The Catholic University of America

School of Architecture and Planning

Officers of Instruction

Faculty

Randall Ott, M.Arch., AIA Dean, Professor
Ann Cederna, M.Arch.,AIA Associate Dean, Associate Professor
George J. Martin, M.Arch. Assistant Dean, Assistant Professor
Eric J. Jenkins, M.Arch., M.Des.S., AIA Assistant Dean, Assistant Professor
Raj Barr-Kumar, Ph.D. Associate Professor
Carlos Roberto Barrios, Ph.D. Associate Professor
Luis Eduardo Boza, M.Arch. Associate Professor
Hazel R. Edwards, Ph.D. Associate Professor
Mohamed Elnahas, Ph.D. Associate Professor
Lavinia Fici Pasquina,M.Arch., RA (Italy) Associate Professor
Christopher P. Grech, B.Arch. Associate Professor
Vytenis Gureckas, M.S.B.D., RA Associate Professor
Miriam Gusevich, M.Arch. Associate Professor
Stanley I. Hallet, M.Arch., FAIA Professor
William A. Jelen, M.Arch., AIA Visiting Assistant Professor
J. Ronald Kabriel, M.Arch. Assistant Professor
Julius S. Levine, B.S.CE., M.CP., FAICP Professor
George T. Marcou, M.Arch., AICP Professor Emeritus
Andreea Mihalache, Ph.D. Visiting Assistant Professor
Adnan Morshed, Ph.D. Assistant Professor
Theodore Naos, M.Arch. Professor
Walter D. Ramberg, B.Arch., AIA Professor Emeritus
Terrance Williams, M.Arch., FAIA Associate Professor
Forrest Wilson,Ph.D., Hon., AIA Professor Emeritus
John V. Yanik, M.Arch., AIA Professor
Barry Yatt,B.Arch., FAIA Professor

Associates of the Faculty

Ghassan Abukurah, B.S., Arch. Visiting Lecturer
Kent Abraham, M.Arch., AIA Adjunct Associate Professor
Rauzia Ally, M.Arch., AIA Visiting Critic
Patricia Andrasik, M.Arch., IIDA Visiting Critic
Raj Barr-Kumar,Ph.D., FAIA Visiting Lecturer
Timothy Barrows, B.Arch., AIA Visiting Lecturer
Primo J. Bautista, M.Arch. Visiting Critic
James L. Binkley, B.Arch., FAIA Lecturer
Janet Bloomberg, M.Arch., AIA Visiting Critic
Patrick Bodden, B.Arch. Visiting Critic
Garret Byrne, M.S.E, P.E. Visiting Critic
James Carder, Ph.D. Visiting Lecturer
Jennifer Carney, M.Arch., AIA Visiting Critic
Michael S.A. Dechert, Ph.D., AIA Lecturer
Kevin Dworak, M.Arch. Visiting Critic
Anthony Elmiger, M.S.E. Visiting Lecturer
Mary Johnson, M.Arch. Visiting Critic
Zachery Kates, M.S.C.E., P.E. Visiting Lecturer
David Kitchens, M.Arch., AIA Visiting Critic
Natalie McCorkle, M.Arch. Visiting Critic
Mark McInturff,B.Arch., AIA Visiting Critic
Judith Meany, Ph.D., AICP Adjunct Associate Professor
Iris Miller, M.Arch., ASLA Adjunct Associate Professor
Georges Mohasseb, B.Arch., Associate AIA Visiting Lecturer
Donald Beekman Myer, M.Arch., FAIA Visiting Critic
Raj Parikh, M.Arch. Visiting Critic
Travis L. Price III, M.Arch., AIA Visiting Critic
Suzanne Reatig,B.S.C. Arch., AIA Visiting Critic
Michelle A. Rinehart, M.S., M.Arch. Assistant Dean and Visiting Critic
Hugo Rodrigues, M.Arch. Visiting Critic
Milton Shinberg, B.Arch., RA Adjunct Associate Professor
David Shove-Brown, B.Arch., AIA Visiting Critic
Glenn Smith, M.Arch., ASLA Visiting Critic
William Smith, M.Arch. Visiting Critic
Alan Stover,AIA, CSI, Esq. Visiting Lecturer
Rafael Vargas, M.Arch. Visiting Lecturer
Lawrence Temple Washington, III, M.Arch. Associate Professor for Professional Practice

Mission

CUA?s School of Architecture and Planning attracts students from throughout the United States and the world who are aware of the school?s long history and educational renown. The professional architecture program at CUA was established in 1911, and after nine decades its reputation is expressed in a continuing legacy of design excellence?early Beaux Arts prizewinners to contemporary AIA award-winning faculty work and student projects.

In CUA?s School of Architecture and Planning, students are exposed to the foundational and the conventional, as well as to the experimental and unorthodox. Diverse theoretical perspectives, paradigms, project types from varied architects, landscape architects, urban designers and planners become key elements in our various teaching/learning activities. Our full-time faculty, along with a distinguished array of adjuncts and visiting lecturers and studio critics drawn from the profession, provide our students with an excellent, stimulating context within which they pursue their learning.

Goals

Historically, the profession of architecture has placed the highest priority on the artful creation of place, incorporating Vitruvius? three principles. Consequently, the architect must be well versed in the arts, technically skilled, and possess a deep understanding of the human condition. Thus, the school seeks to impart a proper sense of ethics and a spirit of service to the community and the emphasis on these qualities gives professional training its distinctive character at The Catholic University of America.

The School of Architecture and Planning is dedicated to the professional education of those who will design, build and conserve the built environment, principally as architects and planners. The goal of the undergraduate program is to provide the student with the knowledge, skills and abilities fundamental to his or her training as a professional, enriched with a broad foundation in the humanities.

Degree Programs

Assistant Dean for Undergraduate Studie
George J. Martin, M.Arch.

The Preprofessional Degree

CUA offers a four-year preprofessional undergraduate degree, Bachelor of Science in Architecture, and a Master of Architecture professional degree. The undergraduate program is offered to those seeking a foundation in the field of architecture, as preparation for continued education in a professional degree program, or for employment options in fields related to architecture. The undergraduate program in architecture consists of 137 semester credit hours of study, usually accomplished in four years of study.

The undergraduate curriculum introduces the student to the world of architecture in increasingly intensive stages. The first two years of study include introductory courses in design, history, theory, graphics, and computer applications, as well as a grounding in the liberal arts. The third and fourth years consist mainly of design, technology, and history offerings.

Interdisciplinary Studies

A dual degree program leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science in Architecture and Bachelor of Civil Engineering is available to students who want to combine the practice of architecture and engineering. Interested students should contact the School of Architecture and Planning for specific information.

Accreditation

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board, NAAB, which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a six-year, three-year, or two-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.

Master?s degree programs may consist of a preprofessional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

Location

CUA?s location in Washington, D.C., puts students in touch with unparalleled professional and cultural resources. CUA?s spacious campus lies within a 10-minute drive of the U.S. Capitol and the National Mall. Numerous national and international experts live and work in the vibrant and diverse metropolitan area and contribute to the undergraduate program each academic year.

The specialized expertise of these associates of the faculty allow the school to offer an outstanding array of graduate coursework. The school has had relationships with numerous Washington, D.C., cultural and artistic institutions, including the National Building Museum, the Library of Congress, and others. In addition, the school?s location offers it unparalleled access to many national chapter headquarters of various design-oriented organizations, such as The American Institute of Architects, AIA, the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, ACSA, the National Architectural Accrediting Board, NAAB, and the American Institute of Architecture Students, AIAS. The school has also over the last several years maintained a relationship with various embassies in the region, sponsoring cooperative lecture and exhibit programs with the Finnish embassy, the Swiss embassy, the Austrian embassy, and others.

Faculty and Resources

Many of our faculty members are recognized as leaders in the design and professional realms with world-famous guest critics and lecturers augmenting the full-time teaching staff. Student-to-professor ratios are kept small to ensure that students receive intensive one-on-one critiques and advising from studio critics and professors.

Our award-winning facilities are housed in the original CUA gymnasium and provide a classic example of adaptive re-use at its best. Designed by a faculty member, the architecture center was conceived as a small city with ?streets? filled with students and their work, a ?piazza? for special exhibits, and a ?town hall? for lectures and meetings. In addition, students? needs are served by our library CAD lab and output room, visual resource center and fabrication lab, which includes wood and metalworking shops, two Co2 laser cutter and engraving systems, a 3D printer and a three-axis CNC milling machine.

Through the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area, students may earn credits from among the several other institutions of higher learning in the community.

Foreign Studies

The School of Architecture and Planning offers a variety of foreign study options for undergraduate students. In the third year of the undergraduate curriculum students may participate in semester?long programs in Rome and Barcelona, both of which offer 18 credits of a studio and other related courses. Paris serves as the venue for selected fourth year undergraduate students, as well as graduate students. Our longest running foreign program, the Patrick Cardinal O?Boyle Summer Foreign Studies Program, is an offering exclusively reserved for graduate students. The program focuses on studio work in Rome and other parts of Italy, with additional travel to two other venues in and around Europe. Travel itineraries change from year to year to enable diverse faculty to plan trips around their past and present contacts and experiences. These programs are GPA-based. A seat in the Cardinal O?Boyle program can also be secured in an intensive design competition in the fourth year of the CUA B.S. in Architecture program.

In addition to these programs, CUA offers many other opportunities for domestic and foreign travel. The Spirit of Place|Spirit of Design program is a design?build program offered to both graduate and undergraduate students. Projects have been completed in a variety of locations, including Ireland, Nepal, and Peru. Opportunities also exist for students to participate in landscape and urban design studios in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East; environmental workshops at Casa Malaparte in Italy; and other auxiliary programs in Europe and North and Central America.

Special Programs

Summer Institute for Architecture

Each summer, the School of Architecture and Planning conducts the Summer Institute for Architecture, during which numerous courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels are offered, including most of the design studios as well as are most of the required technology courses. In addition, the school offers numerous courses in history of architecture, graphics, furniture design, landscape architecture, and other related areas. The faculty consists of selected members of the School of Architecture, and Planning and invited faculty from other institutions.

A component of the Summer Institute is the Jerusalem Studio, composed of upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level students who are taken on an intensive travel program to the ancient city of Jerusalem. After their travel, these students return to the university to complete a project assignment based on their investigations.

The Summer Institute accepts students from other academic units at The Catholic University of America and from other institutions. Interested students should contact the office of the School of Architecture and Planning for further information and applications.

Experiences in Architecture

Each summer the School of Architecture and Planning conducts two three-week sessions for high school or college students who are interested in investigating the field of architecture as a possible career. The students are introduced to all aspects of the study and practice of architecture, from design and history to office practice. The students live on campus and work in the design studios alongside architecture students attending the Summer Institute. Interested students should contact the office of the School of Architecture and Planning for further information and applications.

Degree Requirements

Policies are subject to change. Please consult the School of Architecture and Planning Web site at http://architecture.cua.edu for current policies and requirements.

English Requirement

All students are required to take two English courses. Normally these are ENG 101, Rhetoric and Composition, and ENG 102, Composition and Introduction to Literature; however, some students may be placed in ENG 111/ 112 in lieu of ENG 101. Students who are able to place out of either or both of these courses are required to fulfill these credit requirements with electives in English. Students may receive advanced placement credit for these courses. Students who receive less than a C- in ENG 101 or ENG 111/112 will be required to repeat the course.

Mathematics Requirement

The mathematics requirement for the architecture program is one semester of MATH 120, Elementary Functions. All incoming freshmen will be required to take the math placement test. Architecture students who score 3 on this test will be required to take MATH 101, Review of Basic Mathematics, prior to taking MATH 120. (Note: This is a remedial course and its credits will not count toward the architecture degree requirements.) Students who score 2 will be placed in MATH 120. Students who score 1 will be waived from MATH 120; however, they must fulfill the credit requirement with MATH 121 or a free elective.

Advanced Placement Course Credit

Students who take Advanced Placement courses as part of their high school curriculum may receive college credit for these courses provided they earn a score of 4 or 5 on the AP examination. Official test scores must be submitted to the School of Architecture and Planning before such credit can be given.

Transfer Students

The School of Architecture and Planning accepts transfer students at all levels, depending on the availability of studio space. Transfer students can be accepted for both the first and second semesters. Transfer students who have experience in architectural design will receive studio assignments based on a review of their portfolios. Portfolios are required as part of the application process for these students. Undergraduate transfer applicants should have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.70. Students interested in transferring to The Catholic University of America should contact the university?s Office of Admissions for an application and other pertinent information. Graduate transfer applicants should contact the School of Architecture and Planning directly.

Transfer Students Holding an Associate Degree in Architecture

Students who hold an associate degree in architectural science or an equivalent degree from a two-year community college may be eligible for the special program leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Architecture described below. Students are admitted to this program only in the summer. A minimum grade point average of 2.70 is required for admission. Students who are accepted for the program will be admitted with junior status. Students in this program who do not have courses in the history of architecture as part of their background will be required to take these as program electives. Students may be able to place out of ARCH 201 and/or 202 by portfolio review. Students who place out of any course in the program must take elective courses to fulfill the credit requirements for these courses. Interested students should contact the university?s Office of Admissions for further information.

Transfer students accepted from a community college with which Catholic University has an articulation agreement must complete their Associates, A.A., degree in architecture or construction technology and submit an official transcript showing its completion with one (1) semester (not including summer) of entering the Bachelor of Science in Architecture, B.S. Arch., 2.5-year track. If the A.A. degree remains incomplete after one semester, the student will be moved into the standard four-year B.S. Arch. degree track and be responsible for all courses required therein.

Special Program for the Hearing Impaired

In concert with Galluadet University, located in Washington, D.C., the School of Architecture and Planning offers a program in architecture for hearing impaired students. Under this program students complete their mathematics and liberal arts and humanities courses at Gallaudet University, then transfer to The Catholic University of America to complete their architectural studies. Interested students should contact the admissions office of Gallaudet University.

Grading and Progression Policies

1. A student in the School of Architecture and Planning must maintain a cumulative grade point average, GPA, of 2.0 in order to be in good
academic standing.
2. A minimum grade of C- is required in all architecture courses.
3. A minimum grade of C- is required to advance in all sequenced courses:
a. Freshman Experience: ARCH100→ARCH104
b. Studio: ARCH104→201→202→301→302→401→402
c. History: ARCH135→136→235
d. Construction: ARCH315→316
e. Structures: ARCH321→322→421
f. Environmental Systems: ARCH358→457

NOTES: Students may proceed through courses out of sequence, but must receive a minimum grade of C- in their first sequenced course in order to enroll in the second course.

Policies Concerning Probation and Dismissal

1. Students whose semester grade point average, GPA or whose cumulative GPA falls below 2.00 will be placed on academic probation.
2. A student on academic probation cannot enroll in any studio course (ARCH 104, 201, 202, 301, 302, 401, 402).
3. Students who remain on academic probation for two consecutive semesters or have been on academic probation for any three semesters are subject to academic dismissal.
4. A student who has discontinued following the architecture curriculum after two semesters is also subject to dismissal if he or she does not transfer to another school within the university.
5. Other conditions for dismissal are described in the front section of these Announcements.

Academic Standards and Requirements for Graduation

The undergraduate program consists of 137 semester credit hours. A student must have at least a 2.0 cumulative grade point average and their average for second-year design studio must be above 2.0 in order to advance to the third-year design studio. Students with a C average or below in design must retake the last studio and must raise their design studio average above 2.0 before they may advance to the next studio level. A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 in all courses is required for graduation.

Other Information

Student Government and Professional Organizations

A number of student organizations offer opportunities for students to participate in the governance of the school and act as liaisons to professional organizations. Students of the school elect representatives to the Student Council, who, in turn, represent the student body at faculty meetings and on the University Student Council.

The school also offers student membership in the American Institute of Architecture Students and the Construction Specification Institute. Both organizations sponsor important events such as the annual job fair and professional conferences.

Advising

Once admitted to the School of Architecture and Planning, each student is assigned an academic adviser. Normally, the students remain with their assigned adviser for the duration of their program if possible. Given sufficient reason, the student may be reassigned to another adviser at the discretion of the associate dean. All students are required to see their advisers at least once a semester for pre-registration for the next semester?s classes. Students are responsible for knowing the requirements of their specific programs and for keeping track of their progress in working toward their degrees. However, students may see their adviser at any time during the academic year regarding their academic program and status.

Program of Studies

Core Program?Suggested Sequence

First year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

ARCH 100 Introduction to Architecture 3 -
ARCH 104 Intro to Architectural Presentation - 3
ARCH 135,136 History of Architecture I, II 3 3
ARCH 115 Introduction to Digital Media - 3
ENG 101,102 Intro to Literature, English Comp. 3 3
MATH 120 Elementary Functions 3 -
PHYS 101 20th Century Concepts - 3

 

Liberal Studies Elective I 3 -

 

Total

15

15

Second Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

ARCH 201, 202 Intro to Architectural Design I, II 6 6
ARCH 216 Design Thinking 3 -
ARCH 235 History of Modern Architecture 3 -
PHIL 201, 202 Classical Mind, Modern Mind 3 3
TRS 200-261[1] Introductory level Religion Elective I, II 3 3
TRS Religion Elective III - 3

 

Social Science Elective I[2] - 3

 

Total

18

18

Third Year[3]

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

ARCH 301, 302

Architectural Design I, II

6

6

ARCH 315, 316

Predesign, Assemblies

4

4

ARCH 321, 322

Structures I, II

3

3

ARCH 261

Digital Construction Documents

3

-

ARCH 443

Introduction to Architectural Theory

3

-

ARCH

Program Elective I

-

3

 

Liberal Studies Elective II

-

3

 

Total

19

19

Fourth Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

ARCH 401, 402

Architectural Design III, IV

6

6

ARCH 358, 457

Environmental Systems I, II

3

3

ARCH 421

Structures III

3

-

ARCH

History of Architecture Elective

3

-

ARCH

Program Elective II

-

3

ARCH 407

Comp. Building Studio Supplement

-

3

 

Liberal Studies Elective III

3

-

 

Total

18

15

Program of Studies for Students Who Hold a Two-Year Associate Degree In Architecture?
Suggested Sequence[4] (Total Credits required for the B.S.Arch. degree = 84)

Summer Session

Course #

Course Title

Hrs

ARCH 201

Architectural Design

6

First Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

ARCH 202, 302

Architectural Design

6

6

ARCH 509

Green Architecture

3

-

PHIL 201, 202

Classical Mind, Modern Mind

3

3

TRS 200 level

Religion Elective I

3

-

 

Liberal Studies Elective I

3

-

ARCH 115

Introduction to Digital Media

-

3

ARCH

Program Elective I

-

3

ARCH

One of the following: History of Arch. Elective I, Structures I, II

-

3

 

Total

18

18

Summer Session

Course #

Course Title

Hrs

ARCH 301

Architectural Design

6

ARCH 115[5]

Introduction to Digital Media

3

PHIL 202*

Modern Mind

3

Second Year

Course #

Course Title

1st

2nd

ARCH 401, 402

Architectural Design

6

6

ARCH 519

Comp. Building Studio Supplement

-

3

ARCH 421

Structures III

3

-

ARCH 443

Introduction To Architectural Theory

3

-

ARCH

History of Architecture Elective

-

3

ARCH

Program Elective I, II

3

3

 

Liberal Studies Elective I, II

3

3

 

Total

18

18

Conditions

1. A.A. degree students are admitted with junior status.
2. A.A. degree students who do not have history of architecture as part of their background will be required to take ARCH 135, 136, and 235 as part of their elective requirements.
3. A requirement for admission to the program is a minimum grade point average of 2.70.
4. Students who do not have statics and strength of materials as part of their background will be required to take ARCH 321, 322 as Program Electives

Courses Offered

The courses listed below are those offered on a regular basis by the school. The school offers numerous elective courses each semester, which individually are not offered on a regular basis and therefore are not included in this listing.

ARCH

Title

100

Introduction to Architecture

104

Introduction Architectural Presentation

115

Introduction to Digital Media

135

History of Architecture I

136

History of Architecture II

201

Introduction to Architectural Design I (6)

202

Introduction to Architectural Design II (6)

206

Introduction to Techniques in Rapid Prototyping

216

Design Thinking

235

History III: Modern Architecture

261

Digital Construction Documents

301

Architectural Design I (6)

302

Architectural Design II (6)

303

Architectural Design (6)

315

Pre?Design (4)

316

Building Assemblies (4)

321

Structures I

322

Structures II

358

Environmental Design I

393

Independent Study (1)

395

Independent Study (3)

401

Architectural Design III (6)

402

Architectural Design IV (6)

406

Architectural Design Studio (9)

421

Structures III

438

Research in Architectural History

443

Architectural Theory: Texts and Contexts

457

Environmental Design II

464

Advanced Topics in CAD

585

Construction Management

495

Independent Study

507

Architectural Design FAAR (9)

509

Green Architecture

510

Religious Space

514

Basic Digital Visualization

521

Specifications

527

Reflections on Practice

528

Practice Research

529

Introduction to Contemporary Urban Planning

538

Research-History Architecture

539

Profiles in American Architecture

540

City Vision

546

Preservation: Themes and Method

547

History of American City Planning

550

Spirit of Place

551

Elements of the General Plan

553

Islamic Architecture

554

Oriental Landscape and Culture

556

Architecture and the Moving Image

557

Historical Preservation Fieldwork

558

A Design Attitude-Environment

564

Housing

567

History and Theory of Urban Form

569

Innovations in Urban Planning & Design

570

Drawing as Visualization

571

Advanced Visual Tools

579

Architecture and the Internet

580

Architecture in the Schools

582

Building Conservation Technology for Historic Structures

587

Real Estate Development

590

Furniture Design: Form and Concept

592

The Designed Object

597

Advanced Rendering Techniques

[1] Students who have little familiarity with the Judeo-Christian tradition may substitute REL 103.

[2] Social Science elective requirement is three semester hours in one of the following: Anthropology, Psychology, Political Science, or Sociology.

[3] Third year students who opt for the undergraduate foreign program in the Spring semester will be required to take ARCH 316 and ARCH 322 in Summer Session.

[4] Students who have taken any of the required courses will not be required to retake those courses but must fulfill the credits through approved electives. No courses taken to satisfy the A.A. degree can be used toward the B.S.Arch. degree.

[5] These courses must be taken by students who were abroad during the previous spring semester.