and nonspecialists. With the exceptions noted, no prerequisites are required for admission to undergraduate courses.

The fields offered are Middle Ages, modern Europe, United States, and Latin America. A grade average of 2.5 in the required 200 level surveys is necessary for acceptance into the major. A major who intends to pursue history as a profession is urged to acquire competence in the foreign language(s) necessary to the chosen field: for example, Latin for medieval, French or German for modern Europe, Spanish or Portuguese for Latin America. The B.A./M.A. program is available to qualified students.

In collaboration with the Department of Education, history majors may follow a joint program in social studies/secondary education to prepare themselves to teach history at the high school level. History majors who wish to enter this program should consult the undergraduate advisers in both departments as soon as possible in their undergraduate studies, in order to make room in their schedules for all the required courses in both fields. See also the Department of Education section of these Announcements.

Major program

The history major requires a minimum of 11 courses in history. These include five core courses, which must ordinarily be taken in this order: two 200 level surveys (ideally taken in the freshman year); HIST 387 and 388 (Junior Seminar, in the junior year); and HIST 401 (Senior Thesis Seminar, in the first semester of the senior year).

In addition, every history major must take a minimum of six more elective courses in history. These six courses must be chosen according to the following rules. No more than four of the six courses can be in the same area of history (that is, United States, Latin America, Middle Ages, or modern Europe). At least two of the six courses must deal with "pre-modern" periods of history (before the era of the French Revolution for European history, before the era of the American Revolution for U.S. history, before the era of the revolutions for independence for Latin American history). The six courses should ordinarily be taken at the 300 level, but history majors may count a maximum of two 200 level courses (in addition to the two required core surveys) among the six electives within the major.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

HIST

Course Title

101

World Civilization to 1700

102

World Civilizations Since 1700

211

The Medieval World: Culture, War, Religion in the Middle Ages

216

Beyond the "Fall" of Rome

221

Early Modern Europe 1450-1750

222

Europe: 1720 -1871

223

Europe: 1848 -1918

257, 258

American History Survey I, II

281

Colonial Latin America

282

Modern Latin America

283

Latinos in America: 1848-1990

300

Age of Discovery: Iberian World

303

Medieval Society and Culture in the Early Middle Ages

304

Cultural History of Food in the Middle Ages

305

History of the Ancient Mediterranean

306

Women and Gender in Middle Ages, 500-1500

307

Comparative Colonial Systems, 1500-1800

308

History of Byzantium and the Creation of the Orthodox World, 500-1200

309

Islamic Origins

310

Religion and Society: Medieval Europe

311

The Crusades

312

Medieval Japan, Medieval Britain

313

Carolingian Society and Culture

314

History of the Ancient Mediterranean II

315

Crime in England, 1200-1800

316

England After the Black Death

317

Medieval Italy

318

Anglo-Saxon England

320

Gilded Culture and Progressive Politics: U.S., 1875-1920

322

English Society under the Tudors and Stuarts, 1485-1660

323

The Renaissance, 1300-1530

324

Medieval Pilgrimages

325

Europe in the Reformation Era, 1500-1648

326

Nineteenth-Century Britain

326A

Britain and the Second World War

327

Twentieth-Century Britain

329

History Of British Cinema

330

Religion, Magic, and Witchcraft, 1400 to the Present

331A

Early Modern Europe, 1450-1750

332

The French Revolution

333

Modern Japan

35

American Indian History

336

Women in Modern Europe

337

The Science of Man: Great Works of Modern Social Thoughts

338

Europe, 1945-1995

340, 341

Modern European Intellectual History I, II

345, 346

Imperial Austria I, II

348

America and the World

349

Washington: Symbol and City

350

Europe Since 1945

351

U.S., 1918-1948

352

U.S., 1949-1989

353

Era of Civil War and Reconstruction

355

Social History of the Early American Family

357

History of Old South 1607-1865

358

U.S. South Since the Civil War

359

Women in U.S. History: 1750-Present

360

U.S. Immigration and Ethnicity

361

War and Society Middle Ages

362

Nazism

364

Catholicism in America Since 1945

366

Devotionalism in U.S. Catholicism

367

Colonial North America

369

U.S. Civil Rights Movement, 1945-Present

371

Latin America: 20th Century

373

America in World Affairs: 1775-1898

374

Slavery in America

375

Revolutionary America, 1746-1880

378

Immigrants in America: 1820-1940

379

The Cold War: 1945-1975

380

The Irish in America

381

Border Culture: Mexico and the Southwestern United States, 1776-1930

382

World War II: Military and Diplomatic

383

Latin America and the United States

384

Race, Family, and Social Change in Latin America, 1800-1930

385

Culture and Society in Modern Latin America

386

Modern Mexico

387, 388

Junior Seminar

393

The Scientific Revolution

394

History of Modern Science and Medicine

399

Non-Western World: 1500-1900

401

Senior Thesis Seminar

409

From Empire to Kingdom: Romans and Barbarians in the Early Middle Ages

493

Internship

495

Independent Study

497, 498

Directed Readings

534

Modern Irish History

539

Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe and New England

540

Famine, Irish Immigrants, and their Children: A Case Study in Immigration

550

Reformation

551

Nationalism and Consequences in 20th Century

552

Modern European Intellectual History

568

History of European Cooperation (Leuven)

569

Europe: A Cultural Entity (Leuven)

571

Latin America: Culture and Politics

572

Church in Colonial Latin America

585

Religion and Society in 19th and 20th Century Latin America

Intensive English Program

Anca M. Nemoianu, Ph.D., Director

The Intensive English Program is for international students whose applications to the university need the support of further training in speaking, understanding, reading, and writing English.

While most courses in the program do not grant academic credit toward a degree, they can be counted towards the students' full-time status. Qualified students may also take coursework in an academic subject along with part-time study in the program.

The Intensive English Program follows the semester system of the university: courses are 14 weeks in duration. For full-time students, instruction is for an average of 18 hours per week. Each semester is preceded by a placement testing period. The placement testing fee is $40. All the classes in the Intensive English Program have limited enrollment. For more information about the program and the testing days preceding each semester, call 202-319-4439 or 5229.

The Intensive English Program issues I-20 forms necessary for obtaining a Student Visa (F-1). Students on an F-1 visa must be enrolled full time in the program.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

IENG

Course Title

30, 31

English Oral Skills-Workplace I, II

50

Language Lab

54

Basic Oral Communication

55

Basic Writing

56

Basic Grammar

70

ESL Independent Study

72, 75

ESL Writing I, II

73, 76

ESL Reading/Grammar I, II

74, 77

ESL Listening/Speaking I, II

79

ESL Reading/Writing

84

ESL: Listening I

86

ESL Reading/Grammar II

87

Basic Oral Communication

88

Basic Writing

89

Basic Grammar

90

Skills for Academic Study

91

ESL Grammar/Writing

92

ESL Conversation/Reading

93

ESL Reading/Writing

94

ESL Listening/Speaking

95

Pronunciation of American English

96

ESL Reading/Listening

97

Patterns of Spoken American English

99

ESL Independent Study

100

ESL Writing/Grammar

110

Listening/Speaking

111

Ecclesiastical English

112

Conversation

Program in Latin American and Latino Studies

Program Director: Mario Ortiz, Modern Languages and Literatures

The university offers an undergraduate minor in Latin American and Latino Studies, LALSP. The course of study in the minor program is designed to introduce students to the wide range of disciplines in LALSP, and to encourage students to pursue intensive studies in their particular fields of interest.

The program consists of three core courses and three electives, for a minimum of 18 credit hours. Students will select one core course from each of the following departments or schools: anthropology, history, modern languages, music, politics, and theology and religious studies. Major courses may not be used in the LALSP.

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

Core courses:

ANTH 371

Latin America in the New Millennium

ANTH 254/554

Ancient Cultures of South America

ANTH 355

Latinos and Latinas in the US

HIST 281

Colonial Latin America

HIST 282

Modern Latin America

HIST 283

Latinos in America

MUS 335

Survey of Latin American Music

POL 250

Introduction to Latin American Politics

SPAN 320/321

Translation

SPAN 410/411

Survey of Latin American Literature

TRS 326

Hispanic Catholicism

TRS 328

Makers of Hispanic Catholic History

TRS 370

Theologies of Liberation

TRS 374

Hispanic/Latino Theology and Spirituality

Elective courses:

Students may choose from a number of electives approved by the program. Currently approved courses include the following:

ANTH 217

Migrants, Refugees and the Homeless

ANTH 322

Lost Cities and Ancient Empires

ANTH 332/532

Andean Society and Culture

ANTH 508

Anthropology and Salvadoran Migration: Ethnology and Policy

ANTH 334/534

The Incas

HIST 370

Religion Politics and Society In Early Modern World

HIST 371

Latin America: 20th Century Revolutions

HIST 383

Latin America and U.S. History

HIST 384

Race Family, Social Change in Latin America 1800-1930

HIST 386

Modern Mexico

HIST 401

Explorers, Travelers, and Missionaries (1450-1800)

HIST 572

The Church Colonial Latin America

MUS 585

Latin American Music: Regional Studies

POL 490

Politics of Reconstruction and Reparation

POL 552/ SOC 561

Migration and Development in the Americas

POL 580

Grassroots Politics and Development in the Americas

SOC 309

Law and Society

SPAN 206

Topics in Latin American Culture

SPAN 310

Contemp. Latin Am. in Dialogue with the World

SPAN 380

Film, Culture and History

SPAN 550

Mexican Civilization

SPAN 570

Mexican Literature and Film

SSS 326

Diversity in a Multicultural Society

TRS 358

Mission Latin America

TRS 454

Intro. to Hispanic Ministry

 

 

Department of Mathematics

Professors

Kiran R. Bhutani; Alexander Levin; Boris Reichstein

Professors Emeriti

Victor M. Bogdan; Parfeny P. Saworotnow; Lawrence Somer

Associate Professors

Sherif El-Helaly, Chair; Paul G. Glenn; Guoyang Liu; Farzana McRae

Assistant Professors

Chisup Kim; Prasad Senesi; Vijay Sookdeo

Mathematics is the language of science and is an essential part of work done in the natural sciences, engineering, economics, and other areas. Since ancient times and in many civilizations, mathematics has been central in human thought and critical to many aspects of intellectual development and progress. The Department of Mathematics offers courses and degree programs reflecting the place and various roles of mathematics in modern civilization.

For students majoring in the humanities or the social sciences, the department offers MATH 168, 187, 110, 111, 112, and 114; 111 is a prerequisite for 112. Math 110 is open only to students majoring in Business and Economics.

For students in the natural sciences, engineering, or mathematics (and any student with an interest in and aptitude for mathematics), the department offers a sequence in calculus and differential equations: MATH 121, 122, 221, and 222.

Upon entering the university, all students whose major programs require calculus or precalculus must take a Mathematics Placement Test, which helps determine placement relative to the two calculus choices, MATH 111 and 121. Students who aim to take calculus but need additional preparation take either MATH 108 or 110 before calculus. (MATH 110 is open only to students majoring in Business and Economics).

There is a specific web page for mathematics placement.

Students who have prior coursework in calculus may obtain advanced placement in calculus by consulting the department. Students who have scored sufficiently high on the AB or BC Advanced Placement Test in Calculus should inquire about receiving course credit for MATH 121-122.

 

Mathematics Department web page

 

Degree Programs

The department offers four undergraduate degree programs: B.A. in mathematics, B.S. in mathematics, B.S. in mathematics/secondary education, and B.S. in mathematics/physics. Depending on their emphasis, the programs prepare students for graduate studies, for work in industry, or for teaching. Students interested in graduate studies in mathematics should consider taking MATH 520, 522, and 551. Students interested in applications of mathematics should also consider choosing from MATH 507, 515, 516, 527, 528, 531, 532, 533, 537, 540, 541, 561, 562, and 584. Students interested in industrial or applied mathematics careers should consider taking 531, 532, 537, 540, 561, and 562.

All mathematics degree programs require MATH 121, 122, 221, 222, and 305 (or placement out of these courses) and PHYS 215 and 216. Students are encouraged to include courses from mathematically related disciplines in addition to PHYS 215 and 216. Freshmen and sophomores who have obtained a 2.5 or better grade point average in 121, 122, 221, and 222 will be accepted into the program. An average of at least 2.0 in the upper-level (500 and above) courses is required for graduation.

Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics

Required mathematics courses. The calculus sequence (121, 122, 221, 222); MATH 305, 501, 505, 506, 521, 524; and three mathematics electives at the 500-level, chosen with departmental approval. Also, PHYS 215 and 216.

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

Required mathematics courses. The calculus sequence (121, 122, 221, 222); MATH 305, 501, 505, 506, 521, 524; and three mathematics electives at the 500-level, chosen with departmental approval. Also, PHYS 215 and 216, CSC 123, and 124, and four other courses in computer science, natural sciences, or mathematics, chosen with departmental approval.

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics and Secondary Education

This program is designed for those who plan a career in teaching math at the secondary level. Interested students should consult the undergraduate advisers in both the departments of mathematics and education early in the major in order to plan a schedule of required courses from both fields.

Required mathematics courses. 121, 122, 221, 222, 305, 501, 503, 505, 521, 524 and one additional mathematics elective at the 500-level, chosen with departmental approval. In addition: CSC 123 and 124 (or any two of CSC 104, 105, and 113), PHYS 215 and 216, and two statistics courses, chosen with departmental approval.

Bachelor of Science in Mathematics/Physics

Required mathematics courses. The calculus sequence (MATH 121, 122, 221, 222); MATH 305, 501, 505, 506, 521; and one additional course at the 500 level.

Required physics courses. PHYS 215 (with lab 225), PHYS 216 (with lab 226), 506, 511, 512, 525, 531, 532, 535, and 536. Also PHYS 451-452 (Senior Seminar in Physics).

Required computer science courses. CSC 123 and 124.

Minor in Mathematics

The minor in mathematics is designed for those students with an interest in mathematics either for its own sake or as it relates to their major field. Certain majors have mathematics requirements which will fulfill a considerable portion of the requirements for the math minor.

The requirements are two courses in calculus (ordinarily MATH 121 and 122), MATH 305, and three other courses in mathematics (other than 108, 110, 168, 187, and 114), of which two must be at the 500-level. Other courses with sufficient mathematical content and level may be accepted. For those, the approval of the Department of Mathematics is required.

The following is a list of some disciplines and the mathematics courses (after MATH 121 and 122) relevant to them:

Major

Math Courses

Biology

531, 532

Chemistry

221, 222, 531, 532

Computer Science

501, 505, 506, 507, 515, 516, 531, 532, 537

Economics

221, 222, 501, 531, 532

Engineering

221, 222, 501, 505, 506, 507, 516, 521, 522, 524, 527, 528, 531, 532, 537, 541, 542

Physics

221, 222, 501, 505, 506, 507, 515, 516, 521, 522, 524, 527, 528, 531, 532, 537, 541, 542

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

MATH

Course Title

108

Elementary Functions

110

Finite Mathematics for Business and Economics

111, 112

Calculus for Social-Life Sciences I, II

114

Probability and Statistics

121, 122

Analytic Geometry and Calculus I, II (4,4)

168

Mathematics in Modern World

187

Introduction to Mathematical Thought

221

Analytic Geometry and Calculus III (4)

222

Calculus IV Differential Equations (4)

230

Mathematics of Politics (UH)

305

Fundamentals of Advanced Mathematics

309

Probability and Statistics for Engineers

330

Topics in Mathematical Social Sciences (UH)

501

Linear Algebra

503

Euclidean and Non-Euclidian Geometry

505, 506

Abstract Algebra I, II

507

Graph Theory

508

Elementary Number Theory

509

Algebraic Number Theory

511, 512

Mathematical Methods in Physics and Engineering

513

Rings and Modules

515

Combinatorics

516

Coding and Information Theory

520

Topology

521, 522

Introductory Analysis I, II

524

Complex Variables

527

Chaotic Dynamics

528

Fractal Geometry

531, 532

Probability and Statistics with Applications I, II

533

Stochastic Processes

537

Introduction to Fuzzy Sets and Fuzzy Logic

540

Ordinary Differential Equations

541

Introduction to Partial Differential Equations

542

Introduction to Difference Equations

550

Foundations of Mathematics

551

Introduction to Mathematical Logic

552

Formal Languages and the Theory of Computation

561, 562

Numerical Analysis I, II

584

Numerical Linear Algebra

595

Directed Reading

596

Independent Study

 

Department of Media Studies

Associate Professor

Stephen J. McKenna, Chair

Assistant Professors

Jennifer L. Fleeger; Jennifer Horne; Alex Russo

Clinical Assistant Professor

Rachael Storey

Visiting Assistant Professor Niki Akhavan

Television, cinema, newspapers and the Internet all profoundly influence our lives. The Department of Media Studies provides students with tools to analyze critically the forms and contents of mass media. An interdisciplinary field, media studies at Catholic University is rooted in traditions of rhetorical and historical criticism across the humanities.

Core courses promote understanding of film, television and related media in their varied aesthetic, social, historical, and cultural contexts. After completing the core, majors choose either the critical studies emphasis (beginning their electives with a course in cinema studies) or the production emphasis (beginning their electives with a course in video production). Students emphasizing their elective courses in either area may still take electives in both. Majors in the program also have opportunities to gain professional experience through internships. With its liberal arts commitment, the department emphasizes writing and critical thinking skills. By requiring rigorous study of the humanities while providing access to state-of-the-art digital production equipment, the program engages students as both critics and creators. Students learn how to read cultural texts critically, partly by gaining firsthand knowledge of how such texts are produced. CUA students develop a relationship to mass media that is both aware and socially responsible, one that prepares them for a wide variety of careers in fields as diverse as film and video, broadcasting, journalism, public relations, advertising, law, or teaching and scholarship in the humanities.

Majors take MDIA 201, 202, 303, 304, 401, 499, a critical studies or production elective-anchor course, and six additional courses. See the adviser for specific information. To be accepted as a major, a student must complete both MDIA 201 and 202 with a C+ average.

Suggested Sequence of Courses

Freshman

MDIA 201, 202

Sophomore

MDIA 303, 401

Junior

MDIA 304; MDIA 344 or 402; electives in critical studies or production; internship

Senior

MDIA 499; electives in critical studies or production; internship

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

MDIA

Course Title

201

Introduction to Media Studies

202

Media and History

303

Media and Rhetoric

304

Junior Seminar in Media Studies

321

Legal Issues in Communications

330

Introduction to Journalism

331

Television Reporting

333

Advanced Journalism

334

Ethics and Journalism

336

Investigative Reporting

335

Opinion and Editorial Writing

337

Media and the Underclass

344

Critical Approaches to Media

348 Moving Pictures: Screen Melodramas

352

Museum Studies

353

Television and American Culture

360

Popular Culture

377 Film and Fiction: 19th Century Adaptations

380

Video Production: The Short Subject

381

Photography in the Digital Age

384 Video Art

390

Visual Culture Studies

394

Signs and Symbols in American Life

395 Lincoln in Literature and Film

401

Media Rhetoric and Aesthetics (4)

402

Media Composition

403

Advanced Video Production

412

Special Projects in Media Production

420

Intro to Sound Production and Design

450

Film Narrative: The Coen Brothers

451

Film Narrative: Hitchcock

452

Film Narrative: Stanley Kubrick

453

American Film Comedy

455

The Crime Film and Literature

456

Science Fiction Media

457

Media Audiences: Reading and Reception

458

Religion and Media

459

The Documentary

460

Film and History

461

New American Film Directors

464 Topics in Television Studies

471

Food and Media

499

Senior Seminar: Topics in Media Studies

502

Communication Internship

519 Lincoln's Eloquence

503

Media Internship

520

American Political Rhetoric

524

The Rhetoric of Advertising

530

The Rhetoric of Propaganda

532

Visual Rhetoric

595

Independent Study

596

Independent Study in Media

 

Program in Medical Technology

Program Director: Barbara J. Howard, Biology

The university offers a four-year curriculum leading to a Bachelor of Science degree in medical technology. The curriculum for the B.S. program is as follows:

First Year. BIOL 105, 106; MATH 111, 112; CHEM 103, 104, 113, 114; ENG 101; PHIL 201, 202; one language course (intermediate level).

Second Year. BIOL 207; CHEM 203, 204, 213, 214; PHYS 205, 206, 225, 226; one 200 level TRS; one religion elective; one language course (intermediate level); two literature electives.

Third Year. BIOL 518, 549, 554, 566; two social behavioral science electives; one philosophy elective; one religion elective; one humanities elective; one computer science elective.

Fourth Year. Twelve months of clinical studies including a series of courses and supervised hospital laboratory rotations in clinical chemistry, hematology, immuno-hematology, and microbiology.

Year of Clinical Studies. The fourth year or year of clinical studies is spent at Washington Hospital Center. Because the number of positions at this affiliate is limited, the following criteria are used to evaluate admission into the fourth year: a minimum grade-point average of 2.5 overall and in the sciences, minimum TOEFL score of 500 (if applicable), three letters of recommendation and an interview. Students in the B.S. program who do not meet the minimum academic standards for admission into the clinical year but do meet those required by biology may elect to complete a baccalaureate degree in biology with some additional coursework.

The specific requirements for academic good standing in the clinical year differ from those of the university and are available from: Program Director, Room 111, McCort-Ward Biology Building, The Catholic University of America. In addition to the course requirements, students must successfully complete a comprehensive examination. Students who successfully complete the Bachelor of Science program are eligible to take any of the medical technology certifying examinations.

Students following this program fulfill the course requirements for entrance into Class A medical schools.

Program in Medieval and Byzantine Studies

Program Director: Lourdes Maria Alvarez

Center for Medieval and Byzantine Studies website and faculty listing: http://mbs.cua.edu

 

Major Program

The university's Center for Medieval and Byzantine Studies offers an interdisciplinary undergraduate major which draws upon faculty strength across the School of Philosophy, the School of Theology and Religious Studies, and numerous departments in the School of Arts and Sciences, particularly History, English, Greek and Latin, Modern Languages and Literatures, and Semitic Languages and Literatures. In addition to exploring the historical and cultural developments within the traditional boundaries of Medieval Europe from ca. A.D. 300 to 1500, students will have opportunities to study Byzantium, Islam, Judaism, and Near Eastern Christianity.

The Medieval and Byzantine Studies (MBS) major introduces students to the various fields of the discipline and their methodologies, while providing advanced training in one specific area of specialization.The major consists of the following:

  1. GATEWAY COURSE
    MDST 201, Medieval Pathways; Students in the University Honors Program may substitute HSHU 102, Charlemagne to Chaucer, with advisor approval.


  2. SPECIALIZED COURSES
    a) HISTORY AND SOCIAL STRUCTURES: two courses (6 credits) in any aspect of western or non-western
    medieval history (social, political, institutional, economic, legal, cultural, gender studies, etc.).

    b)
    THOUGHT AND WORSHIP: two courses (6 credits) in medieval religions, theology, philosophy, or liturgy (also including non-Christian traditions).

    c) CULTURAL AND ARTISTIC EXPRESSIONS: two courses (6 credits) in medieval literatures, languages, art, architecture, music, or material culture.

  3. ELECTIVES IN THE MAJOR (to complete the specialization)
    Four courses (12 credits) from the three categories of specialized courses (and a list of additional courses, including approved languages). At least two of the four courses should be in the student's area of specialization. May include relevant language courses (Latin, Greek, Arabic, Syriac, Coptic, Old English, Old Norse, and other medieval vernaculars) beyond the School's foreign language distribution requirement.

  4. SENIOR SEMINARS: MDST 451, 452

Majors should consult the advising coordinator for course selection and the sequence of courses.

Minor Program

Six courses in medieval or Byzantine studies, which must include MDST 201, Medieval Pathways. University Honors Students may substitute HSHU 102, From Charlemagne to Chaucer. Students must take at least one course in each of the areas designated above under "specialized courses." Two additional courses may be drawn from that list or from among relevant language courses (Latin, Greek, Arabic, Syriac, Coptic, Old English, Old Norse, and other medieval vernaculars) beyond the School's foreign language distibution requirement.

 


Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

MDST

Course Title

201

Medieval Pathways

451, 452 Senior Seminar

 

 

 

 

Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

Professors

Bruno M. Damiani; Joan Tasker Grimbert, Chair; Jean-Michel Heimonet

Associate Professors

Lourdes M. Alvarez; Margaret Ann Kassen; Stefania Lucamante; Hanna Marks; Peter Shoemaker; Chad C. Wright

Assistant Professors

Claudia Bornholdt; Mario Ortiz

Assistant Professor for Professional Practice

Kerstin T. Gaddy

Visiting Assistant Professor Rafaela Fiore Urízar

The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures offers Bachelor of Arts majors in the following fields: French, German, Spanish, Spanish for International Service, and a joint degree combining French, German, or Spanish with Secondary Education. In addition to the three major language specializations, the Department offers courses in Italian, which may lead to a minor in Italian Studies.

Undergraduate programs in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures stress both practical and humanistic goals. A series of graduated language courses permits acquisition of oral, aural, and written mastery of a foreign language. A comprehensive program of courses in literature and civilization, ranging from introductory surveys through period and genre offerings to seminars treating individual major authors, provides the experience of another culture and of its modes of thought and expression.

The Department provides its graduates with both specific skills and competence and a sense of the relationship between their particular discipline and other liberal arts. Majors learn to express themselves clearly and correctly through required advanced language courses (200 through 300 level). They acquire a general knowledge of the literature as a whole in survey courses and a deeper knowledge of special areas in the courses that follow, including a number of 500-level electives. The final course taken by the major, the senior seminar, provides a capstone experience that draws upon, consolidates, and furthers knowledge and skills acquired over the student's course of study.

Students may choose to develop a minor in French, German, Italian Studies, or Spanish. Consult the individual language programs below for further details.

For students not majoring in languages, distribution requirements in literature as well as in humanities, as outlined under B.A. degree requirements, may be fulfilled by a number of courses offered by the Department.

Foreign Language Requirement

The foreign language requirement for degrees in the School of Arts and Sciences may be fulfilled by satisfactorily completing the intermediate level (103-104) in French, German, Italian, or Spanish, or by completing Spanish 210-211. Spanish 113 (6 credits) is an accelerated intermediate-level equivalent to 103-104, open by departmental permission only to highly-qualified students. In addition to placement, a prerequisite for 102, 103, 113, and 104 is a minimum grade of C- in the previous course in the sequence.

Depending on placement, elementary-level language courses may be required to reach the intermediate level. Elementary language courses are numbered 101 and 102; the four-credit French or Spanish 112 is an accelerated elementary-level equivalent to 101-102, open by placement to students with some previous experience of the language. Except for certain majors in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, elementary language courses 101, 102, and 112 count as free electives only.

Placement Examination

Any entering student who wishes to take courses in a language in which he or she has completed two years or more of high school study is required to take a placement examination and will not receive any CUA credit for courses in that language without placement. The resulting placement will be valid up to one semester after the date of the examination. See the Department's website (http://modernlanguages.cua.edu) for more information.

Education Abroad Programs

The Department recommends that majors spend at least a semester in a country in which the language is spoken, in order to increase their language proficiency and to broaden their cultural horizons.

Any CUA undergraduate student may apply for our education abroad programs. Priority will be given, first, to majors in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures and, second, to minors in the Department. The education abroad semester programs are designed for second-semester sophomores and above, although the Department recommends study in the junior year. To qualify, the applicant must comply with the following two minimum requirements:

1. Have completed the 203-204 language sequence or have the equivalent language proficiency.

2. Have a current minimum GPA of 3.0 in courses taken in the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures and an overall minimum GPA of 2.8.

CUA students must have the approval of (1) the undergraduate advisor of the language program; and (2) the CUAbroad office.

 

French

Major in French

Students acquire language proficiency and are introduced to the literatures and cultures of France and the Francophone world in courses both at CUA and during study abroad in a francophone country. They follow two introductory sequences in literature and culture. They complete degree requirements with elective courses and integrate knowledge and skills in the Senior Seminar. Study of a second foreign language is strongly recommended. Area studies courses in history, politics, art, etc., may be chosen in consultation with the advisor.

Required Courses

FREN

Course Title

203

Advanced French I: Literature and Culture

204

Advanced French II: Introduction to French Cinema

300

French Civilization

301

Writing, Reading, and Talking about Literature in French

360 Translation and Stylistics

452

Senior Seminar

Electives (Choose six)

 

FREN

Course Title

200 French Conversation

306

Contemporary France

309

Business French

311 Italian and French Women Writers

315

Literature and Film

317

Versailles: The Architecture of Power

321

Survey of French Literature I: Middle Ages and 16th Century

322

Survey of French Literature II: Love, Marriage, and Family in 17th- and 18th-Century France

323

Survey of French Literature III: From Romanticism to "Nouveau Roman"

330

Practical Phonetics

341

Francophone Cultures and Literatures

Students are also required to take two other courses from the elective options list (above), in a second foreign language, or in a related discipline in consultation with the French adviser.

Ideal Sequence of Courses

Year

Fall

Spring

First

FREN 203

FREN 204

Second

FREN 200, FREN 300

FREN 301, FREN 309, FREN 330

Third

FREN 306, 309, 315, 317, 321, 322, 323, or 341

TWO from FREN 306, 309, 311, 315, 317. 321, 322, 323, or 341

Fourth

FREN 360, 452

FREN 306, 309, 315, 317, 321, 322, 323, or 341

Minor in French

FREN 203, 204 plus any combination of four courses in language, literature, and civilization from the following: 200, 300, 301, 306, 309, 311, 315, 317, 321, 322, 323, 330, or 341. Students should consult the advisor in French concerning combinations of courses that best suit their needs and interests.

Note: Native speakers of French (francophones) may not enroll in FREN 200 (French Conversation), FREN 203-204 (Advanced Grammar and Composition), 301 (Writing, Reading, and Talking about Literature in French), or 330 (Practical Phonetics). Upper-level literature courses are open to qualified native speakers with permission of the instructor.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

FREN

Course Title

101, 102

Elementary French I, II

103, 104

Intermediate French I, II

112

Review of Elementary French (4)

200 French Conversation

203

Advanced French I: Literature and Culture

204

Advanced French II: Introduction to French Cinema

300

French Civilization

301

Writing, Reading, and Talking about Literature in French

306

Contemporary France

309

Business French

315

French Literature and Film

317

Versailles: The Architecture of Power

321

Survey of French Literature I: Middle Ages and 16th Century

322

Survey of French Literature II: Love, Marriage, and Family in 17th- and 18th-Century France

323

Survey of French Literature III: From Romanticism to "Nouveau Roman"

330

Practical Phonetics

341

Francophone Cultures and Literatures

360 Translation and Stylistics

452

Senior Seminar

500

Reading for Comprehension

German

Major in German

The German major stresses both practical and humanistic goals. Language acquisition is central. The program provides the experience of another culture and of its modes of thought and expression.

German majors learn to express themselves clearly and correctly in advanced language courses beyond the intermediate level, taught at CUA or in our programs in Germany. Students are introduced to the culture and literature of German speaking countries. They deepen their knowledge of special periods, themes, and authors and sharpen their critical tools in the higher level courses that follow. These include a significant writing component. The final course taken by the major, the senior seminar, coordinates knowledge and skills acquired. Study of a second foreign language at the intermediate level is strongly recommended. Four area studies courses in history, politics, art, etc. may be substituted in consultation with the advisor.

Required courses

Two advanced language courses plus one at the 400 level, two introductory courses in culture or literature, Senior Seminar.

GER

Course Title

203

Advanced German I: German through Film

204 Advanced German II: German through Literature

301

"The Germans": Christian Culture in its European Context

302

Culture, Politics, and National Identity: From the 18th Century to the Third Reich

351

Introduction to German Literature I: From the Middle Ages to the 18th Century

352

Introduction to German Literature II: The 19th and 20th Centuries

 

401

German in Business and Politics

     
402 Translation in Theory and Practice      

452

Senior Seminar

Electives

Choose six electives. Study abroad courses may also be approved by the adviser.

GER

Course Title

   
220 Austria in Literature and the Arts

250

Berlin in Literature and Film

330 German Theater: Text and Performance
342 The Nibelungenlied: Myth and Ideology

360

After the Wall: Literature and Film in the New Germany

531

Confronting the Past: The Literary Scene after 1945

541 Modern German Drama
547 The German Novelle

551

German Poetry

Four courses in related area studies to be approved by the advisor, or a second foreign language through the intermediate level, are also part of the degree.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

GER

Course Titles

101, 102

Elementary German I, II

103, 104

Intermediate German I, II

203

Advanced German I: German Through Film

204 Advanced German II: German Through Literature
220 Austria in Literature and the Arts

250

Berlin in Literature and Film

301

"The Germans": Christian Culture in its European Context

302

Culture, Politics, and National Identity from the 18th Century to the Third Reich

330 German Theater: Text and Performance
342 The Niebelungenlied: Myth and Ideology

351

Introduction to German Literature I: From the Middle Ages to the 18th Century

352 Introduction to German Literature II: The 19th and 20th Centuries

360

After the Wall: Literature and Film in the New Germany

401

German in Business and Politics

402 Translation in Theory and Practice

452

Senior Seminar

500

Reading for Comprehension (0)

531

Confronting the Past: The Literary Scene after 1945

541

Modern German Drama

547

The German Novelle

551

German Poetry

Minor in German

GER 203, 204, plus a combination of four courses in language, literature, and civilization from the following: 220, 250, 301, 302,330, 342, 351, 352, 360, 401, 402, 531, 541, 547, 551. Students should consult the advisor in German concerning combinations of courses. Study abroad courses may also be approved by the adviser.

Italian

Minor in Italian Studies

This program is designed for students who have a strong interest in Italian culture. Courses give students a wide knowledge of Italian current literary and cultural phenomena. A course in Italian American studies is also offered to provide an ideal bridge between Italian traditional studies and more current ones.

This program ranges from introductory surveys through period and genre offerings to seminars treating individual major authors. Italian Studies minors are encouraged to take courses in areas such as fine arts, government, and history that may help prepare them for successful careers in government, law, international business, medicine, education, or the arts. Students are required to complete six courses toward the minor in Italian Studies after the completion of the 101-04 sequence.

Required

ITAL

Course Title

203

Advanced Italian I: Talking About Culture

204

Advanced Italian II: Talking About Culture

AND four or more courses in literature and culture, either taught in English or in Italian (or both if placed above the intensive basic level), from among the following:

301

Survey in Italian Culture and Literature

302

Survey in Italian Culture and Literature

306

The Italian American Experience: A Survey

310

Italian Women Writers

320

The Splendor of Rome in Film and Literature

327

The Contemporary Italian Novel

331

The New Italian Cinema

With the approval of the academic advisor of the Italian program, two courses from among the following may replace electives listed above:

ITAL

Upper-level courses (taught in either Italian or English)

HIST

222, 317

ART

212, 307, 319, 320

CLAS

318

Other courses related to the Italian studies program can be chosen with the approval of the academic adviser of the Italian program.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

ITAL

Course Title

101, 102

Elementary Italian I, II

103, 104

Intermediate Italian I, II

203, 204

Advanced Italian I, II: Talking About Culture

301, 302

Survey of Italian Literature I, II

306

The Italian American Experience: A Survey

310

Italian Women Writers

311 Italian and French Women Writers

320

Rome in Literature and Film

327

The Contemporary Italian Novel

331

New Italian Cinema: 1980-2005

494

Independent Study

500

Reading for Comprehension

Spanish

Major in Spanish Literature

This program has been designed to enable students to attain a high level of language proficiency, suitable for a variety of careers relating to the Spanish-speaking world. The major also introduces students to the literatures, literary contexts and multifaceted cultures of Spain, Latin America and Hispanic United States. Students who begin the program with an advanced level of proficiency may be allowed to substitute higher level courses with the consent of their advisor.

Required Courses

SPAN

Course Title

203, 204
or
210, 211

Advanced Conversation and Composition I, II

Spanish for Bilingual Students I, II

205
or
206

Cultural Perspectives of Spain and Latin America

Topics in Latin American Culture

300

Introduction to Literature

310

Contemporary Latin America in Dialogue with the World

320

Spanish Translation I

448

Undergraduate Seminar/Cervantes

452

Senior Seminar

   

 

Ideal Sequence of Courses

Year

Fall

Spring

First

SPAN 203 or 210

SPAN 204 or 211

Second

SPAN 205 or 206, 310

SPAN 300, elective

Third

SPAN 420

Spanish electives

Fourth

SPAN 448

SPAN 452

 

Electives

Four additional courses at the 300-level or higher, of which two must be at the 400-level or higher and taken at CUA. Electives are chosen in consultation with the major advisor.

Second Language / Area Studies

Beyond the core major requirements, students will take four courses providing additional knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world and, as an option, intermediate-level or higher competence in another foreign language. The individual course of study is taken upon consultation with and approval of the major Spanish advisor, following any of these options:

1. Four courses (12 credit hours) selected from courses that focus on the Spanish-speaking world in social and behavioral sciences, and humanities. These courses may be taken either in either English or Spanish. Students may include here up to two additional courses in Spanish language, literature or culture, or SPAN 450 (Internship).

2. Four courses in a second foreign language (ancient or modern).

3. A combination of courses in a second foreign language AND courses chosen from those focusing on the Spanish-speaking world in social and behavioral sciences, and humanities. These courses may be taken in either English or Spanish. The second language component must be completed in the same language. Students may include here up to two additional courses in Spanish language, literature or culture, or SPAN 450 (Internship).

Major in Spanish for International Service

Spanish for International Service (SIS) is a pre-professional, career-oriented program to prepare students for service in government or private agencies and business in Spanish language-related fields. SIS offers a flexible alternative to the traditional literature-oriented B.A. The Spanish component of SIS consists of 12 courses (36 semester credit hours), and has been designed to develop language proficiency and to acquaint the student with the Spanish world. Students who begin the program with an advanced level of proficiency may be allowed to substitute higher level courses with the consent of their advisor.

Required Courses

SPAN

Course Title

203, 204
or
210, 211

Advanced Conversation and Composition I, II

Spanish for Bilingual Students

205
or
206

Cultural Perspectives of Spain and Latin America

Topics in Latin American Culture

300

Introduction to Literature

310

Contemporary Latin America in Dialogue with the World

320

Translation I

450

Internship

462

Senior Seminar

 

 

 

Electives

Four additional courses (12 credit hours) at the 300-level or higher, of which at least two must be at the 400-level or higher and taken at CUA.

 

Ideal Sequence of Courses

Year

Fall

Spring

First

SPAN 203 or 210

SPAN 204 or 211

Second

SPAN 205 or 206, 310

SPAN 300, elective

Third

SPAN 320

SPAN electives

Fourth

SPAN 450, 400-elective

SPAN 462, 400-level elective

 

Second Language / Area Studies

Beyond the core major requirements, students will take six courses (18 credit hours) providing additional knowledge of the Spanish-speaking world and, as an option, intermediate-level or higher competence in another foreign language. The individual course of study is taken upon consultation with and approval of the major Spanish adviser, following any of these options:

1. Six courses (18 credit hours) selected from courses that focus on the Spanish-speaking world in social and behavioral sciences, and humanities. (These courses may be in English or Spanish.) Students may include here up to two additional courses in Spanish language, literature, or culture.

2. Two courses (6 credit hours) in a second foreign language at the intermediate level or higher, AND four courses (12 credit hours) from courses that focus on the Spanish-speaking world in social and behavioral sciences and humanities. The second language component must be completed in the same language and may include the following courses: intermediate (i.e. 103-104) or higher level in French, German, Italian, Latin or Greek; or introductory courses in critical languages (such as Arabic or Chinese).

3. A minor in Latin American and Latino Studies (LALS). See LALS advisor for minor requirements.

 

Minor in Spanish

Students planning a minor in Spanish must complete six courses at the 203 level and above, with a maximum of three courses at the 200-level. Students should consult the minor advisor in Spanish concerning the selection and combination of courses.

Modern Languages/Secondary Education Joint Program

In collaboration with the Department of Education, sudents majoring in French, German, or Spanish may follow a joint program in modern languages/secondary education to prepare themselves to teach French, German, or Spanish at the secondary school level. Students in the joint program will complete the major program in their chosen language and a program in education (seven courses, including a student-teaching internship). Courses in language, literature, conversation, civilization, linguistics, and methodology, along with the appropriate education courses, will help students acquire the skills and knowledge necessary for successful teaching. Modern languages majors who wish to avail themselves of this program should consult the undergraduate advisers in both departments as soon as possible in their undergraduate careers in order to ensure that they make room in their schedules for all the required courses in both fields. See secondary education requirements in the Department of Education section of these Announcements.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

ML

Course Title

504

Topics in Applied Linguistics

521

Principles and Practices of Second Language Teaching

531

Introduction to the Graduate Study of Literature

 

SPAN

Course Title

101, 102

Elementary Spanish I, II

103, 104

Intermediate Spanish I, II

107

Spanish for Health Services

108

Spanish for Health Services II

112

Review of Elementary Spanish (4)

113

Intensive Intermediate Spanish (6)

203, 204

Advanced Spanish Conversation and Composition I, II

205

Cultural Perspectives of Spain and Latin America

206

Topics in Latin American Culture

207, 208 Advanced Spanish for Health Services I, II

210, 211

Spanish for Bilingual Students I, II

300

Introduction to Literature

301

Spanish Phonetics

310

Contemporary Latin America in Dialogue

311

Mastering Spanish Through Theater

320, 321

Translation I, II

326 Medieval Spain at the Crossroads of Cultures

350

Medieval Spanish Literature

370

Spanish Civil War in Literature, Art, and Film

371

Spanish and Latin American Literature in English

380

Film, Culture, and History

410

Survey of Modern and Contemporary Latin American Literature

411

Survey of Latin American Literature: Colony and Independence

420

Survey of Peninsular Literature

421

Survey of Peninsular Literature: Medieval Spanish Literature to Golden Age

448

Cervantes and Spanish Golden Age

450

Internship

452

Coordinating Seminar for Literature Majors

462

Coordinating Seminar: Spanish for International Service

500

Reading for Comprehension (0)

501

Spanish Language and Culture for Health Profession

514

The Libro de Buen Amor and Medieval Discourses on Love

515

Medieval Iberian Prose

516

Medieval Iberian Lyric Poetry

517

Medieval Iberian Narrative

518

The Journey in Spanish Literature

522

Prose of the Golden Age

523

Golden Age Poetry

524

Pastoral Novel

525

Survey of Golden Age Drama

533

The Spanish Picaresque Novel

534

Prose of the Spanish Mystics

541

18th Century and Romanticism in Spain

542

Realism in Spain

543

Generation of 1898 and Modernism

544

Generation of 1927-Vanguardism

545

Modern Spanish Short Story and Novella

546

Spanish Literature of the Turn of the Century 1880-1920

551

Latin American Essay

553

Latin American Short Story

554

Spanish American Poetry

556

Latin American Popular Song: Socio-Political Movements

558

Indigenismo

595

Independent Study

596

Independent Study

 

 

 

Program in Music

Program Coordinator: Amy Antonelli, Assistant Dean, Benjamin T. Rome School of Music

Major Program

In cooperation with the faculty of the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music, the School of Arts and Sciences offers the B.A. degree with a major in music.

Prerequisities. MUS 121, 122, 123, 124, 221, 222, 223, 224; four semesters of private instruction (MUPI 169, 169, 169, 169; 3 semester hours each).

Required. MUS 321, 322, 325, 326, 327[5]; four additional semesters of private instruction (MUPI 169, 169, 169, 169; 3 semester hours each); instrumental ensembles, chorus or orchestra each semester; one-hour senior recital. Upon successful completion of a proficiency audition, an undergraduate student may be admitted provisionally as a music concentrator. At the completion of the student's fourth semester of study, the faculty adviser in music will evaluate the student's records and recommend whether the student should or should not be accepted formally as a music concentrator. In questionable cases, the adviser is permitted to recommend that the decision be delayed for a maximum of one additional semester, in order to evaluate further the student's progress. This recommendation is subject to the approval of the dean of the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music and the dean of the School of Arts and Sciences.

Specific requirements for acceptance as a music concentrator include (1) successful completion of prerequisite courses in music as listed above; (2) an average of at least 3.0 in Major Private Instruction (169, 169, 169, 169) and appropriate performing level where applicable, and (3) an average rating of at least 85 in the applied jury at the end of the sophomore level.

In order to graduate, piano majors must complete Level IX. Requirements for each level appear in the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music section of these Announcements.

Note: Courses for non-majors are offered on a rotational basis each semester. Consult the current class schedule. Qualified students, however, may choose courses in music theory or applied music to fulfill the humanities requirement or as electives; permission of the dean of the music school is required. Performing organizations (see below) are open to qualified non-majors for credit.

Transfer students must successfully complete a minimum of eight semester credits in music (two semesters of private instruction and two semesters of performing organizations) in addition to the graduation recital.

For course listings or for information concerning the Bachelor of Music degree, see the Benjamin T. Rome School of Music section in these Announcements.

Peace and Justice Studies Program

Program Director: William Barbieri, Theology and Religious Studies

Program website:
pjsp.cua.edu

The School of Arts and Sciences offers an interdisciplinary undergraduate minor in peace and justice studies. The purposes of the program are to enable students to explore the complex set of issues surrounding violent and nonviolent approaches to resolving conflicts and to promote an interdisciplinary approach to the study of peace, justice, and world order.

Six courses (18 credit hours) are required to complete the minor. Three of these are core courses in, respectively, politics, sociology, and theology and religious studies. Students further choose three electives from one of three thematically defined tracks: Peacemaking in Theory and Practice, Intergroup Conflict and Cooperation, and World Conflict and Cooperation. In addition, students are expected to complete a senior thesis in consultation with the director.

Core Courses

POL 226

Introduction to Peace and Conflict Studies

SOC 102

Global Social Problems and Social Justice; or

SOC 226

Peace Studies and Conflict Resolution

TRS 334

War, Peace, and Revolution; or

TRS 381

Ways of Peace in World Religions

Sample Elective Courses:

Track I

Peacemaking in Theory and Practice

TRS 370

Theologies of Liberation

ECON 501

Ethics in Economics and Social Responsibility

EDUC 503

Human Relations and Interpersonal Communications

POL 425

Just War: Morality and International Conflict

SSS 225

Human Behavior and the Social Environment

Track II

Intergroup Conflict and Cooperation

ANTH 366

Identity and Community in America

EDUC 522

Race, Class, Gender, and Disability in Education

POL 312

The Civil Rights Movement

PSY 225

Psychology of Aggression and Violence

SSS 326

Diversity in a Multicultural Society

Track III

World Conflict and Cooperation

ANTH 217

Migrants, Refugees, and the Homeless

ENG/MDIA 452

Film Narrative: Stanley Kubrick

HIST 361

War and Society in the Middle Ages

IRST 599

Northern Ireland: Conflict and Culture

POL 406

Environment and Development

Courses taken in accredited study abroad programs may be accepted through application. The list of eligible courses is updated periodically. In putting together a course program, students should consult with the director.

Students electing to take the minor must fill out the Application for Minor form, available in the Undergraduate Office of the School of Arts & Sciences. The director may be contacted at: barbieri@cua.edu.

Program in Philosophy

Program Coordinator: John McCarthy, Associate Dean, School of Philosophy

Distribution Requirements

In cooperation with the faculty of the School of Philosophy, the School of Arts and Sciences offers the B.A. degree with a major in philosophy. The Philosophy faculty also provides courses to fulfill the distribution requirement in philosophy.

Students in the School of Arts and Sciences taking courses in philosophy must observe the following:

  1. PHIL 201 and 202 are prerequisites for all philosophy courses in the areas listed below and are required of all undergraduates enrolled in the School of Arts and Sciences, except for participants in the University Honors Program philosophy sequence.
  2. In addition to 201 and 202, students in the School of Arts and Sciences, who are pursuing a B.A. degree, must elect two additional courses in order to fulfill the four-course philosophy requirement: one from the area Logic, Morality, and Action and one from the area Nature, Knowledge, and God.
  3. Students are free to elect additional courses from the two areas and any 500-level course, except 557 and 558.

Required

PHIL

Course Title

201

The Classical Mind: The Origin and Growth of Western Philosophy

202

The Modern Mind: Philosophy from Descartes to the Present

Area I. Logic, Morality, and Action

PHIL

Course Title

301

Reasoning and Argumentation

303

Biomedical Ethics

309

Ethics

310

Philosophy of Art

311

Contemporary Moral Issues

332

Political Philosophy

333

Philosophy of Natural Right and Natural Law

351

Introduction to Symbolic Logic

403

Morality and Law

Area II. Nature, Knowledge, and God

PHIL

Course Title

305

Metaphysics

308

Philosophy of God

313

Philosophy of Human Nature

315

Philosophy of Language

317

Philosophy of Religion

328

Philosophy of the Social Sciences

329

Philosophy of Science

331

Philosophy of Knowledge

Major Programs

Students who wish to enter a major program in philosophy must have a 3.0 overall grade point average.

Concentration Program

This program is designed to provide students with a broad philosophical background and the opportunity to do upper-division work in related disciplines. It is appropriate for those students who wish to use philosophy as a preparation for careers in business, industry, government, etc. It can also be used as a preparation for work in theology.

Requirements for students enrolled in the philosophy concentration major program are:

1. 309 Theories of Ethics
331 Philosophy of Knowledge
351 Introduction to Symbolic Logic
353 History of Ancient Philosophy
354 History of Medieval Philosophy
355 Metaphysics I
356 Metaphysics II
453 History of Modern Philosophy
454 Contemporary Philosophy
557 Senior Seminar I
558 Senior Seminar II

2. One other course in philosophy, to be selected from:
310 Philosophy of Art
311 Contemporary Moral Issues
313 Philosophy of Human Nature
315 Philosophy of Language
317 Philosophy of Religion
329 Philosophy of Science
332 Political Philosophy
or a 500-level course
 
3. Other courses to fulfill distribution requirements.
4. Comprehensive examination.

Pre-Law Program

This program is designed for students who wish to prepare for a career in law or related fields. The curriculum emphasizes those philosophical topics and skills pertinent to the study of law.

Requirements for students enrolled in the philosophy pre-law major program are:

1. 301 Reasoning and Argumentation
353 History of Ancient Philosophy
354 History of Medieval Philosophy
355 Metaphysics I
356 Metaphysics II
453 History of Modern Philosophy
454 Contemporary Philosophy
557 Senior Seminar I
558 Senior Seminar II

2. Two of the following:
332 Political Philosophy
3
33 Philosophy of Natural Right and Natural Law
403 Morality and Law
 
3. One elective from the following:
309 Theories of Ethics
310 Philosophy of Art
311 Contemporary Moral Issues
313 Philosophy of Human Nature
315 Philosophy of Language
317 Philosophy of Religion
329 Philosophy of Science
331 Philosophy of Knowledge
or a 500-level course

4. Comprehensive examination.

For course descriptions and for information concerning the Bachelor of Philosophy and the Bachelor of Arts program in the School of Philosophy, see the School of Philosophy listings in these Announcements.

Minor Program

The minor in philosophy consists of two courses in addition to the four-course distribution requirement. One of the additional courses must be from Area I and the other from Area II.

Department of Physics

Professors

Frederick C. Bruhweiler; Pedro B. Macedo; Ian Pegg; Lorenzo Resca; Daniel I. Sober, Chair

Professors Emeriti

Hall L. Crannell; Jack R. Leibowitz; Paul H. E. Meijer; Herbert M. Ã?berall; Carl W. Werntz

Adjunct Professors

Natchimuthukonar Gopalswamy; Theodore Gull; Stuart Jordan; Yoji Kondo; Raffaele Resta

Research Professors

Vladimir Krasnopolsky; Walter Madigosky; Donald J. Michels

Associate Professors

Duilia F. DeMello; Biprodas Dutta; Franz J. Klein; Steven B. Kraemer

Adjunct Associate Professors

Edward Colbert; Patrick Mehl; Orville Chris St. Cyr; Robin Selinger

Research Associate Professors

Pamela Clark; Ralph B. Fiorito; Michael Goodman; Shrikanth Kanekal; Robert Mohr; Leon Ofman; Charles R. Proffitt; Myron A. Smith; Richard Starr; Glenn M. Wahlgren

Assistant Professors

Tanja Horn; John Philip; Abhijit Sarkar

Adjunct Assistant Professor

Isabelle Müller

Research Assistant Professors

Peter C. Chen; Daniel Michael Crenshaw; Dana Hurley Crider; Thomas Moran

Research Associates

Arthur Aikin; Boncho Bonev; Jeffrey Brosius; Ronald Carlson; Jeffrey Hayes; Sergio Ipatov; Rosina Iping; Gunther Kletetschka; Gladys Vieira Kober; Maxim Kramar; Alexander Kutepov; Alejandro Lara-Sanchez; Allen Lunsford; Norman F. Ness; Krister Nielsen; Sten Odenwald; Vladimir Osherovich; Lutz Rastaetter; Nelson Reginald; Michael Reiner; Richard Schwartz;
Malgorzata Selwa; Guillermo Stenborg; David Steyert; Ekaterina Verner; Geronimo Villanueva; Gerald Williger; Hong Xie; Seiji Yashiro

The study of physics is an attempt to understand the physical universe in as fundamental a way as possible. It examines the mathematical relationships that exist among the physical entities of the world and, in particular, tries to discover the general principles that govern the behavior of the microscopic and macroscopic universe. Majors are prepared to enter graduate work with a firm grasp of the fundamentals. Introductory and special purpose courses are provided for students specializing in a wide variety of disciplines.

Major Program

Prerequisities. PHYS 215, 216, 225, 226, 506; MATH 121, 122, 221, 222.

Required. PHYS 451, 452, 511, 512, 525, 531, 532, 535, 536. Additional courses in mathematics, physics, and allied fields are selected with approval of the student's adviser. The exact number of such courses depends upon whether the student is pursuing a B.A. or a B.S. curriculum.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

PHYS

Course Title

101

20th Century Physics I

103

Astronomy

104

Search for Extraterrestrial Life

122

Sound and Light in Nature and Arts

177

Freshman Seminar: The Atomic Age

191

The Newtonian Revolution

192

The Einstein, Bohr Revolution

194

Space, Time, and Einstein's Theory of Relativity (UH)

197

The Universe: The First 15 Billion Years (UH)

199

Newton to Einstein and Beyond (UH)

205, 206

College Physics I, II (4,4)

215, 216

University Physics I, II (4,4)

225

Introductory Mechanics Laboratory (1)

226

Introductory Electricity Laboratory (1)

240

Sun and Earth: Concepts and Connections

451

Senior Seminar (0)

452

Senior Seminar II (0)

506

Introduction to Modern Physics

511, 512

Mathematical Physics I, II

521

Advanced Research Practice

522

Advanced Research Practice II

523

Readings in Physics

524

Readings in Physics II

525

Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics

528

Optics

531, 532

Quantum Theory I. II

534

Advanced Physical Laboratory

535

Analytical Mechanics

536

Electricity and Magnetism

537

Nuclear Physics

540

Materials Science: Solids

541 Nanotechnology

543

Introduction to Astrophysics

562

Space Weather I: Solar Physics

563

Space Weather II: Earth/Sun Interactions

564

Space Weather III: Magnetospheric Physics

565

Intermediate Solid State Physics

591

Solar Data Analysis (1)

 

Department of Politics

Professors

Claes G. Ryn; Wallace Thies; David Walsh; John Kenneth White

Professors Emeriti

Charles R. Dechert; John K.C. Oh; Joan B. Urban

Associate Professors

Phillip Henderson, Chair; Dennis Coyle; Maryann Cusimano Love; John A. Kromkowski; James P. O'Leary; Stephen Schneck

Assistant Professors

Matthew Green; Andrew Yeo; Christopher Darnton

Lecturers

John Hurley; Lee Edwards; William Heaton, Brendan Geary, Gregory Baldi

The Catholic University of America's Department of Politics offers a B.A. degree in politics. The faculty share a strong commitment to theoretical, historical, institutional, and constitutional approaches to the study of government and politics. In political theory, the department has special strengths in the history of Western political thought, American political thought, Christian political thought, culture and politics, constitutionalism, and contemporary political thought. In American government and politics, the department offers in-depth perspectives on the American presidency, Congress, the Supreme Court, constitutional law, U.S. political leadership, American political development, the values divide in American politics, and political parties and elections. In the field of world politics, the department offers broad expertise in such areas as American foreign policy; international relations; comparative government and politics; international political economy; European security; national security policy; modern Russia; Russian foreign policy; East Asian security; U.S. relations with China, Japan, and Korea; Latin American Politics; and U.S. Foreign Policy toward Latin America.

Major Program

Politics majors must successfully complete three introductory courses: Politics 111, Introduction to American Politics; Politics 112, Introduction to Comparative Politics; and Politics 211, Introduction to Political Theory. In addition, Politics 212, Introduction to International Relations, is required for all students specializing in world politics.

Each major takes at least 12 but not more than 14 courses in politics. Students are encouraged to take a broad range of courses and must pass a senior comprehensive examination covering all three of the subfields of politics. In addition, each major will select an area of specialization within the department in either American Government, Political Theory, or World Politics (which includes International Relations and Comparative Politics) from which the second part of the senior comprehensive examination will be drawn. The department also offers special programs, including the programs in pre-law and political economy.

In the junior year or first semester of the senior year, a politics major must demonstrate a capacity for systematic writing and thinking in a substantial research paper, normally completed within an advanced course in the student's specialization. Each politics major works closely with a member of the faculty to develop, revise, and refine the senior research paper. Qualified students may satisfy this requirement by writing a senior honors thesis. A student who is interested in the thesis option should, after consultation with a prospective director, submit a proposal to the department in September of the senior year.

Parliamentary Internships and International Studies

The department offers a variety of opportunities for internships and study abroad. These include programs in British politics in London, Irish society and politics in Dublin, and European studies in Leuven, Belgium. The British and Irish programs include internships within the respective parliaments, together with regular coursework in politics and other subjects. The European Studies Program focuses on European political and economic integration, comparative government, the institutions of the European community, and European culture.

Washington Area Internships

Students who wish to undertake academically supervised field work in Congress, one of the executive agencies, a political party or an association having an impact on public life may register for an internship course (Politics 593 or 594). An undergraduate student may take two internships for credit, which may be applied to the 12-course concentration in politics.

Pre-Law Concentration

Students planning a career in law may wish to complete the department's pre-law sequence. In addition to the regular specialization requirements in American government, world politics or political theory, students complete a four-course sequence in public law. Each course in this sequence also counts for one of the other specializations.

In addition to the department's three introductory courses (see above), pre-law students are required to take POL 220, Introduction to Law and Politics. POL 220 should be taken first, but may be taken concurrently with another public law course.

Pre-law students must also take two public law courses at the 300 or 400 level, including at least one semester of Constitutional Law (POL 323 or 324). Pre-law students also must take an approved 500-level seminar course, typically during the senior year. Courses may include POL 507, The Supreme Court; POL 553, Constitutional Theory and Interpretation; POL 578, Advanced Topics in Public Law; or other courses designated at the time of registration. This course may be used to fulfill the departmental seminar-paper requirement.

For further information, or for advice on preparing and applying for law school, contact the department's pre-law sequence adviser, Professor Dennis Coyle (Coyle@cua.edu).

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester. The courses below are designated as belonging to one of the three fields of specialization offered by the department. However, many of the courses cut across the boundaries within the discipline of politics and can be applied toward more than one field. Students should consult their adviser as to how particular courses may satisfy requirements in their program.

POL

Course Title

111

Introduction to American Government

112

Introduction to Comparative Politics

211

Introduction to Political Theory

212

Introduction to International Relations

220

Introduction to Law and Politics

226

Introduction to Peace Studies

 

 

300

Introduction to Asian Politics

302

Contemporary Issues of U.S. Policy

305

Person and Polity

307

Global Issues

310

The U.S. Presidency

311

Changing Western Europe

312

The Civil Rights Movement

313

Urban Government and Politics

314

American Ethnic Politics

315

Modern China and the World

316

The Congress

317

American Public Opinion

 

 

320

Comparative World Media

321

Legal Issues in Communications

323, 324

Constitutional Law I, II

331

Globalization and Social Movement

359

Ancient and Medieval Political Thought

360

Modern Political Thought

362

Christian Political Thought

363

Politics of the 60's

364

Cold War Politics

370

Russian Politics: Gorbachev, Yeltsin, Putin

371

Politics of New East Europe

400

American Political Parties

401

Media and American Politics

402

The Values Divide: American Politics and Culture in Transition

403

Poverty, Social Welfare and Public Policy

404

Law and Morality

405

National Elections

406

Environment and Development

407

U.S. Political Leadership to 1912

408

The Separation of Powers

410, 411

American Political Thought I, II

412

National Policy-Making Processes

413

Power, Morality, and Culture

414

Reading Marx

415

International Organizations

416

Comparative Political Development

 

 

418

Ecology and Political Theory

419

Interest Groups and American Politics

420

Contemporary Issues in Congress

422

Religion and Public Policy

423

Politics and Military Strategy

424

Contemporary Issues in State and Local Government

425

Just War: Morality and International Conflict

427

U.S. Leadership Since 1912

428

Conservatism and American Politics

431A

East Asian Security

433

Politics of Food

435

Constitutional Politics Europe

445

U.S. Foreign Policy

446

European Integration

447

War and Peace in Nuclear Age

448

Varieties of Capitalism

452

The American Federal System

455

Intro into American Political Development

462

Principles of American Founding

464

Topics in Congressional Politics

465

American Political Culture

 

 

478

Environmental Politics

 

 

489

Comparative Politics: Non-Western Politics and Culture

490

Politics of Reconstruction and Reparation

498, 499

Senior Honors Thesis

501

Globalization

502

Democracy and Its Critics

505

Comparative Politics (Leuven)

506

Politics and the Imagination

507

The Supreme Court

508

The United States Presidency

509

Contemporary Issues in Urban and Ethnic Politics

510

Property Rights and Environmental Policy

511

Irish Society and Politics (Dublin)

513

Bureaucratic Politics and Administration

514

The New Political Anthropology

516

Irish Parliament Internship (Dublin)

518

American Political Parties and the Political Process

519

Science Policy Issues: Environment

520

U.S. Political Leadership

521

The Presidency and the Congress

523

Voting and Elections

524

The War on Terrorism

527

Parliamentary Studies (London)

528

Congressional Internship

529

Liberalism and Its Critics

530

Classics of Political Economy

531

Introduction to the Institutions and Policies of the European Community (Leuven)

533

Elements of Political Analysis: The Policy Approach

534

Security after the Cold War

535

U.S Foreign Policy

536

Comparative Politics (Leuven)

537

International Political Economy

538

Topics in International Political Economy

540

New Issues in Old Europe

541

British Parliamentary Studies (London)

542

British Politics

545

Contemporary Issues in the U.K.

548

Contemporary Political Theory

549, 550

European Parliamentary Internship

553

Constitutional Theory and Interpretation

554

Constitutional Political Economy

555

Conservatism

556

The Moral Problem of Politics

557

Contemporary Military Strategy

558

Just Peace

559

The Media and Foreign Policy

560

Issues in U.S. Foreign Policy

561

War Crimes

562

Seminar: American Political Development

563

Politics of Post-Soviet Russia

570

Contemporary Irish Society

572

Political and Military Problems of Developing Nations

573

United States-Latin American Relations

575

International Politics: Atlantic Alliances

576

Ethics and Public Policy

577

Political Theory of the American Framing

578

Advanced Topics in Public Law

579

Capitalism

580

Grassroots Politics in Latin America

583

Comparative Political Development

584

Jurisprudence

585

Constitutionalism in Comparative Perspective

590

Contending Civilizations

591 A

State-Minority Relations in Asia

593, 594

Washington Internship

595, 596

Independent Study

599

Northern Ireland: Conflict and Culture

Department of Psychology

 

Professors

Diane B. Arnkoff; James F. Brennan, Provost; Carol R. Glass; James H. Howard Jr.; David A. Jobes; Martin A. Safer; Marc M. Sebrechts, Chair; Barry M. Wagner

Professors Emeriti

James P. O'Connor; Bruce M. Ross; Antanas Suziedelis

Associate Professor

Deborah M. Clawson

Research Associate Professor

Cheryl Y. Trepagnier

Assistant Professors

Sandra Barrueco; Rebecca L.M. Fuller; Marcie Goeke-Morey; Brendan Rich

Senior Lecturer Paul Fedio

Lecturers

Anita Boss; Rolando Díaz; Keith Kaufman; C. David Missar; John Parkhurst; Jonathan Segal

The Department of Psychology, one of the first established in the United States, was founded in 1891 by Edward Pace upon his return from study with Wilhelm Wundt in Leipzig. From early in its history, the department has combined education in both theoretical and applied aspects of psychology.

The B.A. program in psychology is designed to give students a thorough background in psychological theory and methodology and to acquaint them with a variety of content areas such as developmental, social, personality, clinical, perception, cognition, and neuroscience. This program gives the major an excellent preparation for graduate training in psychology. It also provides preparation for graduate work in other social science domains such as education, sociology, and political science, as well as for professional training in medicine, physical therapy, business, social work, and law. There are many areas of employment for psychology majors with a B.A. degree, including advertising, management, mental health, child development, forensics, communications, education, marketing, personnel, human resources, and government.

Psychology majors are required to take a total of 12 courses in psychology, including General Psychology (201), Introductory Statistics (322, includes lab), General Research Methods in Psychology (350, includes lab), and Senior Seminar (451). Out of the eight remaining electives in psychology, one course must be selected from each of four content areas: experimental, clinical, developmental, and social/personality psychology. In addition, one of these eight electives must be a 370-level course together with its corresponding 470-level laboratory section, to be taken after completing PSY 322 and 350.

Students have the opportunity to earn course credit for hands-on research experience (Research Apprenticeship, Independent Study) and for Psychology Internships at numerous sites in the Washington, DC area. Juniors with at least a 3.7 GPA who are involved in ongoing research with a department faculty member may apply to do a Senior Thesis (with Department consent).

Students must maintain a 2.0 overall grade point average, and earn grades of C- or better in all psychology courses. Undergraduate psychology requirements and information on the department and on careers in psychology are given in the Psychology Undergraduate Handbook, available from the Department of Psychology and on the departmental Web site: http://psychology.cua.edu. Courses are numbered as most appropriate for, but not limited to, the following students: 200 level, all students, no prerequisites; 300 level, all students, sometimes with PSY 201 as prerequisite; 400 level, juniors and seniors with PSY 201 as prerequisite; 500 level, juniors and seniors (and also masters-level students) with PSY 201 as prerequisite; 600 level, most appropriate for masters-level students but open to juniors and seniors by permission of instructor.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

PSY

Course Title

201

General Psychology

220

Psychology of Visual Art

221 Memory at the Movies

222

Psychology and Technology

223

Death and Dying

224

Psychology of Women and Men

225

Psychology of Aggression and Violence

226

Close Interpersonal Relationships

228

Modern Look at Freudian Psychology

232

Psychology of Stress and Coping

240

The Aging Mind

243

Sport Psychology

302

Forensic Psychology

303 Industrial/Organizational Psychology

304

Brain and Behavior

305

Social Psychology

306

Psychology of Group Behavior

307

Child Development

308

Social Development

309

Psychology of Adolescence

322

Introductory Statistics (4)

341

Psychology of Memory

345 Clinical Neuroscience

350

General Research Methods in Psychology (4)

371

Sensation and Perception

373

Cognitive and Behavior Therapy

374

Personality Psychology

376

Cognitive Psychology

379

Life Span Development

380

Abnormal Psychology

381

Clinical Psychology

382

Abnormal Child Psychology

383

Health Psychology

384

Community and Cultural Psychology

385

Psychology of Brain Injury

421

Positive Psychology

451

Senior Seminar

471

Laboratory in Sensation and Perception (1)

473

Laboratory in Cognitive and Behavior Therapy (1)

474

Laboratory in Personality (1)

476

Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology (1)

479

Laboratory in Life Span Development (1)

495-498

Research Apprenticeship for Undergraduates (1)

500,500A Senior Thesis I & II

536

Human-Computer Interaction

570

Visualization and Virtual Reality

590, 591, 592

Readings in Psychology

593, 594

Psychology Internship

595, 596

Independent Study

 

Department of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures

Professor

Rev. Sidney H. Griffith, S.T., Chair

Associate Professor

Edward M. Cook

Assistant Professor

Andrew D. Gross

Adjunct Associate Professor Janet A. Timbie

Lecturer

Shawqi Talia

Lecturer

Monica J. Blanchard

The Department of Semitic and Egyptian Languages and Literatures is basically a graduate department. Introductory language courses, however, are open to interested undergraduates. In particular, the two courses entitled "Introduction to Arabic" (241, 242) are designed to accommodate undergraduate students; 6 credits each, these two courses are equivalent to four semesters of the usual introductory and intermediate language instruction. SEM 242 fulfills the school's distribution requirement in foreign language; see the next paragraph below. 500-level courses are also open to qualified undergraduates. Undergraduate students who have completed the introductory language courses may take the more advanced courses that follow in sequence, for which they should consult the Graduate Studies Announcements.

Foreign Language Requirement

The foreign language requirement for degrees in the School of Arts and Sciences may be fulfilled by satisfactorily completing SEM 242, Introduction to Arabic (6 credits). The prerequisite for SEM 242 is SEM 241 (6 credits), with a grade of at least C-, or departmental placement. SEM 241 does not fulfill the foreign language requirement but counts as a free elective.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

SEM

Course Title

241

Introduction to Arabic (6)

242 Introduction to Arabic (6)

247

Arabic Literature in Translation

502

History of the Ancient Near East from Abraham to New Testament Times

503

History of the Christian Near East

505

History of Christians in the Islamic Near East

511 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew

512

Introduction to Biblical Hebrew

517

Readings in Biblical Hebrew

521

Introduction to Aramaic

522 Introduction to Aramaic

531

Introduction to Syriac I

532 Introduction to Syriac II

533

Basic Syriac

541

Introduction to Arabic (6)

542 Introduction to Arabic (6)
543 Basic Arabic

545

Arabic Literature I

546 Arabic Literature II

547

Arabic Literature in Translation

551

Introduction to Classical Ethiopic

552 Introduction to Classical Ethiopic

661

Introduction to Akkadian

662 Introduction to Akkadian

681

Introduction to Coptic Studies

682 Introduction to Coptic Studies

683

Basic Coptic

 

 

Program in Social Work

Program Chair: Lynn Milgram Mayer, Assistant Professor, National Catholic School of Social Service

The undergraduate program in social work prepares students for beginning professional practice in the field of social work and prepares them for graduate school. The undergraduate program is offered as a major in the School of Arts and Sciences for students currently pursuing a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degree. In 2010, the National Catholic School of Social Service will begin to offer the Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.) degree. Beginning in the 2010-2011 academic year, all undergraduate social work majors will matriculate into NCSSS for the Bachelor of Social Work degree, and the B.A. in Social Work through Arts & Sciences will be phased out. The required social work courses are taught by faculty of the NCSSS. The baccalaureate program is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Mission

Derived from the mission of The Catholic University of America, the needs of people, and the goals and values of the social work profession, the mission of the National Catholic School of Social Service is to prepare generalist and advanced practitioners, scholars and educators whose work is grounded in the social justice and charity foundation of Catholic intellectual tradition and Judeo-Christian values as well as in the tradition of a modern university, which welcomes all forms of human inquiry and values. In keeping with the teachings and values of the Roman Catholic Church, NCSSS embraces as its special responsibility the education of social workers who promote the dignity of all people as bio-psycho-social-spiritual beings, and who serve the Catholic community, the neighboring community, and beyond. Its goals are:

  1. To advance professional social work knowledge, values, and skills through the development and dissemination of social work research and theory, multidisciplinary collaboration, and other scholarly activities relevant to the times.
  2. To educate students to become ethical social work practitioners and leaders imbued with an understanding of cultural diversity and the intellectual and professional competencies capable of promoting both individual and social change.
  3. To educate students to address the basic needs of all people with particular attention to the needs and empowerment of vulnerable, oppressed, and impoverished people and communities.
  4. To contribute responsibly to social justice and to promote individual and societal well-being in the context of the Catholic and general communities on the local, national, and global levels.

Goals

Derived from both the mission of NCSSS and the university, the baccalaureate program has established eight goals:

  1. Integrate a broad liberal arts perspective with social work education and field education.
  2. Prepare beginning level social workers for generalist social work practice in a variety of settings and with diverse client populations.
  3. Develop competent social work practitioners who are steeped in respect for human diversity and in the values and ethics of the social work profession.
  4. Provide content that prepares students to become critical consumers of social work research and active participants in research efforts applicable to generalist social work practice.
  5. Provide content that enables students to recognize the dynamics of oppression and discrimination on all populations, with a special emphasis on populations-at-risk.
  6. Prepare generalist practitioners to use theories of human behavior and theories of human growth and development in order to enhance the well-being of individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.
  7. Challenge students to develop a deep commitment to the promotion of social and economic justice: the elimination of poverty, discrimination, and oppression in the context of the tradition of Catholic social teachings and the mission of The Catholic University of America.
  8. Prepare social work practitioners to analyze current social policy, critique federal, state, and local agency social programs; and examine them in the context of American social welfare history and contemporary society.

Admission

Admission to the School of Arts and Sciences is necessary to enter the undergraduate program in social work. Students are encouraged to seek advisement from the program chair as soon as they have identified an interest in social work. Students may enter the undergraduate social work program during freshman and sophomore years. To be accepted as a social work major, students must:

  1. Have at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average (after admission into the social work program, students are required to maintain a 2.7 average in the major).
  2. Have earned at least a C grade in each social work course previously taken.
  3. Have taken the following required courses: (a) a course in public speaking (DR 102, 403 or 205), (b) an introductory level course in biology (BIOL 103), and (c) a statistics course.

Student Transfer Policy

All students transferring from other accredited social work programs must meet the distribution requirements as designated by the undergraduate curriculum of the School of Arts & Sciences. After acceptance into the university and careful assessment by NCSSS, students majoring in social work may transfer up to 21 social work credits from a CSWE-accredited undergraduate social work program. These credits may include content from Introductory Social Work, Human Behavior, Social Work Policy, Research Methods, and one three-credit elective. All course syllabi submitted for transfer consideration will be reviewed before a final decision is made by the B.A. program chair. All theory and practice coursework, field practicum/internships and comprehensive seminar coursework must be completed at the National Catholic School of Social Service. Courses to be transferred into CUA toward the social work major must have been completed within the past seven years.

Advanced Standing

Graduates of social work baccalaureate programs accredited by CSWE may apply for consideration for "advanced standing" status. Individualized education contracts are developed with the applicant, indicating the number of semester hours to be waived (not to exceed thirty semester hours). Additional courses beyond thirty semester hours may be required.

Qualified social work majors may apply for advanced standing within NCSSS and should consult with the Director of Admissions on admission policy during their senior year.

The criteria for advanced standing status at NCSSS include:

  1. A bachelor's degree in social work from a CSWE accredited program (received within five years of enrollment in the M.S.W. Program); course descriptions submitted as part of the admissions packet;
  2. A cumulative average of at least 3.2 in the social work courses of the undergraduate program;
  3. A cumulative average of at least 3.0 in all courses applied toward the bachelor's degree;
  4. A minimum of B minus (B-) in each social work course to be considered for waiving of credit (approved by NCSSS faculty February 1999);
  5. A recommendation from the chair of the undergraduate program, explicitly supporting admission directly to the advanced year of the M.S.W. program, as one of the three reference letters;
  6. An undergraduate practicum experience that is comparable to that expected in NCSSS foundation practicum, as evidenced in the final field evaluation. Applicants are invited to submit their first semester field evaluation with their application prior to receipt of their final field evaluation.

Academic Requirements

The National Catholic School of Social Service affirms its right to require its students to meet accepted academic requirements that consist of scholastic and behavioral components. Consistent with Catholic social teaching and social work values, NCSSS respects the worth and value of all persons regardless of age, race, religion, gender, sexual orientation, ethnic or national origin, handicapping conditions, or diversity of opinion. Students' behavior should reflect the core values of the social work profession: service, social justice, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence. Standards for professional performance require that students adhere to ethical standards as outlined in the National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics. Please refer to NCSSS Bachelor of Arts in Social Work Student Handbook for specific scholastic and behavioral requirements and for information on review committees.

Curriculum

The curriculum is designed to prepare students for (1) direct entry into social work practice, under supervision, in public welfare agencies, general and mental health hospitals, courts and probation departments, family and children's services agencies, neighborhood and community agencies, and other settings; (2) graduate social work education; and (3) participation and leadership in the community to benefit the most disadvantaged.

Students begin learning about social welfare and social work in the introductory courses through reading, research projects, and field observation. They are encouraged to seek opportunities in the community to explore their interests in social work through volunteer and service learning opportunities. During the second semester of the junior year, students spend four hours each week observing in community social welfare agencies in a supervised field education practicum. During the senior year, all students spend two days each week in community social welfare agencies in a supervised field education practicum. This practicum enables students to test theories and develop beginning skills in the practice of social work.

Distribution requirements of the School of Arts and Sciences for the baccalaureate degree must be fulfilled. Students should consult their adviser for specific courses that are recommended within the distribution requirements.

Students majoring in social work are required to take the major and support courses diagrammed in the NCSSS Baccalaureate Student Handbook. Some courses may be substituted or added with the permission of the program chair. However, no credit is given for life or previous work experience, in whole or part, in lieu of the field practicum or of the courses in the professional foundation specified by the Curriculum Policy Statement of the Council on Social Work Education.

Distribution electives are to be taken during the freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior years. These electives should be chosen from the areas of sociology, psychology, anthropology, history, politics, and economics. The student and adviser may determine other electives that are appropriate.

Students should choose a social work elective and distribution electives that complement their area of interest, because social workers holding the baccalaureate degree have a variety of employment opportunities open to them. They work with children in foster and adoptive homes and shelters and day care centers; with teenagers and young adults wherever the young need help (for example, in community centers and clubs, on the streets and in other informal settings, in juvenile courts, youth councils, detention homes, treatment centers, reformatories, and parole departments); with community leaders, groups, and self-help organizations; with the physically disabled as part of the health and rehabilitation team in hospitals, centers, workshops, and homes; with families troubled by faltering personal relationships and such problems as alcoholism, drug addiction, mental illness, and imprisonment; and with the aged in recreational and care centers and in their homes and communities.

Field Education

Undergraduate field education enables students to apply theories learned in the classroom and develop the beginning skills in the practice of social work. Field education provides an opportunity for students to put into practice the knowledge, principles, values and skills that are essential as the foundation for social work. This learning experience is planned to be a generalist one in order to prepare graduates either to work under supervision in a variety of social work settings or to continue on to graduate social work education.

Each student will have the opportunity for an introductory social work field experience in the second semester of the junior year and a supervised field internship experience in both semesters of the senior year. All field education is taken concurrently with social work practice courses (SSS 352 in the junior year and SSS 453 and SSS 454 in the senior year.)

The junior year field practicum consists of a four-hour-per-week supervised observational experience in a social service agency in the metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. Students are required to complete a minimum of 48 hours during the spring semester. Discussion about the experience occurs in the first practice course. Students earn four credit hours for the practice course (SSS 352).

In the senior year, the student is assigned a field placement in one of the approved field placement agencies in the metropolitan Washington, D.C. area. During the 16 hours/week supervised internship experience, students gain practice experience with individuals, families, groups, communities, and organizations using a range of intervention modalities. Students are required to complete a minimum of 480 hours over the course of the academic year. While in the field, students are enrolled in SSS 465 and SSS 466, Undergraduate Concurrent Field Education Seminar I and II, which serves as a year long Integrative Seminar. Students earn four credit hours each semester for the senior practicum and integrative seminar combined. In addition, they earn three credit hours each semester for the senior year practice courses SSS 453 and SSS 454, which are taken concurrently. Grades for field education are based on the recommendations of the field instructor with the final grade assigned by the CUA faculty. Agencies and students are expected to arrange field learning experiences so they are in harmony with the academic calendar. Students in junior and senior year field placements are required to pay an additional fee for malpractice insurance.

Senior Comprehensive Assessment

In the Program in Social Work, the senior comprehensive assessment required by the university takes the form of a senior comprehensive paper. By university regulations, students receive pass, fail, or pass with honors on the comprehensive. The comprehensive is designed to allow students to integrate content from their social work courses as well as their liberal arts education. A student who fails to pass the senior comprehensive assessment must repeat the assessment, no earlier than 60 days following the most recent failure, until it is passed. No student may receive an undergraduate degree from the School of Arts and Sciences until the senior comprehensive assessment is satisfactorily completed.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

SSS

Course Title

101

Introduction to Social Work

223, 225

Human Behavior and the Social Environment I, II

302, 303

Social Welfare Policy I, II

326

Diversity in a Multicultural Society

340

Research Methods in Social Work

352, 453, 454

Social Work Practice I, II, III

465, 466

Undergraduate Concurrent Field Instruction I, II

490

Coordinating Seminar

497, 498, 499

Reading and Research in Soc Work

533

Feminist Issues in Social Work Intervention

545

An Introduction to the DSM-IV

547

Issues and Strategies in Serving Persons with Disabilities

554

Homelessness: Individual and Social Concerns

557

Catholic Social Thought and Contemporary Social Issues

 

Department of Sociology

Professors

Sandra L. Hanson; Bronislaw Misztal, Chair

Professors Emeriti

Raymond H. Potvin

Adjunct Professors

John F. Liddi; David Mutchler; Anthony Pogorelc; Laurie Samuel; Leszek J. Sibilski

Associate Professors

Enrique Pumar; Rev. Donald Paul Sullins

The Department of Sociology, one of the oldest in the United States, was founded in the mid-1890s. William J. Kerby and Paul Hanly Furfey were early chairs of the department. Programs are offered at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

The undergraduate program in Sociology, like its graduate equivalent, is organized around three principal areas:

  1. Public Policy Analysis, offering courses on poverty eradication; educational processes in various societies; ethnicity and race as major forces that hold society together or split it apart; urban America; disability, sports and gender policies; as well as economic sociology and social change;
  2. Criminology and Criminal Justice, offering courses on the sociology of law; international crime and terrorism; global threats and threat management; surveillance and penology; and sociology of organizations and law enforcement; and
  3. Global Processes, offering courses on various models of globalization and on fragmentation of modern markets; development of European cities; political and religious change, especially in the areas adjacent to the United States; civil society and social justice; and comparative analyses of contemporary societies, which focuses on Latin American and European societies.

In each of these areas students receive basic training in research methods and theory. Undergraduate education in sociology serves as an excellent conduit to professional positions in law enforcement, public policy, and social research, as well as preparation for successful application to law schools, graduate programs in sociology and social work, and professional schools. Within two years all our undergraduate students who wish to do so usually enter into advanced educational institutions.

Each major must complete the core curriculum of SOC 101, 102, 202 or 501, 301, 352, 451, 452, plus five additional courses in sociology (or related departments with approval), with a grade of C- or better in each course. Students are expected to take 202 in the sophomore year; 301 and 352 in the junior year; and 451 and 452 in the senior year.

Requirements for a minor in sociology include 101, 102, 202, 352, and two electives in other sociology courses.

Each major in sociology will be assigned a departmental adviser who will assist the student in making curricular choices to suit particular educational goals, and who must approve each semester's course selections. Students may elect one or two semesters of Independent Research (495, 496) in order to provide individually tailored programs. Advisers may approve related courses in other departments as part of the twelve courses required for the major in sociology. Up to six hours may be earned in supervised internships. Students planning to pursue graduate studies in sociology are strongly encouraged to enroll in Data Handling in Social Science (513).

The Department of Sociology offers qualified students a five-year B.A/M.A. degree. See the entry for Accelerated Degree Programs above in the School of Arts and Sciences section of these Announcements.

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

SOC

Course Title

101

Introduction to Sociology

102

Social Problems

202

Research Methods

204

Introduction to International Crime

205

Sociology of Crime

206

Marriage and the Family

208

Sociology of Delinquency

235

Sociology of Media

241

Religion in the Modern World

316

Poverty Eradication Policy

301

Statistical Analysis for Social Science I

305

Deviance

324

Social Stratification

   

331

Globalization and Social Movements

334

Capitalism, Globalization and Consumption

345

Sociology of Sports

   
   

352

Contemporary Sociological Theory

383

Global Disability Policies

365

Controlling America's Borders: Issues and Problems

371

Sociology of Deviance

373

Cross Cultural Gender Studies

401

Sociology of Organization

413

Sex and Society

423

Social Change

424

War and Conflict Resolution

430

The Cities of Europe

450

Race Relations in Complex Society

451, 452

Senior Coordinating Seminar

460

Political Sociology

473

Gender Across Societies

480

Sociology Internship

495-497

Independent Research

499

Selected Topics in Sociology

501

Research Design and Methods

503

Social Statistics

506

Statistical Analysis of Categorical Data

512

Comparative Theories of Societies

513

Data Handling in Social Science

528

Social Stratification and Mobility

530

Family Problems

534

Economic Sociology

549

Social Fragmentation

   

562

Formal Organizations

563

Modern Social Movements

583

Global Policies of Disability

Program in Theology and Religious Studies

Program Coordinator: Ms. Karen M. Korol, Assistant Dean, School of Theology and Religious Studies

In cooperation with the faculty of the School of Theology and Religious Studies, the School of Arts and Sciences offers the B.A. with a major in theology and religious studies. For more information on the School of Theology and Religious Studies, its faculty and graduate programs, see the School of Theology and Religious Studies section of the Graduate Studies Announcements.

History. From its foundation The Catholic University of America has given priority to theology and religious studies. It has emphasized programs that explore the Roman Catholic tradition of humanistic learning and that study its relevance to the needs of society and the Church. The Apostolic Constitution Ex Corde Ecclesiae (1990) insists that an authentically Catholic university in its study of theology carry on a dialogue with the cultures of the world as well as with the sciences and world religions. In 1929, Rev. John Montgomery Cooper founded the Department of Religion and Religious Education as part of the School of Arts and Sciences to introduce undergraduates to the critical and interdisciplinary understanding of religious beliefs and practices in world cultures. For 70 years, the curriculum has provided courses in the Catholic theological tradition and practices. In addition, it has also examined Orthodox and Protestant traditions of Christianity together with studies of Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Taoism, and Confucianism in the context of global societal developments.

After a review of programs and structures, the Board of Trustees approved a recommendation by the Academic Senate to establish a School of Religious Studies in September 1973. The department became part of this new school while continuing to offer courses to all undergraduates in the university. In 2002, the Board of Trustees, after the recommendation of the Academic Senate, voted to convert the departments of the School of Religious Studies into programs in a School of Theology and Religious Studies. By thus coordinating existing units, The Catholic University of America established a School of Theology and Religious Studies as a national center of academic research, instruction, and service. This school continues to provide courses for undergraduates who need to fulfill distribution requirements as well as for those wishing to major or minor in theology and religious studies.

As a result, the academic areas in the school introduce students to the liturgical, theological, and magisterial tradition of the Church and emphasize an interdisciplinary approach and collaboration with other schools of the university. The school's programs include an ecumenical and inter-religious dimension to all theological studies and engage in the exploration of relations between religion and culture. The school is committed to the promotion of informed efforts to work for justice and peace, both within the Church and in the world, in the light of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Distribution Requirements. To fulfill the distribution requirements for the bachelor's degree, undergraduate students in the School of Arts and Science must take four courses in theology and religious studies. Students in the professional schools must take three such courses. All students must take at least two introductory level courses (i.e., a TRS 200 level course), at least one of which must be within the Catholic Theological Tradition (TRS 200, 201, 210, 230, 240, 260 or 261). Further, students must take at least one course at the 300 level.

All students should develop patterns of courses that fit their academic interests and program, in consultation with their advisers. The 200 level courses serve as introductory courses in the areas of specialization within the School of Theology and Religious Studies: Biblical Studies; Church History; Moral Theology and Ethics; Liturgy and Sacrament; Spirituality, Ministry and Religious Education; Systematic Theology; and Religion and Culture. Upper level (300) courses treat more specialized questions within these same areas. The course numbering system reflects this arrangement-see chart under Course Numbering System below.

Professional Curriculum. Courses in theology and religious studies are regularly offered that comment upon the professional fields, such as nursing, the arts, business, economics, ecology, and public life. Undergraduates in the Schools of Architecture and Planning, Engineering, Music, and Nursing should consult their advisers to discuss appropriate sequences for their distribution requirements. Undergraduates who are considering vocations to the priesthood, religious life, or lay ministry in the Catholic Church may find courses relevant to their anticipated goals. Campus ministry offers social service opportunities, which complement the academic program. Some courses in the department also include reflective internships as a part of the course requirements.

Transfer Students. Students who transfer from other accredited institutions are welcome to apply prior courses in theology and religious studies to their distribution requirements in theology and religious studies here at CUA. They must apply for transfer credit through the Office of the Dean of Arts and Sciences who consults with the School of Theology and Religious Studies.

PROGRAMS FOR MAJORS AND MINORS

The School of Theology and Religious Studies offers programs that lead to the Bachelor of Arts degree in theology and religious studies through the School of Arts and Sciences. It also offers programs leading to the Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy degrees. Qualified students who major in theology and religious studies may, with the approval of the deans of the School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Theology and Religious Studies, anticipate entry into the Master of Arts program in their fourth year of undergraduate study. The bachelor's/master's degree sequence is recommended for those who wish to teach at the secondary school level. Consultation with the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Programs in the School of Theology and Religious Studies is necessary for entrance into the program.

Programs for Majors. In the context of a humanist education in the liberal arts, the Bachelor of Arts degree in theology and religious studies provides students with both a wide exposure to the areas of specialization within theology and religious studies, and an opportunity to delve more deeply into areas of special interest to them.

Admission. In order to be accepted as a major in theology and religious studies, students must have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 or better. In addition, at the completion of their sophomore year, they must have an average 3.0 GPA in theology and religious studies courses.

Courses. Students majoring in theology and religious studies must take TRS 101, a one-credit course that examines the differences between theology and religious studies and surveys the various types of scholarship within these fields. Beyond this, majors are required to complete at least 12 courses (36 credits) in theology and religious studies. At least five of these courses must be at the introductory (200) level; the introductory theology and study of religion courses (TRS 260 and TRS 280) are taken in sections reserved for TRS majors and minors. Furthermore, the five introductory courses must be chosen from five different areas of specialization within the School of Theology and Religious Studies: Biblical Studies; Church History; Moral Theology and Ethics; Liturgy and Sacrament; Spirituality; Systematic Theology; and Religion and Culture. Majors are also expected to take a senior capstone seminar that will involve a substantial research paper. This allows for six further courses that the student may chose, depending on his or her interests.

Comprehensives. Students who conclude the major course sequence must successfully finish two bachelor's comprehensive exams. These must be completed by April 1 for spring graduation and November 1 for January graduation. The first day of exams will cover material from the introductory level courses taken by the student (200 level). The second day of exams will cover the coursework that students have done at the upper levels (300 level and higher).

Double Majors. The school encourages students to pursue a double major in theology and religious studies along with another discipline, whether through the School of Arts and Sciences or other schools of the university. Double majors at the bachelor's level permit preparation for graduate work or professional occupation in interdisciplinary areas. In collaboration with the Department of Education, students concentrating in religion may take a major in secondary education, preparatory to teaching religion and theology at the high school level.

Peace Studies and Latin American Studies Minors. A major in theology and religious studies may be fruitfully combined with a minor either in Peace and Justice Studies or in Latin American and Latino Studies. The school offers courses that contribute to both programs. Further information is available from the undergraduate office of the School of Theology and Religious Studies.

Honors Students. Honors students who complete the entire sequence of three concentrations in humanities, philosophy, and the social sciences are expected to complete three further courses in theology and religious studies. One of these must be at the introductory (200) level and another must be an upper (300) level course. There is also a four-course Honors concentration specifically in the field of theology and religious studies.

Programs for Minors. Students can complete a minor in theology and religious studies by completing six courses in this field. At least three of these courses must be from the introductory (200) level. A minor in theology and religious studies provides an appropriate complement to majors in philosophy, history, English, politics, and music.

Graduate Programs. Information about graduate programs and courses in the School of Theology and Religious Studies is available in the Graduate Studies Announcements.

Undergraduate Certificate in Pastoral Ministry. The School of Theology and Religious Studies offers a two-year Certificate Program of coursework and supervised ministry that prepares CUA students for future ministry as catechists, religion teachers, youth ministers or campus ministers, in social concerns and other ecclesial ministries. The certificate from The Catholic University of America meets the requirements for lay ministry certification in most dioceses of the United States. Students who undertake this program will take six theology and religion courses, including TRS 355: The Mission of the Contemporary Catholic; TRS 357: Foundations of Religious Education or TRS 359: Teens, Church Today and Tomorrow; and TRS 453: The Practice of Pastoral Ministry. As a seventh course they must complete a one semester, three-credit internship in a local parish or church agency.

Course Numbering System. The course numbering system is designed to give a "decade" at each level (200, 300, 400) to an area of specialization within theology and religious studies. The numbering system is as follows:

00-19

Biblical Studies

00-09

Old Testament

10-19

New Testament

20-29

Church History

30-39

Moral Theology/Ethics

40-49

Liturgy and Sacraments

50-59

Spirituality/Ministry/Religious Education

60-79

Systematic Theology

80-99

Religion and Culture

80-89

Religious Studies

90-99

World Religions

Courses Offered

Please consult the Web site http://trs.cua.edu/courses/courses.cfm for descriptions of all courses offered within the program: http://trs.cua.edu/courses/schedule.cfm for courses offered in the current semester.

TRS

Course Title

101

Theology and Religious Studies (1 credit)

158 International Mission Experience

200

Introduction to the Old Testament

201 Faith Seeking Understanding

210

Introduction to the New Testament

220

Church Through the Ages: Paul to Luther

221

Church Through the Ages: Trent to Vatican II

230

Character, Choice, and Community

240

Christian Liturgy Prayer Sacrament

251

The Dynamics of Christian Spirituality

260

Christianity and Culture

261

Enduring Questions in Catholic Theology

280

The Religious Quest

290

World Religions

 

 

300

Narrative in the Old Testament

301 Introduction to Biblical Archeology
302 Women in the Bible
303 Creation in the Old Testament
304 The Psalms

310

The Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and Luke

311

The Gospel of John

312

The Letters of Paul

314

The New Testament and the Contemporary Church

315

Narrative in Synoptic Gospels

320A

Reform, Reformation, Reformation 1500-1610

321A

The Church in Africa

322

Christian Beginnings

323

The History of the Church from Constantine to the Great Schism

324A Women in the Christian Tradition

325

American Catholicism Since 1945

327

American Catholic History: Catholic Identities 1800-1970

328

Makers of Hispanic Catholic History

329

Devotionalism in U.S. Catholicism, 1850-1970

330

The Church and Social Issues

331 Foundations of Catholic Moral Thought

332

Contemporary Moral Issues and the Catholic Tradition

333

Biomedical and Health Care Issues

334

War, Peace, and Revolution: Christian Perspectives

335

Moral Dimensions of Family Life

337

Church and State in Catholic Theology

337B History of Christian Political Thought
338 War, Ethics and Film

340

Christian Celebration: The Mass

341

Sickness, Death, and Christian Ritual

342

The Sacraments of Initiation

343

Christian Feasts and Devotions

344 Spiritualities and Liturgies of the Eastern Churches

350

The Bible in Worship and Spirituality

351

Contemporary Christian Spirituality

352

Christian Marriage and Family Life

353

Religion and the Life Cycle

354

Religious Experience: Psychological and Theological Perspectives

355

The Mission of the Contemporary Catholic

356

Francis of Assisi: Prophet of Peace and of Creation

357

Foundations for Religious Education

359

Teenagers: The Church Today and Tomorrow

360

The Catholic Church Today

361

Vatican II: The Church in Council

363

Jesus as the Christ: Contemporary Perspectives

365

The Triune God

366

Continuity and Change in Catholicism

367A

Unity and Diversity: Theology in the Middle Ages

369

The Protestant Experience

370

Theologies of Liberation

371

Marriage and Annulments in the Catholic Church

373

Theology, Science, and Technologies

375

The Creeds

376 Mary, Mother of God, Mother of the Church
377 John Henry Newman: Life and Writings

380

Religion in American Culture

381

Ways of Peace in World Religions

382

Religion and Public Policy

383

Issues in Religious Studies

384

Sects/Cults/New Religious Movements

385

Religion and Ecology

386

Apocalypse: Religious and Cultural Meaning

387

Playing God: Genetics, Ecology, and Religion

390

Taoism and Confucianism

391

Introduction to Buddhism

392

Hinduism: Religion and Art

393

Classic Texts of World Religions

395

Christianity and the Challenge of Islam

396

Basic Jewish Texts

397

Introduction to Judaism

398

Introduction to Islam

399

Islamic Thought: Selected Topics

400

Special Topics in Old Testament

410

Special Topics in New Testament

420

Special Topics in Church History

430

Special Topics in Moral Theology/Ethics

440

Special Topics in Liturgy/Sacraments

450

Internship in Pastoral Ministry

451

Special Topics in Religious Ed

452

Special Topics in Spirituality

453

The Practice of Pastoral Ministry

454

Introduction to Hispanic Ministry

460

Special Topics in Theology

480

Special Topics in Religious Studies

490

Special Topics in World Religions

495

Capstone Seminar in Theology and Religious Studies

499

Independent Study in Theology and Religious Studies

Footnotes

[1] Students choose a minimum of three upper-division German electives.

[2] Span 450 is an addition to the core program in literature. Those students who elect this option must use one of their electives.

[3] Bilingual students should take Spanish 210 and 211 instead of Spanish 203 and 204.

[4] Majors will take ONE Latin American survey and ONE Peninsular survey, not both. They may replace one of these courses with Spanish 300.

[5] MUS 325, 326, 327 are offered in a three-semester sequence and may be taken in any order.