The Catholic University of America

School of Nursing

Officers of Instruction

Faculty

Nalini N.Jairath, Ph.D., R.N.
Associate Professor and Dean
Mary A.Paterson, Ph.D., R.N.
Associate Professor and Associate Dean
Janice Griffin Agazio, Ph.D., CPNP
Assistant Professor
Kathleen Buckley, Ph.D., R.N.
Associate Professor
Sister Rosemary Donley, Ph.D., CRNP, ANP, FAAN
Ordinary Professor
Janalyn Edmonds, Ph.D., R.N.
Assistant Professor
Sister Mary Jean Flaherty, S.C., Ph.D., R.N., FAAN.
Ordinary Professor
Marjorie Graziano, M.S.N., R.N., FNP.
Clinical Assistant Professor
Cynthia Knoll Grandjean, Ph.D., M.G.A., CRNP, ANP/GNP
Assistant Professor
Elizabeth Hawkins-Walsh, Ph.D., R.N., CPNP
Clinical Associate Professor
Lois M. Hoskins, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN
Professor Emerita
Eden Kan, Ph.D, R.N. Assistant Professor
Laurie Lemieux, M.S., R.N., WHNP
Clinical Instructor
Patricia McMullen, Ph.D., J.D., CNS, CRNP Associate Professor
Barbara Moran,Ph.D., R.N., CNM, FACCE
Assistant Professor
Janet Merritt, Ph.D., R.N.
Assistant Professor
Sister Mary Elizabeth O'Brien, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN
Ordinary Professor
Sister Maria Salerno, O.S.F., Ph.D., APRN-BC, APN/GNP.
Associate Professor
Jean E. Toth, Ph.D., R.N.
Associate Professor
Teresa Walsh, Ph.D., B.S.N., R.N. Assistant Professor

Associates of the Faculty

Anna C Alt-White, Ph.D. R.N
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Denise Baugh, Pharm.D, .M.B.A.
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Jill Dombrowski, Ph.D. R.N.
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Miriam Erice, B.S.N., M.Ed., R.N., BC
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Mourine Evans, B.S.N.,M.S.
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Joyce Johnson, DNSc., R.N., FAAN
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Donna Knauth ,Ph.D. R.N.C
Research Assistant Professor
Fredric Lombardo, Pharm.D., M.S., RPh, BCPS, BCNSP, BCOP
Adjunct Professor
Alice Myers, M.S.
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Frank Pucino, Pharm.D., BCPS, FDPGEC, FASHP
Adjunct Professor
Carmen Ramirez, Ph.D., R.N.
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Eileen Sarsfield, M.S.N., R.N.
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Rita Seifert ,Ph.D. Adjunct Assistant Professor
Janet Southby, Ph.D., R.N., ANC
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Carole Stone, M.S.N., R.N. CPNP
Adjunct Assistant Professor

Clinical Associates

Clinical Associates to the School of Nursing vary by semester.

History

The School of Nursing traces its beginning to the summer of 1932 when The Catholic University of America for the first time offered a group of professional courses in nursing education. Because of the demand, the work was continued during the following academic year and in April 1933 the Board of Trustees authorized a curriculum leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education. The first degree was conferred in 1934. The Division of Nursing Education, which offered this program, was approved for active membership in the Association of Collegiate Schools of Nursing in June 1935. The Division of Public Health Nursing, offering a curriculum leading to the baccalaureate degree, was initiated in September 1935. In November 1935, the Board of Trustees accepted the recommendation of Bishop James Hugh Ryan that the two divisions be organized as one of the professional schools of the university. The programs of study leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education and Bachelor of Science in Public Health Nursing were approved. The school was subsequently expanded to include basic professional nursing in addition to the program for registered nurses. In 1939 the Providence Hospital School of Nursing, Washington, D.C., became the Providence Division of the School of Nursing Education and during the next decade gradually moved toward complete identification with the university. In 1949 the university assumed full responsibility for the undergraduate program.

The degree of Master of Science in Nursing was introduced in 1951. The current program prepares nurses for advanced practice roles in a clinical specialty, with students prepared as nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and educators. A program leading to the degree Doctor of Nursing Science was initiated in 1968.

It was one of the first of its kind in the country and graduates hold major leadership positions in education, health care administration and research. In the spring of 2006, the D.N.Sc. program was converted to a Ph.D. granting program. The focus of the doctoral program remains on clinical investigation and development of expert clinicians who can assume leadership positions in many different areas.

Most recently, in 2007 the school added a Doctor of Nursing Practice, DNP, program that prepares expert clinicians and nursing leaders.

The school is recognized for its program offerings, the quality of faculty and commitment to diversity and improving the care of vulnerable populations. Graduates remain the school?s greatest strength because of leadership, knowledge, clinical expertise, and commitment to continuous learning and improvement.

All academic programs are fully accredited and approved by appropriate external review bodies.

Mission

Strengthened by a rich heritage of Catholic teachings and Christian values, the mission of the School of Nursing is (a) to prepare professionally educated nurses who are capable of the moral, intellectual, and professional leadership needed to provide continuing quality in clinical nursing care, in nursing education, in nursing research, and in nursing service; and, (b) to advance nursing knowledge and skill through scientific inquiry and other scholarly activity.

Goals

The four specific educational goals of the School of Nursing, as identified by the faculty, are:

1. Educational programs are implemented to meet the mission of the School of Nursing and the university, the standards set by the profession and societal needs.

2. The climate and environment in the School of Nursing facilitates faculty and student research and scholarly activities.

3. A competitive market position is maintained to enroll a sufficient number of qualified students of diverse backgrounds to support the excellence of the educational programs.

4. Contributions to the health care of people are made through an emphasis on Christian, moral, and spiritual value systems within the context of Catholic teachings.

Master of Science in Nursing Program

Aim

The aim of the Master of Science in Nursing Program is to prepare students as advanced practice nurses, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists or educators. The purposes of the program are:1. to prepare individuals capable of moral and intellectual leadership to provide advanced practice nursing to individuals and populations across the lifespan, and2. to develop and extend advanced practice nursing knowledge and skill through the utilization of evidenced-based practice models. The curriculum at the master's level is also directed toward developing interest and skill in research, commitment to continual personal and professional growth and to providing leadership in the development of advanced practice nursing.

Goal

The Master of Science in Nursing builds upon baccalaureate education in nursing and prepares students for leadership roles in the fields of advanced practice nursing and/or nursing education.

Terminal Objectives

Upon completion of the M.S.N. program, the graduate will have:

1. Acquired advanced knowledge from the sciences and the humanities to support evidence-based advanced practice nursing;

2. Integrated nursing theory as the foundation for advanced practice nursing;

3. Demonstrated expertise in a selected role within a specialized area of advanced practice nursing;

4. Acquired advanced knowledge and skills to use and disseminate the findings of nursing research;

5. Acquired advanced knowledge and skills to effect optimum delivery of health care services;

6. Demonstrated ethical behavior and respect for Judeo-Christian values; and

7. Acquired a foundation for doctoral study.

School of Nursing Specific Admission Requirements


The Catholic University School of Nursing employs a "whole person" philosophy for evaluation of applicants for admission to the Master of Science in Nursing program.To be considered for admission, in addition to meeting University admission requirements, at a minimum, an applicant must:

1. Possess a baccalaureate degree in nursing from an accredited college or university offering a program in nursing accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. (Exceptions may be made on a case-by-case basis for international students or those educated in other countries).

2. Graduates of programs not accredited by the NLNAC or CCNE must have transcripts evaluated and comparability to an American BSN established. Evaluation may be conducted by either the the World Education Services (www.wes.org) or the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools (www.cgfns.org).

3. Present transcripts of undergraduate study that give evidence of academic ability. A GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale is preferred, as well as an average GPA of 3.0 in the nursing major.

4. Have completed a graduate-level statistics course within the past five years or be registered for such a course during the first semester of study.

5. Be a registered nurse in a state or jurisdiction of the United States, without restrictions. (Applicants should be eligible for registration in D.C., Maryland and/or Virginia since the vast majority of clinical placements occur in these jurisdictions).

6. Have acquired some post-baccalaureate nursing experience relevant to the proposed area of clinical practice. (The amount of experience required may vary depending on the particular field of study.)

7. Ensure that the three letters of recommendation required by the University include (a) a recommendation from a former dean,faculty member or academic advisor familiar with the applicant's academic performance and (b) a separate recommendation from a current or former supervisor in a clinical practice setting.

8. Submit scores for Graduate Record Examination taken within the past 5 years if seeking financial support through the School of Nursing scholarship and loan programs.

9. Must achieve at least a 580 (paper-based test) or 213 (computer-based test) score on the TOEFL if applying as an international students from a basic program where English is not the language of instruction .

10. May be required to take intensive English courses and/or other additional courses as recommended by the academic adviser or the dean if concerns about English language proficiency exist.

11. Should verify post-M.S.N. degree eligiblity requirements for certification examinations for advanced practice nursing roles, if the B.S.N. program was not accredited by the NLNAC or CCNE.

12. Meet the School of Nursing's Health-Related Behavioral Standards for clinical programs.

NB. Applicants who do not meet the requirements for regular admission as degree-seeking candidates may be eligible for provisional/conditional admission.

General Policies for the M.S.N. Program

Coursework. A program of study is planned individually to meet the particular needs of each student, in accord with the student's field of study and career goals. Transfer of graduate work earned at another university will be considered only after the student has completed one full-time semester (or its equivalent) of graduate work at The Catholic University of America in accordance with the transfer policy of the university. Graduate courses in nursing are not open to challenge.

Grading. A grade point average of 3.0 is required for retention and graduation. In general, a grade of C is passing but marginal at the graduate level. A grade of C in clinical courses is not acceptable; students who earn C grades may repeat clinical courses once.

Residence. Students admitted to graduate study at the master's level must complete degree requirements within five years from the date of initial enrollment. Continuous enrollment must be maintained unless a written leave of absence has been granted.

School-Based Financial Support: In addition to University based aid, the School of Nursing has limited funds via traineeships, school-based scholarships and special federal programs. The availability of funds varies from year to year. Applicants for any funding must complete a FAFSA, have current GRE scores (i.e. less than 5 yrs old at time of program admission), and must reapply for funding annually. Additional information is available via the CUA School of Nursing Web site (http://nursing.cua.edu).

Clinical Policies

Eligibility Requirements For Placement In Clinical Settings

To be guaranteed a slot and to determine the number of sections required for clinical courses,pre-registration is required for clinical courses. Students who do not pre-register by the last day of class in the semester previous to the planned clinical will be placed on a wait list and are not guaranteed admission to the course.

Assignment of Clinical Placements: In the event that an agency declines to accept a student for clinical placement, the SON will make reasonable good faith attempts to place the student in a different setting. If the SON is unable obtain clinical placements for the student after two attempts within a given semester or three attempts over two semestersbecause ofspecific studentbehaviorswhich violate agency policy, the student may be administratively withdrawn from the SON.

Criminal Behavior And Background Check Policy

Criminal background checks are mandatory for all undergraduate students prior to the start of their clinical coursework. They may be required of graduate students if required by the clinical agency. The SON and clinical agencies reserve the right to review the results of the criminal background check and to deny placement in a clinical setting on the basis of these results.

Evidence of past or present criminal behavior identified through the background check or through other documented evidence of criminal behavior may lead to administrative sanctions up to, and including dismissal from the School of Nursing. The procedures for conducting criminal background checks are provided to students through the Office of the Dean.

Health And Basic Life Support Requirements

Students must report, immediately in writing, any changes in health status which impact their safety, the safety of patients or those whom the student encounters, or which significantly affect their progression in the program to the pertinent Associate Dean.

Students are expected to comply with all agency requirements for placement in the clinical setting. These include documentation of health and immunization requirements and current cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certification and may include drug/toxicology screening.

Failure to comply with these requirements may result in withdrawal from clinical courses with resultant effect upon the progression in the program.

Licensure: Registered Nurses in any clinical nursing program may be required to obtain licensure as Registered Nurses in the jurisdiction of their clinical placement.

Treatment of Information Regarding Health History and Past Criminal History

As a condition of placement in the clinical setting, the SON reserves the right to require that students sign a waiver allowing the SON to release pertinent health or background information to the supervising faculty member, or clinical associates and to the clinical placement site if any of the following conditions exist: (a)removal from prior clinical placements due to behavior or health concerns, (b)past health history suggesting elevated risk for substance abuse, (c) past or chronic health condition which with acute exacerbation may affect ability to provide safe care or (d)non-academically based disciplinary action by the SON or University

Clinical Standards for Admission, Academic Progression, and Graduation in Undergraduate and Graduate Nursing Programs.

By accepting admission and enrolling in the School of Nursing, the student certifies that he/she understands, meets at the time of admission, and continues to meet the essential eligibility requirement for clinical placement. These requirements pertain to (a) candor, (b) health-related behavioral standards, and (c) eligibility for placement in clinical settings.

Candor

Candor is defined as full disclosure of pertinent information as well as correction of inaccuracies or misperceptions. All students must complete a health clearance form which requires disclosure of any health conditions which may affect the student's ability to enter clinical settings or the ability of the School of secure clinical placements.

Students in nursing programs with a clinical component will be required tosubmit to a criminal background check and to fully disclose their relevant health history that may impact their health or safety in a clinical setting, or the health or safety of those around them.This may include, but is not limited to, any history of chemical dependency/substance use (i.e. alcohol, drugs, controlled substances).

Whether or not they represent a current threat to practice,disciplinary action or dismissal from the School of Nursing may result fromfailing to fully discloserelevant health history,criminal backgroundandfalsification or material omission of information.

Health-Related Behavioral Standards

In accordance with law and University policy, no qualified individual with a disability shall, on the basis of that disability, be excluded from participation in The Catholic University of America programs or activities. The SON in accord with University policy will provide reasonable accommodation to a qualified individual with a disability. To obtain accommodations, individuals must request them from the Office of Disability Services

Admission and continuation in the SON programs is contingent on general abilities, behavioral and social attributes, and the ability to professionally manage stressful situations.The requiredbehavioral attributesare outlined below:

General Abilities: The student is expected to possess functional use of the senses of vision, touch, hearing, and smell so that data received by the senses may be integrated, analyzed, and synthesized in a consistent and accurate manner. A student must also possess the ability to perceive pain, pressure, temperature, position, vibration, andmovement that are important to the student's ability to gather significant information needed to effectively evaluate patients. A student must be able to respond promptly to urgent situations that may occur during clinical training activities and must not hinder the ability of other members of the health care team to provide prompt treatment and care to patients.

Observational Ability:The student must have sufficient capacity to make accurate visual observations and interpret them in the context of laboratory studies, medication administration, and patient care activities. In addition, the student must be able to document these observations and maintain accurate records.

Communication Ability: The student must communicate effectively to elicit information and to translate that information to others. Each student must have the ability to read, write, comprehend and speak the English language to facilitate communication with patients, their family members, and other professionals in health care settings. In addition, the student must be able to maintain accurate patient records, present information in a professional, logical manner and provide patient counseling and instruction to effectively care for patients and their families. The student must communicate effectively verbally and in writing with instructors and other students in the classroom setting as well.This requires verbal abilities , control of nonâ??verbal behaviors which limit communication and the ability to respond to non-verbal cues from patients, fellow students, and instructors.

Motor Ability:The student must be able to perform gross and fine motor movements with sufficient coordination needed to perform complete physical examinations utilizing the techniques of inspection, palpation, percussion, auscultation, and other diagnostic maneuvers. A student must develop the psychomotor skills reasonably needed to perform or assist with procedures, treatments, administration of medication, management and operation of diagnostic and therapeutic medical equipment, and such maneuvers to assist with patient care activities such as lifting, wheel chair guidance, and mobility. The student must have sufficient levels of neuromuscular control and eye-to-hand coordination as well as possess the physical and mental stamina to meet the demands associated with satisfactory and safe performance in the clinical and classroom settings including performing CPR if necessary.

Intellectual, Conceptual, and Quantitative Abilities: The student must be able to develop and refine problem-solving skills that are crucial to practice as a nurse. Problem solving involves the abilities to measure, calculate, reason, analyze, and synthesize objective and subjective data, and to make decisions, often in a time urgent environment, that reflect consistent and thoughtful deliberation and sound clinical judgment. Each student must demonstrate mastery of these skills and possess the ability to formulate sound judgment in patient assessment, intervention, evaluation, teaching, and setting short and long term goals.

Behavioral and Social Attributes:Compassion, integrity, motivation, effective interpersonal skills, and concern for others are personal attributes required of those in the nursing programs. Comfort with and acceptance of the role of a nurse functioning under supervision of a clinical instructor or preceptor is essential for a nursing student. The student must possess the skills required for full utilization of the student's intellectual abilities; the exercise of good judgment; the prompt completion of all responsibilities in the classroom and clinical settings; and the development of mature, sensitive, and effective relationships with patients and other members of the health care team. Each student must be able to exercise stable, sound judgment and to complete assessment and interventional activities. The ability to establish rapport and maintain sensitive, interpersonal relationships with individuals, families, and groups from a variety of social, emotional, cultural and intellectual backgrounds is critical for practice as a nurse. The student must be able to adapt to changing environments; display flexibility; accept and integrate constructive criticism given in the classroom and clinical settings; effectively interact in the clinical setting with other members of the healthcare team; and learn to function cooperatively and efficiently in the face of uncertainties inherent in clinical practice.

Ability to Manage Stressful Situations:The student must be able to adapt to and function effectively to stressful situations in both the classroom and clinical settings, including emergency situations. Students will encounter multiple stressors while in the nursing programs. These stressors may be (but are not limited to) personal, patient care/family, faculty/peer, and or program related.

Unsafe Practice

Unsafe practice is defined as behavior which threatens, or has the potential to threaten, the safety of a client, another student, a faculty member, or other health care provider in the clinical placement.

Students are not allowed to practice in a clinical setting without the knowledge or supervision of a faculty member.

Students who exhibit potentially unsafe practice during a clinical experience may be immediately withdrawn from the clinical setting. This decision may be made bythe clinical faculty or at the request of the clinical agency.

Students who are at risk for unsafe practice may also be prevented from attending their clinical practicum or experience,until theunsafe practice concern has been investigated and satisfactorily resolved. Exact procedures for reporting, documenting,investigating and resolving concerns regarding unsafe practice are found in the SON students clinical practice guidelines.

If the concern cannot be , resolved,the studentmay be subject to additional administrative sanctionsand may be subject to administrative dismissal from the program and the SON.

The student has the right to follow the published University procedures in the event of course failure or program dismissal.

Clinical/Lab Attendance

1. Clinical/Lab attendance is mandatory.

2. Unexcused absences will not be accepted. The composite course grade will be lowered by one (1) grade level for each unexcused absence (i.e., A to A-). Excused absences are those defined in the course syllabus and examination policies of the relevant clinical courses.

3. One excused absence, while accepted, will necessitate a make-up assignment at the discretion of the faculty. Failure to complete the assignment will lower the composite course grade by one (1) grade level (i.e., A to A-). Further excused absences may affect the student grade and possibly progression in the program.

4. The student is expected to notify the appropriate persons, as identified in specific courses, of an emergency requiring an absence or tardiness prior to the beginning of the clinical/lab experience. The student is responsible to be aware of the specific requirements for each course and to follow those procedures.

5. Habitual tardiness to clinical/lab, defined as more than one occurrence, will result in lowering of the composite course grade by one level (i.e., A to A-) for each occurrence.

HIPAA Adherence

All students are expected to comply with the requirementsof the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) as applied to clinical education.

Failure to adhere to these expectations may result in immediate removal from the clinical settings and additional academic sanctions including course failure and if necessary dismissal.

Specifically, it is expected thatall students in SON arrange to completetraining on HIPAA prior to participating in clinical practica or rotations; if this training is not provided by the clinical agencyas part of the orientation process, the student is expected to complete the CUA HIPAA tutorial (http://counsel.cua.edu/employment/publications/)

Students are expected to maintain the privacy of individually identifiable

health information (IIHI ) by taking the following steps to protect against disclosure of IIHI:

Studentsin a clinical setting must ensure that they do not bring IIHI back acquired during their clinical coursework into the classroom. Students are expected toremove identifyinginformation when discussing their clinical experiences as part ofcoursework.

Students should not retain any IIHI after the need to use it has ended.

IIHI must be used only for research and/or education. Students must not share or discuss

information outside the educational setting.

Students are expected to follow the HIPAA guidelines of the clinical placement setting. Students should read, understand, sign and follow confidentiality and privacy policy statements, which will vary from site to site. For example, a health care facility or clinical site may have a strict rule prohibiting taking any IIHI from the setting back to the classroom.

Student Responsibility

Attendance. The faculty and administration in the School of Nursing consider attendance in class necessary to master the body of knowledge needed for safe clinical practice and adequate preparation for licensure. Therefore, class and clinical/lab attendance is mandatory. The responsibility for prompt and regular class and clinical/lab attendance rests upon the individual student. Professors are responsible for establishing and communicating policy regarding documentation and consequences of absenteeism in their individual classes. This may include requiring authentication of unavoidable absences and the inability for a student to receive a passing grade.

Transportation to Agencies. The student is expected to assume responsibility for transportation in connection with the clinical practice, community health practice and field trips. Public transportation is often available at these sites.

Insurance. All students in clinical programs are required to carry malpractice insurance. It is available through the university. This insurance applies only for clinical practice while enrolled in university courses. It does not cover students involved in personal employment. See Fees and Expenses in the General Information section of these Announcements.

Health Clearance. The student is required to meet School of Nursing health requirements prior to admission and prior to entering clinical coursework.

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, CPR. The student is required to meet basic CPR requirements prior to entering clinical coursework.

M.S.N. Specialties

MSN specialties fall within major areas of advanced practice specialization: (a) primary care with preparation for nurse practitioner roles, (b) population-based care with preparation for nurse specialist roles, and (c) combined care with preparation for integration of the nurse practitioner and clinical nurse specialist roles. All specialty programs are designed to enable students to meet the current graduate level educational requirements for the appropriate certification examinations. Students may follow a full-time or part-time plan of study.

Primary Care of Individuals (Nurse Practitioner Role)

The nurse practitioner specialties meet the nurse practitioner program and curricular guidelines endorsed by the National Task Force on Quality for Nurse Practitioner Education and the American Nurses Credentialing Center, ANCC, a subsidiary of the American Nurses Association and the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, AANP. Program content is congruent with Nurse Practitioner Primary Care Competencies in Specialty Areas. The course sequence provides the theoretical context and the clinical experiences required to practice as a nurse practitioner and to sit for certification in the selected field of advanced practice nursing.

Adult Nurse Practitioner(ANP) Specialty Program Option. The Adult Nurse Practitioner Program option prepares advanced practice nurses as primary care providers to manage the health of individuals from adolescence through old age. Emphasis is on health promotion, illness prevention and management of acute and chronic illnesses. Clinical and coursework prepare the graduate to practice independently and collaboratively with other health care professionals as an ANP.

The curriculum includes a minimum of 540 hours of supervised clinical practice in a variety of settings. Graduates are prepared to provide comprehensive care in settings that include but are not limited to private practices, clinics, community health centers, hospitals, businesses, managed care organizations and governmental agencies. This program meets the nurse practitioner curriculum guidelines of the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, NONPF, Advanced Nursing Practice, Curriculum Guidelines and Program Standards for Nurse Practitioner Education and the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

Upon completion of course requirements, graduates of the master's and post-master's programs are eligible to sit for ANCC Nurse Practitioner and American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, AANP, Adult NP Certification Exams. (38 credits)

Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) Specialty Program Option. The Family Nurse Practitioner Program option prepares advanced practice nurses as primary care providers to work in a variety of clinical settings including private practices, clinics, community health centers, hospitals and businesses, managed care organizations and governmental agencies. Upon completion of the program, the graduate will be able to offer comprehensive, age-appropriate and age-specific quality health care that addresses the multiple needs of individuals and families across the lifespan. The curriculum includes more than 700 hours of supervised clinical practice in a variety of clinical settings. This program meets the nurse practitioner curriculum guidelines of the National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculties, Advanced Nursing Practice and Program Standards for Nurse Practitioner Education and the American Nurses Credentialing Center Family Nurse Practitioner Certification Criteria. Graduates are eligible for national certification through the ANCC. After successful completion of their certifying examination, graduates are eligible for licensure as an FNP in all states. (44 Credits)

Geriatric Nurse Practitioner (GNP) Specialty Program Option. The Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Program option is designed to reflect national health care trends and to prepare nurses to serve America's aging population. The GNP is able to assume a role as a health care provider dedicated to improving the health of the elderly. GNPs serve the elderly and their families in an extensive range of practice settings including but not limited to private practices, clinics, community health centers, hospitals, long-term care facilities and managed care organizations. GNPs focus on health maintenance and acute and chronic disease processes that are specific to the elderly and are sensitive and responsive to the complex and diverse health needs of a growing elderly population. Clinical work and coursework prepare the GNP to practice independently and collaboratively with other health care professionals.

The curriculum includes a minimum of 540 hours of supervised clinical practice in a variety of settings. Upon completion of course requirements, graduates of the master's and post-master's programs are eligible to sit for the ANCC and AANP Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Certification Exams. (38 Credits)

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner (PNP) Program Option. The Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Progrm option is designed to prepare pediatric nurse practitioners for advanced practice and leadership roles in the primary care of children and adolescents in a variety of settings. Students gain the knowledge and skills to practice in the traditional areas of pediatric primary care as well as have opportunities for expanded training in school-based health care, in the behavioral/mental health of children and in interdisciplinary community-based faculty practice settings. The program meets national nurse practitioner program and curricular guidelines endorsed by the National Task Force on Quality for Nurse Practitioner Education. Graduates are eligible to sit for certification by the Pediatric Nursing Certification Board and the ANCC. (39 Credits)

Population-based Care ( Nurse Specialist Role)

Advanced Community/Public Health Nurse Educator Program Option. This program option prepares specialists in advanced community/public health nursing to teach in associate and baccalaureate degree programs, staff development programs, community health programs, health care organizations and managed care programs. Students develop clinical and educational skills that improve community-based care of vulnerable people and reduce health disparities. The program integrates the principles of population-focused care; learning theory; teaching strategies; trans-cultural nursing; program evaluation; ethical, legal and financial dimensions of managing health disparities; and evaluation of health care outcomes in reducing disparities. Graduates are eligible for ANCC certification as advanced public/community health nurse specialists and are academically eligible to sit for the NLN Certified Nurse Educator examination. (45 Credits)

Immigrant, Refugee and Global Health Nurse Specialist Program Option. This program option prepares advanced community/public health nurses to meet population health needs and improve access to health care, decrease barriers and reduce health disparities. Recognizing that many community/public health problems in the United States are also world health problems, the program focuses on global health and addresses the health status of immigrants and refugees, a vulnerable, growing subset of the population within the United States. The curriculum is developed around the core functions and competencies of public health nursing, and includes theoretical content and clinical experiences. Graduates are eligible to sit for the American Nurses Credentialing Center advanced public/community health nursing certification examination. (48 credits)

Psychiatric-Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist Program Option. This program option is designed to meet the needs of psychiatric-mental health populations in the community. Graduates are prepared to function as advanced practice nurses in community-based and/or school-based psychiatric-mental health settings; work with the underserved and those from diverse cultures; and work as primary mental health care providers and/or program directors. The curriculum provides flexible programming, expert multidisciplinary faculty and consultants, and excellent clinical sites to optimize learning. Graduates are eligible to sit for ANCC certification as adult or child-adolescent psychiatric mental health clinical nurse specialists. (42 credits).

Adult Health Clinical Nurse Specialist/Nurse Educator, CNS/EDU Program Option. The Adult Health Clinical Specialist/Nurse Educator program option provides theoretical and practice opportunities that build upon the knowledge and experiences that students bring to the curriculum. The program of study fosters the development of advanced practice clinical skills in caring for adult populations, as well as the development of skills in the art of teaching.

The course requirements include clinical and practicum experiences supporting the clinical specialist and educator roles. Graduates of this program are prepared to function as adult health clinical specialists and nurse educators in academic or health care settings. Graduates meet eligibility requirements for CNS certification. (40 credits)

Blended Role Program Option

This program option combines the FNP and a graduate specialty in advanced Community/Public Health NURSING (Promoting Healthy Families In Vulnerable Communities emphasis). This program prepares students for the blended role of family nurse practitioner and ADVANCED community/public health nurse specialist. Graduates are family nurse practitioners prepared to assess, manage, treat and evaluate the health status of vulnerable individuals, families and communities. They also are community/public health nurse specialists educated to plan, direct, implement and evaluate population-based, family-oriented health care in culturally sensitive ways. The curriculum, grounded in Healthy People 2010, is consistent with the core competencies of the American Public Health Association and the American Nurses Credentialing Center and meets the standards of the Association of Community Health Nurse Educators and the National Organization of Nurse Practitioners Faculties. Graduates are eligible for ANCC certification as advanced public/community health nurse specialists and family nurse practitioners. (56 credits).

M.S.N. Specialty Curriculum Requirements

Curriculum

Overview

The M.S.N. program is based upon a tiered curriculum. The tiered approach provides quality educational experiences, while ensuring adherence to certification requirements for the various areas of specialization. First tier coursework is mandatory for all M.S.N. students. Second tier coursework consists of science, ethics and support/cognate courses, which may vary by specialty. Third tier coursework consists of clinically focused courses required for specialty practice and blended role programs. NB: Given the changing nature of certification requirements and required content, the curriculum and associated plans are subject to midifcation by the School of Nursing as determined within the academic year.

First Tier Core Courses
Credits
N708 Research in Nursing: Methods & Outcomes
3
N895 Capstone Research Project
3
N701 Health Promotion
2
N661 Theoretical Foundations for Advanced Practice
2
N663 Health Care Policy, Organizations & Finance
3
N657 Advanced Health Assessment
3
N789 Advanced Practice Role Seminar
1
Second Tier Courses (Vary according to program)
Credits
Science
3-9
Ethics
3
Support/Cognate Courses
0-6

Specialty Program Option Specific Courses (Nurse Practitioner)

Adult Nurse Practitioner

Required Second Tier courses
Credits
PHIL 505 Moral Issues in Health Care
3
NURS 610 Pharmacology for Advanced Nursing Practice
3
NURS 698 Pathophysiology
3
NURS 766 Family and Culture
2/3
Required Third Tier courses
NURS 782 Management of Health Problems I
3
NURS 783 Management of Health Problems II
3
NURS 784 Nurse Practitioner Practicum I
1
NURS 785 Nurse Practitioner Practicum II
1
NURS 786 Nurse Practitioner Practicum III
1

Family Nurse Practitioner

Required Second Tier courses
Credits
PHIL 505 Moral Issues in Health Care
3
NURS 610 Pharmacology for Advanced Nursing Practice
3
NURS 698 Pathophysiology
3
NURS 766 Family and Culture
2
Required Third Tier courses
NURS 735 Perinatal Health
1
NURS 780 Ped Nurse Practitioner
Seminar/Practicum I
4

Nurs 781 Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Seminar and Practicum II

1
NURS 782 Management of Health Problems I
3
NURS 783 Management of Health Problems II
3
NURS 784 Nurse Practitioner Practicum I
1
NURS 785 Nurse Practitioner Practicum I
1
NURS 786 Nurse Practitioner Practicum III
1

Geriatric Nurse Practitioner

Required Second Tier courses
Credits
PHIL 505 Moral Issues in Health Care
3
NURS 610 Pharmacology for Advanced Nursing Practice
3
NURS 698 Pathophysiology
3
Support course in Geriatrics
3
Required Third Teir Courses
Credits
NURS 782 Management of Health Problems I
3
NURS 783 Management of Health Problems II
3
NURS 784 Nurse Practitioner Practicum I
1
NURS 785 Nurse Practitioner Practicum II
1
NURS 786 Nurse Practitioner Practicum III
1

Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

Required Second Tier courses
Credits
NURS 610 Pharmacology for Advanced Nursing Practice
3
NURS 698 Pathophysiology
3
PHIL 505 Moral Issues in Health Care
3
Elective
3
Required Third Tier courses
NURS 780 Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Seminar/Practicum I
4

NURS 781 Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Seminar/Practicum II

1
Nurs 781A Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Practicum II
1
NURS 779 Child and Adolescents with Special Needs
1
NURS 784 Nurse Practitioner Practicum I
1
NURS 785 Nurse Practitioner Practicum II
1
NURS 786 Nurse Practitioner Practicum II I
1
or
NURS 787 Primary Care of the Newborn
1

Specialty Program Option Specific Courses (Clinical Specialist/Clinical Nurse Specialist)

Adult Health Clinical Specialist/Nurse Educator

Required Second Tier courses
Credits
PHIL 505 Moral Issues in Health Care
3
NURS 610 Pharmacology for Advanced Nursing Practice
3
NURS 698 Pathophysiology
3
Required Third Tier courses
NURS 782 Management of Health Problems I
3
NURS 783 Management of Health Problems II
3
NURS 797 Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum I
1
NURS 798 Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum II
1
NURS 835 Program Development and Evaluation
3
NURS 836 Education Seminar and Practicum
3

Immigrant, Refugee and Global Health Clinical Nurse Specialist

Required Second Tier courses
Credits
ANTH 741 Health, Society and Culture
3
NURS 664 Principles of Epidemiology
3
NURS 926 Health Policy Formulation & Analysis
3
TRS 632A Christian Social Ethics
3
NURS 686 Health Care Finance
3
NURS 687 Managing Health Information I
3
Required Third Tier courses for this program
NURS 674 Population-Based Health Care Management
1
NURS 675 Population-Based Health Care Practicum
1
NURS 676 Vulnerable Women/Families in Community
3
NURS 627 Health Policy Practicum
2
NURS 684 Global, Immigrant, & Refugee Health
3
NURS 685 Global, Immigrant, & Refugee Women & Families Practicum
2

Community/Public Health Nurse Specialist Educator

Required Second Tier courses for this program
Credits
EDUC 554 Instructional Design
3
EDUC 525 Psychology of Learning: Implications for Instructional Design
3
NURS 664 Principles of Epidemiology
3
TRS 632A Christian Social Ethics
3
Required Third Tier courses for this program
NURS 674 Population-Based Health Care Management
1
NURS 675 Population-Based Health Care Management Practicum
1
NURS 676 Vulnerable Women/Families in Community
3
NURS 677 Vulnerable Women/Families in Community Practicum
2
NURS 678 Health Care Management: Addressing Disparities
3
NURS 679 Health Care Management: Addressing Disparities Practicum
2
NURS 835 Program Development and Evaluation
3
NURS 683 Educator: Community/Public Health Practicum
2

Psychiatric-Mental Health Clinical Nurse Specialist (Adult or Child/Adolescent Focus)

Required Second Tier courses
Credits
NURS 608 Psychopharmacology
1
NURS 610 Pharmocology for Advanced Nursing Practice
3
PSYCH 714 Introduction to Neuropsychology
3
ANTH 642 Ethnopsychology
3
PHIL 505 Moral Issues in Health care
3
Required Third Tier courses for this program
NURS 741 Bio-Behavioral Psychiatric Nursing
3
NURS 742 Mental Health of the Individual
3
NURS 743 Mental Health of the Family
3
or
NURS 756 Mental Health of the Group
3
NURS 746 Practicum in Community Mental Health I
1
NURS 747 Practicum in Community Mental Health II
2

Blended Role Program Option

FNP and Advanced Community/Public Health Nursing (Promoting Healthy Families In Vulnerable Communities emphasis).

Required Second Tier courses for this program
Credits
NURS 610 Pharmacology for Advanced Nursing Practice
3
TRS 632A Christian Social Ethics
3
NURS 698 Pathophysiology
3
NURS 766 Family and Culture
2
NURSE 779 Child and Adolescents with Special Needs
1
NURS 664 Principles of Epidemiology
3
Required Third Tier courses for this program
NURS 674 Population-Based Health Care Management
1
NURS 667 Blended Practicum I: The Family in a Community
1
NURS 676 Vulnerable Women/Families in Communities
3
NURS 668 Blended Prac II: Empowering Women in Families/Communities
1
NURS 672 Community/Public Health Practicum
2
NURS 678 Health Care Mngmt: Addressing Disparities
3
NURS 669 Blended Practicum III: Networks, Orgs, & Systems
2
NURS 735 Perinatal Health
1
NURS 782 Management of Health Problems I
3
NURS 783 Management of Health Problems II
3
NURS 780 Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Seminar/Practicum I
4

Combined B.S.N./M.S.N. Program Option for Registered Nurses

The combined B.S.N./M.S.N. program option is designed for registered nurses whose original preparation in nursing was received in accredited diploma or associate degree programs and who have identified the Master of Sciene in Nursing degree as their educational goal. An option is available to complete course requirements for both the B.S.N. and M.S.N. programs. The program of study incorporates courses that meet B.S.N. degree requirements and those that fulfill M.S.N. core and specialty concentration requirements. Contact the School of Nursing for more information.

Admission to B.S.N./M.S.N. Program

Admission requirements to the B.S.N./M.S.N. program option include the following: submission of high school transcript; submission of nursing school, college and university transcripts (3.0 grade point average) showing completion of 60 semester hours in non-nursing required coursework and 34 credits in nursing coursework (see Transfer Credit for RN students); current RN licensure without restrictions and eligibility for RN licensure in D.C.; two years experience since licensure; letters of recommendation from persons familiar with applicant's academic ability and professional performance; declaration of clinical specialty and professional role area in master's program; and acceptable score on Graduate Record Examination.

Program Option for B.S.N./M.S.N. Students

The combined B.S.N./M.S.N. Program option is designed for registered nurses whose original preparation in nursing was received in accredited diploma or associate degree programs and who have identified the Master of Science degree as their educational goal.

Admission to BSN/MSN Program Option

Admission requirements include the following: Submission of high school transcript; submission of nursing school, college, and university transcripts (3.0 grade point average) showing completion of 60 semester hours in non-nursing coursework and 34 credits in nursing coursework (see Transfer Credit for R.N. Students); current R.N. licensure valid in the United States; two years of experience since licensure; letters of recommendation from persons familiar with applicant's academic ability and professional performance; declaration of clinical specialty and professional role area in master's program.

To meet B.S.N. requirements

Course # Course Title
Credits
NURS 370 Community and Environmental Nursing
3
NURS 372 Community and Environmental Nursing Clinical Applications
2
NURS 391 Concepts for Professional Nursing
3
NURS 378 Evidence-based Care/Health Informatics
3
NURS 403 Introduction to Nursing Research
3
NURS 426 Adults in Health and Illness Clinical Leadership
3
NURS 460 Alternate Clinical Experience
4
Statistics (graduate-level course)
3-4
Liberal Arts Elective
3
Bioethics
3
Health Assessment
4
Total
34-35

Total number of credits required for B.S.N.: 120.

To complete basic M.S.N. requirements:

Course # Course Title
Credit
NURS 661 Theoretical Foundations of Advanced Practice Nursing
2
NURS 663 Health Care Policy, Organization
3
NURS 704 Research in Nursing
3
NURS 895 Capstone Research Project (or Thesis-6)
3(6)
Specific Courses Required for Advance Practice Role
19-26
Total
30-41
Total number of credits required for M.S.N. degree: 30-41.

Post-Master's School of Nursing Certificate Option

The Post-Master's School of Nursing Certificate Option allows Master's prepared nurses to complete additional coursework necessary to be eligible for advanced practice certification exams. The programs of study vary in length based on the background of the candidate and the requirements of the advanced practice field. A minimum of 12 credits is required. Recipients receive a certificate from the School of Nursing as opposed to the University and transcript information simply documents completion of specific courses. With the exception of the residency requirement, students in Post-Master's School of Nursing Certificate Option are bound by all the policies and regulations for students in the M.S.N. program, including those for admission, progression, graduation and clinical practice.

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

Aim

The purpose of the Doctor of Nursing Practice Program, D.N.P., is to prepare expert clinicians and nurse leaders.

Goal

Graduates are prepared to assume leadership positions in nursing/health care, with the ultimate goals of improving health care and the health status of people.

Terminal Objectives

Graduates will:

1. Analyze and apply scientific knowledge and skills to provide the highest level of advanced practice nursing.

2. Implement emerging science and practice innovations in health care.

3. Evaluate and initiate changes in response to social, political, economic, and ethical issues in health care and the discipline of nursing.

4. Collaborate with members of other disciplines in the design, implementation, and evaluation of programs and policies for the improvement of health care.

5. Assume leadership roles in nursing/health care.

School of Nursing Specific Admission Requirements

The Catholic University School of Nursing employs a "whole person" philosophy for evaluation of applicants for admission to the D.N.P. program.

Post-Master's D.N.P. Applicants

1. Earned baccalaureate and master's degrees in nursing with a GPA of 3.5 or higher, from degree programs accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

2. GRE scores within the last five years.

3. Submission of a professional portfolio that includes:

a. Statement of reason(s) for seeking the D.N.P. degree.
b. Curriculum vitae or résumé,
c. Copy of license (as an RN and advanced practice license, if applicable) from at least one state.
d. Certification in an advanced practice specialty.
e. Narrative description of current and past clinical practice.
f. Three letters of reference (at least one from a former dean or academic adviser and at least one from a former employer).
g. Publications (if applicable).

4. A 5-10 page proposal identifying an evidence-based practice project. This may be a practice improvement issue, a clinical management problems or area of clinical research that the applicant will address while in the program. The paper should cite appropriate sources and follow APA format. In addition, the applicant must be able to identify key resources (personnel, preceptors, institutions) necessary to complete the project.

5. A graduate level statistics course completed within 5 years prior to program matriculation.

6. Meets the School of Nursing's Health-Related Behavioral Standards for clinical programs.

Post-Baccalaureate Applicants

1. Earned Baccalaureate degree in nursing from a program or school, accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education.

2. Grade point average of 3.0 or higher for B.S.N. degree

3. GRE scores within the last five years.

4. Submission of a profession portfolio that includes:

a. Statement of reason for seeking the D.N.P. degree.
b. Curriculum vitae or résumé.
c. Copy of RN license from at least one state.
d. Narrative description of current and past clinical practice.
e. Three letters of reference (at least one from a former dean or academic adviser and one from current or former employer).

5. A 5-10 page proposal identifying an evidence-based practice project. This may be a practice improvement issue, a clinical management problems, or area of clinical research that the applicant will address while in the program. The paper should cite appropriate sources and follow APA format. In addition, the applicant must be able to identify key resources (personnel, preceptors, institutions) necessary to complete the project.

6. A graduate level statistics course completed within five years prior to program matriculation.

7. Meets the School of Nursing's Health-Related Behavioral Standards for clinical programs.

General Degree Requirements

A total of 34-37 credits (which may include up to 6 transfer credits for prior coursework in the area) is required for the post-master's D.N.P. degree. A post-baccalaureate D.N.P. entails 71-89 credits, depending on the clinical specialty chosen. Pre-requisites for the post-master's D.N.P. include graduate level courses in: Health Policy, Bioethics, Health Promotion, and statistics.

Coursework

A program of study is planned individually to meet the particular needs of each student, in accord with the student's field of study and career goals. Under the adviser's direction and with the approval of the dean, six semester hours of graduate work earned at another institution prior to initial enrollment at The Catholic University of America with a grade level of B or above may be applied toward degree requirements. Transfer of graduate work earned at another university will be considered only after the student has completed one full time semester (or its equivalent) of graduate work at The Catholic University of America in accordance with the transfer policy of the university. Graduate courses in nursing are not open to challenge.

Grading

A grade point average of 3.0 is required for retention. In general, a grade of C is passing but marginal at the graduate level. A grade of C in clinical courses is not acceptable; students who earn C grades may repeat clinical courses once.

Residence

Post-masters D.N.P. students must complete course requirements within five years from the date of initial enrollment. Continuous enrollment must be maintained unless a written leave of absence has been granted.

Candidacy for the Degree

To be considered for admission to candidacy for the D.N.P. degree, the student must satisfy these requirements:

1. Complete program requirements with a grade point average of 3.0.

2. Successfully write the comprehensive examination. This examination may be taken in the semester in which it is clear to the adviser and the student that the student will complete all coursework.

3. Satisfactorily complete an evidence-based practice project.

4. Satisfactorily complete a professional portfolio (which was begun upon admission).

5. Recommendation of the academic adviser.

Clinical Policies and Regulations

D.N.P students are bound by the same clinical policies and regulations required of M.S.N. students

Licensure requirements for post-M.S.N. students are the same as for B.S.N. with the exception that thee licensure is at the advanced practice nursing level.

Curriculum Plan: Post-Master's D.N.P. Program of StudyOption

The post-master's D.N.P. program consists of 33-36 credits. Coursework for the D.N.P. includes:

D.N.P. Courses:
Credits
NURS 916 Seminal in Nursing Scholarship
1
NURS 664 Epidemiology
3
NURS 674 Population-based Health Care Management
1
NURS 729 Emerging Issues in Health
3
NURS 686 Health Care Finance
3
NURS 732 Applied Epidemiology
1
NURS 730 Evidence-Based Practice I
3
NURS 731 Evidence-Based Practice II
3
NURS 737 Advanced Practice-based Residency
4
NURS 739 D.N.P. Project Guidance
3
NURS 734 Leadership in Complex Health Care
3
2-3 Advanced Clinical Cognate Courses
6-9
Total credits required:
34-37

Twenty-four credits may be transferred from the master's degree, if appropriate and approved.

Curriculum Plan: Post-Baccalaureate D.N.P. Program Option

Students entering at a post-baccalaureate level will complete the appropriate M.S.N. courses, with the exception of the capstone course. However, those who opt to receive an M.S.N. while enrolled in D.N.P. coursework must meet the requirements of the M.S.N. program, which includes completion of the Capstone course and passing the M.S.N. comprehensive examination.

Doctor of Philosophy Program

Aim

The purpose of the Doctor of Philosophy degree is to prepare expert clinicians as nurse scientists. Through the investigation of clinical problems, graduates contribute to the development, validation and refinement of theory and the advancement of the body of nursing knowledge.

Goal

Graduates are prepared to assume leadership positions in practice, education and research with the ultimate goal of improving health care.

Terminal Objectives

Graduates will:

1. Advance nursing knowledge through the integration, application and testing of theory;

2. Conduct research and develop evidence-based practice that supports the ongoing development of nursing science;

3. Assess the impact of social, political and ethical issues on health care and the discipline of nursing;

4. Collaborate with members of other disciplines in the design, implementation and evaluation of programs and policies for the improvement of health care; and

5. Assume leadership roles in nursing and health care.

School of Nursing Specific Admission Requirements

The Catholic University School of Nursing employs a "whole person" philosophy for evaluation of applicants for admission to the Doctor of Philosophy in nursing program. The applicant's potential for success is evaluated in a variety of ways including:

1. Possess a baccalaureate degree and a master's degree in nursing from an accredited college or university offering a program in nursing accredited by the National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission or the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education. (Exceptions may be made on a case-by-case basis for B.S.N. prepared applicants with a non-nursing master's degree; exceptions may also be made international students or those educated in other countries).

2. Graduates of programs not accredited by the NLNAC or CCNE must have transcripts evaluated and comparability to an American degrees established. Evaluation may be conducted by the World Education Services (www.wes.org).

3. Submission of an official report of scores, no more than five years old, on the Graduate Record Examination.

4. Presentation of transcripts of undergraduate and graduate study that provide evidence of academic ability to complete the program and do original research. A GPA of 3.5 or higher is desired.

5. Three letters of reference (at least one from a former dean, former faculty member or academic adviser and at least one from a current or former supervisor preferably in a clinical practice/research/academic setting).

6. A written statement of career goals and proposed area of research.

7. A copy of a recent scholarly paper, research report or publication related to clinical nursing.

In addition, if the applicant is an international student the following are also required:

1. Satisfactory completion of the TOEFL examination with a minimum score of 580 (paper based test) or 237 (computer-based test).

2. Evaluation of transcripts must be completed by the Commission on Graduates of Foreign Nursing Schools.

3. International students may be required to take intensive English courses and/or other additional courses as recommended by the academic adviser or dean.

4. Official documentation of funding for one year of study, including tuition and living expenses must be submitted.

See School of Nursing Web site http://nursing.cua.edu for additional admissions information.

Coursework

Seventy semester hours beyond baccalaureate study are required for the Ph.D. degree. Students must earn a minimum of 46 semester hours in coursework during doctoral study at The Catholic University of America. Under the adviser's direction, a maximum of 24 semester hours of master's level coursework completed with a grade of B or higher may be applied toward the required 70 semester hours. Full- and part-time study is available.

General Policies for the Ph.D. Program

1. Coursework must be completed in five years.

2. A graduate-level statistics course that has been successfully completed in the last five years is a pre- or co-requisite to the first semester of study.

3. A grade point average of 3.0 is required for retention.

4. Although a grade of C is passing but marginal at the graduate level, a grade of C in clinically focused research courses/role practica is not acceptable. Courses may only be repeated once.

Residence

The minimum period of residence for the degree is three years. Work completed for the master's degree at The Catholic University of America or its equivalent at another university of approved standing may be accepted as fulfilling one year of the minimum period of residence. The equivalent of four semesters of full-time graduate coursework toward the degree must be done in residence at this university.

Candidacy for the Degree

To be considered for admission to candidacy for the doctoral degree, the student must have satisfied these requirements:

1. Satisfactory completion of course requirements with a minimum grade point average of 3.0.

2. Recommendation of the academic adviser.

3. Successful comprehensive examination.

4. Completion and school and university level approval of a formal application for candidacy.

Dissertation

After admission to candidacy, completion of a satisfactory dissertation involving significant and original research in nursing is required. University policies regarding the approval of the dissertation topic, structure and content of the dissertation and the oral examination must be followed.

Oral Proposal Defense. The SON requires that prior to submitting the Dissertation Proposal for University level review and approval of the dissertation topic, student undergo a School of Nursing specific defense of the proposal and the supportive work. The defense is conducted by a School of Nursing approved examination committee. Students are bound by the decision of the committee as to whether the student's proposal work may be recommended for approval, revision or disapproval. Students are referred to the School of Nursing Student Guidelines for additional information.

M.S.N.-Ph.D. Option

An option is available to meet the needs of baccalaureate-prepared nurses whose goal is to achieve the doctorate. Applicants must meet all admission requirements for the M.S.N. program and the Ph.D. program with the exception of a prior M.S.N. degree. Programs of study are planned on an individual basis. Students may take the M.S.N. and Ph.D. components sequentially to receive the M.S.N. degree prior to the Ph.D. or concurrently to receive both degrees at the same time.

If a student chooses to receive the M.S.N. degree prior to the Ph.D., comprehensive examination for the M.S.N. degree must be taken at the end of M.S.N. coursework and Ph.D. comprehensive exams at the end of the Ph.D. coursework. If the student chooses to receive both degrees concurrently, the student is only required to take the Ph.D. level comprehensive exams.

Program of Study

The Ph.D. program of study consists of 70 hours, 24 of which may be transferred from master's level work. The remaining credits are distributed among nursing science, philosophy, research and support courses. A graduate-level statistics course is a pre- or corequisite to the first semester of study. The proposed curriculum plan is accessible through the School of Nursing website.

Core Courses
12 credits
PHIL 601 Philosophy of Science
3
NURS 907 Theory Development
3
THEO 625 Bioethics
3
NURS 926 Health Policy
3
Research Courses
22 credits
NURS 900 Research Overview
1
EDUC 733 Advanced Statistics I: Experimental Design
3
EDUC 737 Advanced Statistics II: Applied Regression Analysis
3
NURS 908 Qualitative Research in Nursing
3
NURS 909 Quantitative Research in Nursing
3
NURS 923 Clinical Problems I: Theoretical Considerations
3
NURS 924 Clinical Problems II: Design Considerations
3
NURS 930 Seminar on Research Proposals
3
Support Courses-Courses supporting the dissertation topic (six to nine credits) and professional goals (three to six credits)
12
Total
70

Twenty-four credits may be transferred from the master's degree if appropriate and approved.

Graduate Level Courses Offered Through the M.S.N., D.N.P. and Ph.D. Programs

Since the course offered may be updated during the academic year, for the most up to date information, students should always view the online course catalog, available through Cardinal Station via https://cardinalstation.cua.edu. Please also consult the website for course descriptions.

All courses listed below are three credit unless otherwise noted. Course descriptions are available on the Web at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu.

The number of hours of meeting/contact time per week is determined by the type of nursing course and credits. The following ratios are used:

Didactic Course 1 credit=1 hour/week
Clinical/Lab Course 1 credit= 6 hours/week
NURS Course Title
561 Aging: Holistic Perspectives on Health
570 Substance Abuse and Health
575 Human Lactation and Breastfeeding
608 Psychopharmacology
610 Pharmocology for Advanced Nursing Practice
627 Health Policy Practicum
657 Advanced Health Assessment
661 Theoretical Foundations for Advanced Practice
663 Health Care Policy, Organizations & Finance
664 Principles of Epidemiology
667 Blended Practicum I: The Family in a Community
668 Blended Prac II: Empowering Women in Families/Communities
669 Blended Practicum III: Networks, Orgs, & Systems
672 Community/Public Health Practicum
674 Population-Based Health Care Management
675 Population-Based Health Care Practicum
676 Vulnerable Women/Families in Communities
677 Vulnerable Women/Families in Communities Practicum
678 Health Care Mngmt: Addressing Disparities
679 Health Care Mngmt: Addressing Disparities Prac
683 Educator: Comm/Public Health Practicum
684 Global, Immigrant & Refugee Health
685 Global, Immigrant & Refugee Women and Families Practicum
686 Health Care Finance
687 Managing Health Information
698 Pathophysiology
701 Health Promotion
708 Research in Nursing: Methods & Outcomes
729 Emerging Issues in Health
730 Evidence-Based Practice I
731 Evidence-Based Practice II
732 Applied Epidemiology
734 Leadership in Complex Health Care
735 Perinatal Health
737 Advanced Practice-Based Residency
739 Doctor of Nursing Practice Project Guidance
741 Bio-Behavioral Psychiatric Nursing
742 Mental Health of the Individual
743 Mental Health of the Family
746 Practicum in Community Mental Health I
747 Practicum in Community Mental Health II
756 Mental Health of the Group
766 Family and Culture
779 Child and Adolescents with Special Needs
780 Ped Nurse Practitioner Seminar/Practicum I
781 Ped Nurse Practitioner Seminar/Practicum II
781A Ped Nurse Practicum II
782 Management of Health Problems I
783 Management of Health Problems II
784 Nurse Practitioner Practicum I
785 Nurse Practitioner Practicum II
786 Nurse Practitioner Practicum III
787 Primary Care of the Newborn
789 Advanced Practice Role Seminar
797 Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum I
798 Clinical Nurse Specialist Practicum II
835 Program Development and Evaluation
836 Education Seminar and Practicum
895 Capstone Research Project
907 Theory Development
908 Qualitative Research in Nursing
909 Quantitative Research in Nursing
916 Seminar in Nursing Scholarship
922 Research Practicum & Seminar
923 Clinical Problems I: Theoretical Considerations
924 Clinical Problems II: Design Considerations
926 Health Policy Formulation and Analysis
930 Seminar on Research Proposals
995 Master's Thesis Guidance
996 Dissertation Guidance
997 Dissertation Guidance
998 Dissertation Guidance