The Catholic University of America

School of Nursing

Officers of Instruction

Faculty

Nalini N.Jairath, Ph.D., RN
Dean
Patricia McMullen, Ph.D., JD, CNS,CRNP
Associate Dean for Academic Affairs and Graduate Programs
Mary A.Paterson, Ph.D., RN
Associate Professor and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Programs
Janice Griffin Agazio, Ph.D., CPNP
Assistant Professor
Kathleen Buckley, Ph.D., RN
Associate Professor
Sister Rosemary Donley, Ph.D., CRNP, ANP, FAAN
Professor
Sharon Dudley-Brown, Ph.D., APRN- BC, FNP
Associate Professor
Joanne Duffy, Ph.D., RN
Associate Professor
Janalyn Edmonds, Ph.D., RN.
Clinical Assistant Professor and Director Simulation/Skills Laboratory
Sister Mary Jean Flaherty, S.C., Ph.D., RN, FAAN.
Professor
Marjorie Graziano, M.S.N., FNP.
Clinical Assistant Professor
Cynthia Knoll Grandjean, Ph.D., MGA, CRNP, ANP/GNP
Assistant Professor
Elizabeth Hawkins-Walsh, Ph.D., RN, CPNP
Clinical Assistant Professor
Lois M. Hoskins, Ph.D., RN, FAAN
Professor Emerita
Laurie Lemieux, M.S., RN, WHNP
Clinical Instructor
Barbara Moran,Ph.D., CNM, FACCE
Assistant Professor
Janet Merritt, Ph.D., RN
Assistant Professor
Sister Mary Elizabeth O'Brien, Ph.D., RN, FAAN
Professor
Sister Maria Salerno, O.S.F., Ph.D., APRN-BC, APN/GNP.
Associate Professor
Jean E. Toth
Associate Professor

Associates of the Faculty

Anna Alt-White,Ph.D., RN
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Denise V. Baugh,Pharm.D., M.B.A
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Donna Knauth,Ph.D., RNC
Research Assistant Professor
Mary Anne Hilliard, J.D., RN
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Joyce E. Johnson, D.N.Sc., RN, FAAN
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Frederick A. Lombardo, Pharm.D., M.S., RPh, BCPS, BCNSP, BCOP.
Adjunct Professor
Frank Pucino Jr., Pharm.D., BCPS
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Carmen Ramirez, Ph.D., RN
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Eileen Sarsfield, M.S.N., APRN-BC
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Rita F. Seifert, Ph.D
Adjunct Assistant Professor
Col. Janet R. Southby, D.N.Sc., RN, ANC
(ret.)Adjunct Assistant Professor
Carole S. Stone, M.S.N., CPNP
Adjunct Assistant Professor

History


The School of Nursing traces its beginning to the summer of 1932 when The Catholic University of America for the first time offered a group of professional courses in nursing education. Because of the demand, the work was continued during the following academic year and in April 1933 the Board of Trustees authorized a curriculum leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education. The first degree was conferred in 1934. The Division of Nursing Education, which offered this program, was approved for active membership in the Association of Collegiate Schools of Nursing in June 1935. The Division of Public Health Nursing, offering a curriculum leading to the baccalaureate degree, was initiated in September 1935. In November 1935, the Board of Trustees accepted the recommendation of Bishop James Hugh Ryan that the two divisions be organized as one of the professional schools of the university. The programs of study leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Nursing Education and Bachelor of Science in Public Health Nursing were approved. The school was subsequently expanded to include basic professional nursing in addition to the program for registered nurses. In 1939 the Providence Hospital School of Nursing, Washington, D.C., became the Providence Division of the School of Nursing Education and during the next decade gradually moved toward complete identification with the university. In 1949 the university assumed full responsibility for the undergraduate program.

In 1951 the degree of Master of Science in Nursing was introduced. The current program prepares nurses for advanced practice roles in a clinical specialty, with students prepared as nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists and educators. A program leading to the degree Doctor of Nursing Science was initiated in 1968.

It was one of the first of its kind in the country and graduates hold major leadership positions in education, health care administration and research. In the spring of 2006, the D.N.Sc. program was converted to a Ph.D. granting program. The focus of the doctoral program remains on clinical investigation and development of expert clinicians who can assume leadership positions in many different areas.

Most recently, in 2007 the school added a Doctor of Nursing Practice, DNP, program that prepares expert clinicians and nursing leaders.

The school is recognized for its program offerings, the quality of faculty and commitment to diversity and improving the care of vulnerable populations. Graduates remain the school's greatest strength because of leadership, knowledge, clinical expertise, and commitment to continuous learning and improvement.

All academic programs are fully accredited and approved by appropriate external review bodies.

Mission

Strengthened by a rich heritage of Catholic teachings and Christian values, the mission of the School of Nursing is (a) to prepare professionally educated nurses who are capable of the moral, intellectual, and professional leadership needed to provide continuing quality in clinical nursing care, in nursing education, in nursing research, and in nursing service; and, (b) to advance nursing knowledge and skill through scientific inquiry and other scholarly activity.

Goals

The four specific educational goals of the School of Nursing, as identified by the faculty, are:

1. Educational programs are implemented to meet the mission of the School of Nursing and the university, the standards set by the profession and societal needs.

2. The climate and environment in the School of Nursing facilitates faculty and student research and scholarly activities.

3. A competitive market position is maintained to enroll a sufficient number of qualified students of diverse backgrounds to support the excellence of the educational programs.

4. Contributions to the health care of people are made through an emphasis on Christian, moral, and spiritual value systems within the context of Catholic teachings.

Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program

Aim

The aim of the baccalaureate program is to prepare students for beginning professional nursing practice. The program provides the general and professional education essential for understanding human beings, their culture, and their environment; for acquiring and utilizing nursing theory upon which nursing practice is based; and for promoting self-understanding, personal fulfillment, and motivation for continued learning. The student in the program is prepared to maintain and promote client adaptation in a variety of health care settings, through theory and utilization of the nursing process.

Program of Study

The basic program, or curriculum plan, offered at the undergraduate level leads to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing, B.S.N. This program is designed for the beginning nursing student; high school graduates or students with some college transfer credit enter this basic program. This program of study may also be modified to meet the needs of other applicants seeking the B.S.N. but having different entrance qualifications. College graduates with non-nursing degrees or students with more than 55 college credits may apply to the second degree program. Registered nurse graduates from associate degree or diploma programs may choose the B.S.N. completion plan or the combined B.S.N. plan.

The School of Nursing Web site (www.nursing.cua.edu) contains the newest and most complete information on plans of study and nursing coursework.

Terminal Objectives

The graduate of the baccalaureate program in nursing will:

  1. Demonstrate moral integrity in caring for all persons.
  2. Synthesize foundational and theoretical knowledge from religion, philosophy, the humanities, and the natural and behavioral sciences in their practice of nursing
  3. Integrate the principles of primary health care in the delivery of compassionate, technically competent, holistic nursing care.
  4. Demonstrate knowledge of the context in which professional nurses practice, including the biobehavioral, cultural, political, environmental, economic, ethical, legal, scientific, and spiritual dimensions.
  5. Demonstrate effective skills in communicating and collaborating with clients, health care providers, and members of the community.
  6. Demonstrate use of critical thinking skills in making informed judgments in the management of health for individuals, families, groups, and communities.
  7. Apply leadership principles in practice settings, to influence and educate others in providing health care.
  8. Reflect a commitment to self-development and the advancement of the profession of nursing through participation in educational, community, and organizational activities.
  9. Use the nursing process to promote and restore health, and prevent illness in individuals, families, groups and communities, including vulnerable populations.
  10. Evaluate research findings for application to professional nursing practice.

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing Degree

Full-time and part-time study is available. All nursing students will be assigned a faculty adviser with whom the student must consult at least once a semester.

The program consists of 120 semester hours (120 hours in the B.S.N. Completion Program) in the following distribution. The program requirements may be modified for transfer and second-degree students, and RN students in the B.S.N. Completion Program.

Natural Science and Math- 22 semester hours

Chemistry (inorganic and organic
chemistry content)
4 semester hours
Human anatomy and physiology 8 semester hours
Microbiology 3 semester hours
Statistics 3 semester hours

English-3 semester hours

All students are required to take one English writing course. The particular course depends on the criteria for placement at the time of matriculation. Transfer credit will be evaluated on an individual basis. All students for whom English is a second language must complete the English placement examination offered at the university,

Philosophy-6 semester hours

May be modified for transfer and second-degree students.

Religion-9 semester hours

Of the three required religion courses, one must be a biomedical ethics course. Religion requirements may be modified for transfer and second-degree students.

Humanities/Liberal Studies-9-15 semester hours

Psychology 3 semester hours
Electives 12 semester hours (6 credits of electives must be in humanities/liberal arts; 6 are free electives.

Nursing-69 semester hours (65 semester hours in the B.S.N. Completion Program)

Introduction to Professional Nursing 2
Foundations of Nursing Practice 3
Health Assessment 4
Communication for Health Care Professionals 3
Nutrition and Health 2
Pathophysiology/Pharmacology 7
Community and Environmental Nursing Lecture and Clinical Applications 5
Nursing Applications 3
Growth and Development Concepts for Nurses 3
Mental Health Nursing Lecture and Clinical Applications 5
Evidence Based Care/Health Informatics 3
Introduction to Nursing Research 3
Children in Health and Illness Lecture and Clinical Applications 5
Women in Health and Illness Lecture and Clinical Applications 5
Management of Health Care Delivery 3
Transition to Professional Practice 3
Adults in Health and Illness: Clinical Applications  
Basic Clinical Applications 2
Intermediate Clinical Applications 2
Advanced Clinical Applications 3
Clinical leadership 3

Credit/Clock Hour Ratio

The number of hours per week a class will meet is determined by the type of course and credits. The following ratios are used:

Theory course
1 credit = 1 hour/week
Seminar course
1 credit = 2 hours/week
Clinical/Lab course
1 credit = 3 hours/week

Typical Program Plans

Basic Program

This plan may be modified to meet an individual student's program. The faculty reserves the right to revise the curriculum. The total number of semesters hours required for graduation is 120.

Freshman Year
Course # Course Title 1st 2nd
NURS 150 Introduction to Professional Nursing 2 -
BIOL 232/233 Anatomy/Physiology 4 4
CHEM 110/111 Organic and Biochemistry for Allied Health[1] or Chemistry 101 (3cr)[2] 4 -
BIOL 223 Microbiology - 3
PHIL 201/202 Classical Mind, Modern Mind 3 3
PSY 201 General Psychology 3 -
ENG 101 or ENG 111 Rhetoric and Composition or Composition and Literature - 3
SOC 301 or Math 114 Statistics for the Social Sciences or Probability and Statistics - 3
  Total 16 16
Sophomore Year
Course # Course Title 1st 2nd
NURS 310/371 Pathophysiology/Pharmacology 4 3
NURS 370 Community and Environmental Nursing Lecture 2 -
NURS 372 Community and Environmental Nursing Clinical Applications - 3
NURS 240 Foundations of Nursing Practice 3 -
NURS 254 Communication for Health Care Professionals44 - 3[3]
NURS 258 Health Assessment44 4 -
NURS 257 Nutrition and Health44 2 -
NURS 272 Nursing Applications - 3
TRS 200-261[4] Introductory Level Religion Course 1 3
  Total 18 15

 

Junior Year
Course # Course Title 1st 2nd
NURS 275 Adults in Health and Illness: Basic Clinical Applications 2 -
NURS 376 Adults in Health and Illness: Intermediate Clinical Applications - 2
NURS 375 Mental Health Nursing Lecture 3 -
NURS 377 Mental Health Nursing Clinical Applications 2 -
TRS 333 or PHIL 303 Biomedical and Health Care Issues or Biomedical Ethics - 3
NURS 378 Evidence-based Care/Health Informatics 3 -
NURS 380 Growth and Development Concepts for Nursing - 3
NURS 403 Introduction to Nursing Research - 3
Elective Humanities or Liberal Studies 3 3
  Total 13 14
Senior Year
Course # Course Title 1st 2nd
NURS 420 Child and Adolescent Health and Illness Lecture - 3
NURS 421 Child and Adolescent Health and Illness Clinical Applications - 2
NURS 423 Women in Health and Illness Lecture 3 -
NURS 428 Women in Health and Illness Clinical Applications 2 -
NURS 424 Management of Health Care Delivery 3 -
NURS 427 Transition to Professional Nursing Practice - 3
NURS 479 Adults in Health and Illness Advanced Clinical Applications 3 -
NURS 426 Adults in Health and Illness Clinical Leadership - 3
  Free Electives 3 3
  Total 14 14

Admission to Basic Program

In addition to the university requirements, high school courses in biology and chemistry are required. Submission of SAT or ACT scores is also required. Students with earned credits from other accredited colleges or universities are eligible for transfer.

Transfer Students

Admission requirements for transfer students into the basic program include a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 and evaluation of goal statement, references, and extracurricular activities. Interviews are encouraged and may be requested by the Admissions Committee. A program plan will be determined after an evaluation of coursework from other postsecondary institutions has been completed. The school has policies for the acceptance of transfer students and validation of courses taken elsewhere. Course syllabi may be requested. Students applying for transfer from other schools within the university will be considered according to the above guidelines. Applicants should be aware that the length of their program of study may not be shortened if they are missing essential freshman level coursework.

International Students

Baccalaureate nursing programs are intensive academic programs with a heavy practice component. They require proficiency in written and spoken English and familiarity with the educational system in the United States, particularly with teaching and testing methods, to be successful. In addition, a broad background in liberal studies and the humanities is necessary to develop the critical thinking and problem-solving skills required to function as a professional nurse in the health care system in the United States.

Admission into the School of Nursing, subsequent course load, and length of program will be determined based on a review of the transcript evaluation, TOEFL score, and English placement examination. Enrollment in intensive English courses may be necessary to progress in the nursing program.

Requesting the transcript evaluation from an approved educational evaluation service is the responsibility of the student and must be submitted directly to the Office of Admissions by the service. It must include an English translation and a course-by-course evaluation, as well as credential evaluation.

All students for whom English is a second language must complete the English placement examination offered by the university regardless of the completion of English courses at other institutions. Recommendations based on the English placement examination must be satisfied for progression into the nursing program.

Second Degree Program for Non-Nursing College Graduates


The accelerated program is a three- to six-semester program that leads to a B.S.N. degree for students who have earned a baccalaureate or higher degree in the liberal arts or sciences. This program recognizes that college graduates, often older and prepared in other disciplines, have the maturity, ability, and desire to complete degree requirements in an intensive accelerated program. Opportunities to enroll in graduate courses are available for qualified students. Because this accelerated program is dependent upon a specific time sequence, unsuccessful performance in any nursing course (a grade of "W" or less than "C") will typically extend the length of time needed to complete the program.

First Year

Course # Course Title 1st 2nd
NURS 240 Foundations of Nursing Practice 3 -
NURS 258 Health Assessment 4 -
NURS 370 Community and Environmental Nursing Lecture 3 -
NURS 372 Community and Environmental Nursing Clinical Applications - 2
NURS 310/371 Pathophysiology/Pharmacology 4 3
TRS 333 Biomedical and Health Care Issues or Religion or Philosophy for transfer students - 3
NURS 272 Nursing Applications - 3
NURS 275 Adults in Health and Illness: Basic Clinical Applications 2 -
NURS 378 Evidence-based Care/Health Informatics - 3
  Total 16 14

Summer Session

Course # Course Title Semester Hours
NURS 375 Mental Health Nursing Lecture 3
NURS 377 Mental Health Nursing Clinical Applications 2
  Total 5

Second Year

Course # Course Title 1st 2nd
NURS 420 Child and Adolescent Health and Illness Lecture - 3
NURS 421 Child and Adolescent Health and Illness Clinical Applications - 2
NURS 423 Women in Health and Illness Lecture 3 -
NURS 428 Women in Health and Illness Clinical Applications 2 -
NURS 424 Management of Health Care Delivery 3 -
NURS 403 Introduction to Nursing Research - 3
NURS 427 Transition to Professional Nursing Practice - 3
NURS 479 Adults in Health and Illness Advanced Clinical Applications 3 -
NURS 426 Adults in Health and Illness Clinical Leadership - 3
  Free Electives 3 3
  Total 14 17

Admission to Accelerated Program

Admission requirements include a baccalaureate or higher degree earned within the past 10 years, with a cumulative grade point average of 3.0, and a transcript, which reflects courses in human anatomy and physiology, microbiology, chemistry (with organic chemistry content), statistics, nutrition, and humanities. A grade point average of 3.0 is required for anatomy and physiology, microbiology, and chemistry.

Acceptance into the program is not based solely on GPA and number of transfer credits, but also on evaluation of goal statement and references. Interviews are encouraged and may be requested by the Admissions Committee.

B.S.N. Completion Program for Registered Nurses

The B.S.N. Completion Program provides the opportunity for registered nurses to continue the education they began in associate degree or diploma nursing programs. A.A.S. graduates receive 32 credits for nursing courses already completed. Diploma graduates also receive 32 credits for nursing courses completed after successfully completing the challenge examination process. Students must complete a total of 120 college credits including basic sciences (anatomy, physiology, organic chemistry/biochemistry, and microbiology). Also provided are individualized clinical learning opportunities that take into account students' pre-college experiences.

Admission to B.S.N. Completion Program

Admission requirements include submission of a high school transcript; submission of nursing program transcript; completion of all required transfer credit; a cumulative grade point average of 2.5; a current R.N. license valid in the United States; and two letters of recommendation from persons familiar with the applicant's academic ability and professional performance. Nurses not currently registered in the United States are not eligible for admission into the B.S.N. Completion Program. They may be admitted into the basic program as a transfer student. The total number of semester hours required for graduation is 120.

Required for B.S.N. Completion Program

Course # Course Title Semester Hours
NURS 701 Health Promotion 3
NURS 370 Community and Environmental Nursing Lecture 3
NURS 372 Community and Environmental Nursing Clinical Applications 2
NURS 391 Concepts for Professional Nursing 3
NURS 378 Evidence-based Care/Health Informatics 3
NURS 403 Introduction to Nursing Research 3
NURS 424 Management of Health Care Delivery 3
NURS 479 Adults in Health and Illness Advanced Clinical Applications 3
NURS 426 Adults in Health and Illness Clinical Leadership 3
PHIL 505 Moral Issues in Health Care 3
NURS 657 Advanced Health Assessment 3
  Total 32

Combined B.S.N./M.S.N Program for Registered Nurses

The combined B.S.N./M.S.N. Program is designed for registered nurses whose original preparation in nursing was received in accredited diploma or associate degree programs and who have identified the Master of Science degree as their educational goal.

Admission requirements include the following: Submission of high school transcript; submission of nursing school, college, and university transcripts (3.0 grade point average) showing completion of 60 semester hours in non-nursing coursework and 34 credits in nursing coursework (see Transfer Credit for R.N. Students); current R.N. licensure valid in the United States; two years of experience since licensure; letters of recommendation from persons familiar with applicant's academic ability and professional performance; declaration of clinical specialty and professional role area in master's program.

Program for B.S.N./M.S.N. Students

To meet B.S.N. requirements

Course # Course Title Semester Hours
NURS 370 Community and Environmental Nursing 3
NURS 372 Community and Environmental Nursing Clinical Applications 2
NURS 391 Concepts for Professional Nursing 3
NURS 378 Evidence-based Care/Health Informatics 3
NURS 403 Introduction to Nursing Research 3
NURS 426 Adults in Health and Illness Clinical Leadership 3
NURS 460 Alternate Clinical Experience 4
  Statistics (graduate-level course) 3-4
  Liberal Arts Elective 3
  Bioethics 3
  Health Assessment 4
  Total 34-35

Total number of semester hours required for B.S.N.: 120.

To complete M.S.N. requirements:

Course # Course Title Semester Hours
NURS 661 Theoretical Foundations of Advanced Practice Nursing 2
NURS 663 Health Care Policy, Organization 3
NURS 704 Research in Nursing 3
NURS 895 Capstone Research Project (or Thesis-6) 3(6)
  Specific Courses Required for Advance Practice Role 19-26
  Total 30-41
Total number of semester hours required for M.S.N. degree: 30-41.

Student Resources

Students fulfill their clinical requirements at a wide variety of acute care, long term, and community agencies throughout the Washington area.

Policies and Regulations


Grading and Progression Policies

  1. A student in the School of Nursing must maintain a minimum cumulative grade point average, GPA, of 2.0 in order to be in good academic standing.
  2. A 2.0 cumulative GPA is required in the following basic natural science courses before entering upper-division (300-level) nursing courses: chemistry, anatomy and physiology, and microbiology.
  3. A minimum grade of C is required in all nursing courses.
  4. A student may repeat only one nursing performance course in which a D or F was earned and must pass it. A satisfactory performance evaluation is necessary to pass performance courses.
  5. Required science courses and courses in the nursing major may be repeated only once, including withdrawal and audit.
  6. A student may repeat a total of two nursing courses, including required science courses, in which a D or F was earned and must pass them.
  7. Students must pass required pre- or co-requisites to progress to the next level (i.e., 200- 300- 400- level courses).
  8. A student in the accelerated program must be successful in the first attempt of all nursing courses in order to meet the specified time sequence.

Essential Criteria for Progression in the Baccalaureate Nursing Program

Baccalaureate nursing students are expected to demonstrate beginning level cognitive and psychomotor skills in early courses and increasing competence as they progress through the program. The clinical evaluation tool spells out these performance expectations. Students must attain a grade of C or better in all nursing courses.

Policies Concerning Probation and Dismissal from the School of Nursing

A 2.0 minimum GPA must be achieved each academic semester and a 2.0 cumulative GPA must be maintained. Any student who fails to achieve at least a 2.0 GPA at the end of any academic semester or whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 will be placed on academic probation. A student on academic probation is allowed to register for no more than 14 hours per semester and may not progress in nursing performance courses. Participation in any extracurricular activities, such as student government or intercollegiate athletics, will be reviewed and may be restricted.

A student on probation may only register for theory courses and a performance course being repeated.

A student on probation may not graduate from the School of Nursing until she/he has achieved a 2.0 cumulative GPA.

Students placed on probation are required to attend study skills and test-taking skills workshops prior to being removed from probation.

The following are the grounds for academic dismissal from the School of Nursing:

  1. Failure to gain a 2.0 cumulative GPA after two consecutive semesters on probationary status.
  2. Failure in three courses in any given semester.
  3. A cumulative GPA of less than 1.5 at the end of any academic year.
  4. Unsuccessful completion (D or F) of a nursing or required science course being repeated
  5. Unsuccessful completion (D or F) in three nursing or required science courses throughout the course of study.
  6. Unsuccessful completion (D or F) in two nursing performance courses.

The School of Nursing maintains the Committee on Admissions, Progression, and Retention to monitor student progress and to make decisions concerning probation, academic dismissal, and subsequent appeals.

A student may request readmission or relief from the restrictions imposed by probation by appealing in writing to the Committee on Admissions, Progression, and Retention c/o Associate Dean, Undergraduate Programs. Students dismissed from the School of Nursing may be considered for retention at the university if they satisfy minimum university requirements. Students dismissed from the School of Nursing who meet such requirements must transfer to another school or program.

Student Responsibility

Attendance. The faculty and administration in the School of Nursing consider attendance in class necessary to master the body of knowledge needed for safe clinical practice and adequate preparation for licensure. Therefore, class and clinical/lab attendance is mandatory. The responsibility for prompt and regular class and clinical/lab attendance rests upon the individual student. Professors are responsible for establishing and communicating policy regarding documentation and consequences of absenteeism in their individual classes. This may include requiring authentication of unavoidable absences and the inability for a student to receive a passing grade.

Transportation to Agencies. The student is expected to assume responsibility for transportation in connection with the clinical practice, community health practice and field trips. Public transportation is often available at these sites.

Insurance. All sophomore, junior and senior students are required to carry malpractice insurance. It is available through the university. This insurance applies only for clinical practice while enrolled in university courses. It does not cover students involved in personal employment. See Fees and Expenses in the General Information section of these Announcements.

Health Clearance. The student is required to meet School of Nursing health requirements prior to admission and prior to entering clinical coursework.

Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation, CPR. The student is required to meet basic CPR requirements prior to entering clinical coursework.

Drug/Alcohol Screen. A negative drug and alcohol screen may be required.

Security/Background Checks. Beginning with the sophomore year, background checks are required prior to entering clinical coursework.

Courses of Instruction

All courses listed below are three credit unless otherwise noted. Course descriptions are available on the Web at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu.

Many courses are open to non-nursing students. Students from other schools should check with the School of Nursing before registering for nursing courses, except for NURS 150.

NURS Title
150 Introduction to Professional Nursing (2)
240 Foundations of Nursing Practice
254 Communication for Health Care Professionals
257 Nutrition and Health (2)
258 Health Assessment (4)
272 Nursing Applications
275 Adults in Health and Illness Basic Clinical Applications (2)
310 Pathophysiology/Pharmacology (4)
370 Community & Environmental Nursing Lecture
372 Community & Environmental Nursing Clinical Applications (2)
371 Pathophysiology/Pharmacology
375 Mental Health Nursing Lecture
377 Mental Health Nursing Clinical Applications (2)
376 Adults in Health and Illness Intermediate Clinical Applications (2)
378 Evidence-based Care/Health Informatics
380 Growth and Development Concepts for Nursing
391 Concepts for Professional Nursing
401 Directed Study for Professional Practice (0)
403 Introduction to Nursing Research
420 Child and Adolescent Health and Illness Lecture
421 Child and Adolescent Health and Illness Clinical Applications (2)
423 Women in Health and Illness Lecture
428 Women in Health and Illness Clinical Applications (2)
424 Management of Health Care Delivery
426 Adults in Health and Illness Clinical Leadership
427 Transition to Professional Practice
448 Guided Study in Nursing (1)
450 Guided Study in Nursing (2)
452 Guided Study in Nursing
454 Guided Study in Nursing
460 Alternate Clinical Experience for RN Students (ACE) (4)
466 Intro to Nursing Management
479 Adults in Health and Illness Advanced Clinical Applications
561 Aging: Holistic Perspectives on Health
567 Relationship Centered Caring
569 Spirituality and Care of the Sick
570 Substance Abuse and Health

 

 



[1] May be taken either semester depending on chemistry placement.

[2] Requires chemistry placement test; depending on placement Chemistry 101-3 credits may be pre-requisite.

[3] May be taken either semester.

[4] At least one of the 200-level TRS courses must be numbered 200-261; students of non-Christian background may take TRS 291 to fulfill this requirement.