The Catholic University of America

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND PLANNING

Officers of Instruction

Faculty

Randall Ott, M.Arch., AIA
Dean, Professor
Ann Cederna, M.Arch.,AIA
Associate Dean, Associate Professor
George J. Martin, M.Arch.
Assistant Dean, Assistant Professor
Eric J. Jenkins, M.Arch., M.Des.S., AIA
Assistant Dean, Assistant Professor
Raj Barr-Kumar, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Carlos Roberto Barrios, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Luis Eduardo Boza, M.Arch.
Associate Professor
Hazel R. Edwards, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Mohamed Elnahas, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
Lavinia Fici Pasquina,M.Arch., RA (Italy)
Associate Professor
Christopher P. Grech, B.Arch.
Associate Professor
Vytenis Gureckas, M.S.B.D., RA
Associate Professor
Miriam Gusevich, M.Arch.
Associate Professor
Stanley I. Hallet, M.Arch., FAIA
Professor
William A. Jelen, M.Arch., AIA
Visiting Assistant Professor
J. Ronald Kabriel, M.Arch.
Assistant Professor
Julius S. Levine, B.S.CE., M.CP., FAICP
Professor
George T. Marcou, M.Arch., AICP
Professor Emeritus
Andreea Mihalache, Ph.D.
Visiting Assistant Professor
Adnan Morshed, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Theodore Naos, M.Arch.
Professor
Walter D. Ramberg, B.Arch., AIA
Professor Emeritus
Terrance Williams, M.Arch., FAIA
Associate Professor
Forrest Wilson,Ph.D., Hon., AIA
Professor Emeritus
John V. Yanik, M.Arch., AIA
Professor
Barry Yatt,B.Arch., FAIA
Professor
Associates of the Faculty
Ghassan Abukurah, B.S., Arch.
Visiting Lecturer
Kent Abraham, M.Arch., AIA
Adjunct Associate Professor
Rauzia Ally, M.Arch., AIA
Visiting Critic
Patricia Andrasik, M.Arch., IIDA
Visiting Critic
Raj Barr-Kumar,Ph.D., FAIA
Visiting Lecturer
Timothy Barrows, B.Arch., AIA
Visiting Lecturer
Primo J. Bautista, M.Arch.
Visiting Critic
James L. Binkley, B.Arch., FAIA
Lecturer
Janet Bloomberg, M.Arch., AIA
Visiting Critic
Patrick Bodden, B.Arch.
Visiting Critic
Garret Byrne, M.S.E, P.E.
Visiting Critic
James Carder, Ph.D.
Visiting Lecturer
Jennifer Carney, M.Arch., AIA
Visiting Critic
Michael S.A. Dechert, Ph.D., AIA
Lecturer
Kevin Dworak, M.Arch.
Visiting Critic
Anthony Elmiger, M.S.E.
Visiting Lecturer
Mary Johnson, M.Arch.
Visiting Critic
Zachery Kates, M.S.C.E., P.E.
Visiting Lecturer
David Kitchens, M.Arch., AIA
Visiting Critic
Natalie McCorkle, M.Arch.
Visiting Critic
Mark McInturff,B.Arch., AIA
Visiting Critic
Judith Meany, Ph.D., AICP
Adjunct Associate Professor
Iris Miller, M.Arch., ASLA
Adjunct Associate Professor
Georges Mohasseb, B.Arch., Associate AIA
Visiting Lecturer
Donald Beekman Myer, M.Arch., FAIA
Visiting Critic
Raj Parikh, M.Arch.
Visiting Critic
Travis L. Price III, M.Arch., AIA
Visiting Critic
Suzanne Reatig,B.S.C. Arch., AIA
Visiting Critic
Michelle A. Rinehart, M.S., M.Arch.
Assistant Dean and Visiting Critic
Hugo Rodrigues, M.Arch.
Visiting Critic
Milton Shinberg, B.Arch., RA
Adjunct Associate Professor
David Shove-Brown, B.Arch., AIA
Visiting Critic
Glenn Smith, M.Arch., ASLA
Visiting Critic
William Smith, M.Arch.
Visiting Critic
Alan Stover,AIA, CSI, Esq.
Visiting Lecturer
Rafael Vargas, M.Arch.
Visiting Lecturer
Lawrence Temple Washington, III, M.Arch.
Associate Professor for Professional Practice

Mission

CUA's School of Architecture and Planning attracts students from throughout the United States and the world who are aware of the school's long history and educational renown. The professional architecture program at CUA was established in 1911, and after nine decades its reputation is expressed in a continuing legacy of design excellence-early Beaux Arts prizewinners to contemporary AIA award-winning faculty work and student projects.

In CUA's School of Architecture and Planning, students are exposed to the foundational and the conventional, as well as to the experimental and unorthodox. Diverse theoretical perspectives, paradigms, project types from varied architects landscape architects, urban designers and planners become key elements in our various teaching/learning activities. Our full-time faculty, along with a distinguished array of adjuncts and visiting lecturers and studio critics drawn from the profession, provide our students with an excellent, stimulating context within which they pursue their learning.

Goals

Historically, the profession of architecture has placed the highest priority on the artful creation of place, incorporating the great Roman architect/engineer Vitruvius' three principles of firmness, commodity and delight. Consequently, the architect must be well versed in the arts, technically skilled, and possess a deep understanding of the human condition. Thus, the school seeks to impart a proper sense of ethics and a spirit of service to the community. The emphasis on these qualities gives professional training its distinctive character at The Catholic University of America.

The School of Architecture and Planning is dedicated to the professional education of those who will design, build and conserve the built environment, principally as architects and planners. Utilizing Washington and other metropolitan areas as design laboratories, the graduate program provides an enriching educational climate in which students investigate the realms of design, theory and building in the context of the world in which we live. Students are exposed to a diversity of architectural experiences through a choice of graduate concentrations that include Cultural Studies/Sacred Space, Design Technologies, Digital Media, Real Estate Development, and Urban Design.

Central to the graduate program is the design studio, where students pursue their architectural inquiries individually or in teams. Design studios are directed by faculty members who have extensive experience in both practice and teaching. Visiting critics whose professional experience is relevant to the studio projects are brought into the school to provide richness and diversity to the students' design education. The studio experience culminates in a design thesis. Supporting the studio experience are advanced courses in architecture, planning and related fields. Lectures, seminars and exhibitions are devised to introduce the student to the multitude of considerations faced by the practicing architect to reveal differing philosophies and attitudes toward architectural design. As in the studios, lecturers are invited from among the many outstanding professionals practicing in the Washington area to provide informal talks on their current work, teach or add their particular insights to the core courses.

Degree Programs

Ann Cederna, M.Arch., AIA
Associate Dean for Graduate Studies


The Professional Degree

CUA offers several options for earning the Master of Architecture professional degree. The two-year M.Arch. program is intended for students with a four-year undergraduate preprofessional degree in architecture. Select students graduating from CUA with a four-year Bachelor of Science in Architecture may be eligible for advanced standing, thereby reducing graduate study from four semesters to three semesters. The three-year M.Arch. program is intended for students who hold an undergraduate degree in a field other than architecture. These Master of Architecture degree programs are fully accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board.

The Post-Professional Degree Program

The Master of Architectural Studies is offered to applicants who already hold a professional degree in architecture and wish to pursue further investigations in design or design-related topics. Students are offered an intensive curriculum in one of five areas of concentration: Cultural Studies/Sacred Space, Design Technologies, Digital Media, Real Estate Development, and Urban Design. The program requires a minimum of one-and-a-half years of advanced study tailored to the needs and interests of the individual.

Accreditation

In the United States, most state registration boards require a degree from an accredited professional degree program as a prerequisite for licensure. The National Architectural Accrediting Board, NAAB, which is the sole agency authorized to accredit U.S. professional degree programs in architecture, recognizes three types of degrees: the Bachelor of Architecture, the Master of Architecture, and the Doctor of Architecture. A program may be granted a 6-year, 3-year, or 2-year term of accreditation, depending on the extent of its conformance with established educational standards.

Master's degree programs may consist of a preprofessional undergraduate degree and a professional graduate degree that, when earned sequentially, constitute an accredited professional education. However, the preprofessional degree is not, by itself, recognized as an accredited degree.

Location

CUA's location in Washington, D.C., puts students in touch with unparalleled professional and cultural resources. Its spacious campus lies within a 10- minute drive of the U.S. Capitol and the National Mall. Numerous national and international experts live and work in the vibrant and diverse metropolitan area and contribute to the graduate program each academic year.

The specialized expertise of these associates of the faculty allow the school to offer an outstanding array of graduate coursework. The school has had relationships with numerous Washington, D.C., cultural and artistic institutions, including the National Building Museum, the Library of Congress and others. In addition, the school's location offers it unparalleled access to many national chapter headquarters of various design-oriented organizations, such as The American Institute of Architects, AIA, the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture, ACSA, the National Architectural Accrediting Board, NAAB and the American Institute of Architecture Students, AIAS. The school has also over the last several years maintained a relationship with various embassies in the region, sponsoring cooperative lecture and exhibit programs with the Finnish embassy, the Swiss embassy, the Austrian embassy and others.

Faculty and Resources

Many of our faculty members are recognized as leaders in the design and professional realms with world-famous guest critics and lecturers augmenting the full-time teaching staff. Student-to-professor ratios are kept small to ensure that students receive intensive one-on-one critiques and advising from studio critics and professors.

Our award-winning facilities are housed in the original CUA gymnasium and provide a classic example of adaptive re-use at its best. Designed by a faculty member, the architecture center was conceived as a small city with "streets" filled with students and their work, a "piazza" for special exhibits and a "town hall" for lectures and meetings. In addition, students' needs are served by our library CAD lab and output room, visual resource center and fabrication lab, which includes wood and metalworking shops, two CO2 laser cutter and engraving systems, a 3D printer and a three-axis CNC milling machine.

Through the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area, students may earn credits from among the several other institutions of higher learning in the community.

Concentrations

The School of Architecture and Planning currently offers five areas of concentration available to students for more focused specialization during their graduate education. These are Cultural Studies/Sacred Space, Design Technologies, Digital Media, Real Estate Development, and Urban Design.

Cultural Studies/Sacred Space

The pursuit of cultural studies and the investigation and design of sacred space is intrinsic to CUA's mission. This concentration affords students an opportunity to explore cultural studies and the related issues of settlement, geography and landscape. The studios and related seminars explore a variety of historic case studies, theoretical positions and architectural strategies that have been or can be taken when architects are obliged to intervene in arenas of great cultural context and, in particular, in the re-articulation of sacred space.

The dilemma of relating the exigencies of our "time" to the traditional forms and rituals of the past are only further complicated by a situation where once identifiable cultural groups have now been thrown into disjunction, discontinuity and disarray. Thus, the often irreconcilable debate between "natural state" and chaos, between nostalgia for the past and the "crisis of modernity," between critical regionalism and international style, become but a few of the issues the concentration examines. (Director: Travis L. Price III, AIA, adjunct professor; e-mail: pricet@cua,edu).

Design Technologies

Simultaneously investigated at various scales ranging from global/local ecologies to building and product development processes, this concentration considers advanced and innovative design technologies as catalytic tools for design inspiration and investigation. The Design Technologies concentration continually examines the transformative opportunities of emerging technologies during all phases of design, from conception through construction and far past completion. Interdisciplinary in nature, the concentration engages itself in emerging and innovative fields of inquiry and research collaborating with the profession as well as pre-established organization within the university, such as CUA Design Collaborative, CUAdc, and the Design Lab. The Design Technologies concentration comprises four separate yet interrelated components of specialization: Advanced Material Research and Theory, Computational Design and Morphology, Digital Fabrication and Design/Build, and Sustainable and Environmental Technologies and Theory. (Director: Luis Eduardo Boza, assistant professor; tel: 202-319-6861; e-mail: boza@cua.edu).

Digital Media

The profession of architecture is challenged by digital technologies in many ways. Some of these technologies expand the way we create, understand and modify space, as well as the way we experience it. The use of digital technologies ultimately influences the way architects approach design, practice and build. Three-dimensional modeling and visualization software offer alternatives to the development of form and the outcome of the designer's "vision." Animation, rendering and special effects editing tools also influence the way a design is communicated and perceived. (Director: Lavinia Fici Pasquina, assistant professor; tel: 202-319-6719; e-mail: ficipasquina@cua.edu).

Real Estate Development (Evening program)

Modern architecture practice encompasses a wide array of architecture design challenges with a growing emphasis on privately financed residential and commercial real estate development projects. Real estate development in the 21st century includes a broad range of projects including urban mixed use, suburban new towns and adaptive reuse of historic structures, all requiring design expertise. Practicing architects can significantly enhance the quality of built environment, while at the same time taking advantage of potential business opportunities to share in these market-driven forces through an educational grounding in the fundamentals of real estate development. (Director: Judith Meany, Ph.D., AICP, adjunct associate professor; tel: 202-319-5642; e-mail: jmeany@lozierpartners.com).

Urban Design

Urban design is the keystone that links architecture and planning. The spatial concerns of the architect and the public policy issues of the planner are brought together by the urban designer to create an implementable vision for the city that moves beyond the individual building and the limits of policies focused primarily on public health, welfare and safety. The Urban Design concentration emphasizes the relationship of an individual project to the public realm. This concentration expands a graduate's design options to include opportunities in both the private and public sectors, here and abroad. (Director: Terrance Williams, FAIA, associate professor; tel: 202-319-5565; e-mail: williams@cua.edu).

Foreign Studies

The School of Architecture and Planning offers a variety of foreign study options for graduate students. To complement our undergraduate semester-long programs in Rome and Barcelona, Paris serves as the venue for the graduate students, as well as selected fourth year undergraduate students. All graduate students may participate in the 18-credit program. Utilizing various modern and historical sites, students are introduced to the interconnectedness of the public and private realms with issues of urban density, security, convenience and amenity. CUA students and faculty collaborate with their counterparts from local universities, as well as world-renowned architects based in Paris. The studio is augmented by travel, seminars and lectures by local faculty.

Our longest running foreign program, the Patrick Cardinal O'Boyle Summer Foreign Studies Program, is an offering exclusively reserved for graduate students. The program focuses on studio work in Rome and other parts of Italy, with additional travel to two other venues in and around Europe. Travel itineraries change from year to year to enable diverse faculty to plan trips around their past and present contacts and experiences. These programs are GPA-based and participating students earn 15 credits toward the professional degree. A seat in the Cardinal O'Boyle program can also be secured in an intensive design competition in the fourth-year of the CUA B.S. in Architecture program.

Each year two graduate students are selected to spend the fall semester studying at the Fondazione Architetto Augusto Rancilio in Milan, Italy. The students are awarded scholarships by the foundation and pursue independent research on a theme established by FAAR and CUA. Themes may include architectural history and theory, design, urban studies or technology. Participating students earn 15 credits toward the professional degree.

In addition to these programs, CUA offers many other opportunities for domestic and foreign travel. The Spirit of Place|Spirit of Design program is a design-build program offered to both graduate and undergraduate students. Projects have been completed in a variety of locations, including Ireland, Nepal and Peru. Opportunities also exist for students to participate in landscape and urban design studios in Asia, Europe and the Middle East, and other auxiliary programs in Europe and North and Central America.

Special Programs


Summer Institute for Architecture

Each summer, the School of Architecture and Planning conducts the Summer Institute for Architecture, during which numerous courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels are offered. Most of the design studios are offered, as are most of the required technology courses. In addition, the school offers numerous courses in history of architecture, graphics, furniture design, landscape architecture and other related areas. The faculty consists of selected members of the School of Architecture and Planning and invited faculty from other institutions.

A component of the Summer Institute is the Jerusalem Studio. This program is composed of upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level students who take part in an intensive travel program to the ancient city of Jerusalem. After their travel, these students return to the university to complete a project assignment based on their investigations.

The Summer Institute accepts students from other academic units at The Catholic University of America, and from other institutions. Interested students should contact the office of the School of Architecture and Planning for further information and applications.

Experiences in Architecture

Each summer the School of Architecture and Planning conducts two three-week sessions for high school or college students who are interested in investigating the field of architecture as a possible career. The students are introduced to all aspects of the study and practice of architecture, from design and history to office practice. The students live on campus and work in the design studios alongside architecture students attending the Summer Institute. Interested students should contact the office of the School of Architecture and Planning for further information and applications.

Admissions

Policies are subject to change. Please consult the School of Architecture and Planning Web site at http://architecture.cua.edu for current policies and requirements.

The following are required for admission into all graduate programs:

  • A minimum GPA of 2.8 (out of a possible 4.0) in undergraduate studies

  • A completed application

  • Statement of purpose

  • Certified transcripts

  • Three letters of recommendation

  • Official GRE scores (minimum: 1000)

A portfolio demonstrating design excellence over a broad range of architectural and technical challenges is required for all applications to the two-year M.Arch. program and the postprofessional Master of Science in Architectural Studies.

Students applying to the three-year M.Arch. program must have completed two prerequisites for acceptance: pre-calculus math and an introductory course in physics emphasizing mechanics.

The application deadline for all programs is January 15.

Degree Requirements

Policies are subject to change. Please consult the School of Architecture and Planning Web site at http://architecture.cua.edu for current policies and requirements.

A minimum grade point average of 3.0 in graduate studies is required for graduation in all degree programs.

Master of Architecture (Two-Year Program)


The Program

Students accepted into this program are admitted as Master of Architecture degree candidates, but must complete any undergraduate design studio and professional and technical courses in which their background is deficient, in addition to the graduate course requirements. The academic and work background of each student entering the program in this category is thoroughly reviewed. Based on this review, a degree program will be individually tailored to fit the needs of the student. Students entering the program with professional experience might be allowed to skip certain classes, but the credits must be fulfilled with a program elective or by way of transferring credit for previously taken equivalents. If transfer credit is not applicable then the credits will have to be replaced by taking other courses offered by the school.

 

Program of Studies Semester Hours
Semester 1  
ARCH 601 Architectural Design Themed Studio I 6
ARCH--- Required course associated with the themed studio 3
ARCH 661 Digital Construction Documents 3
Concentration Elective 3
Semester 2  
ARCH 577 Advanced Theory of Architecture
or approved equivalent
3
ARCH 503 Comprehensive Building Design Studio 6
ARCH 518 Comprehensive Studio Supplement 3
ARCH Concentration Elective 3
Semester 3  
ARCH 603 Architectural Design Themed Studio II 6
ARCH---Required course associated with the themed studio 3
ARCH---Concentration Elective 3
ARCH 600 Thesis Research 3
Semester 4  
ARCH 609 Thesis 9
ARCH 717 Practice Management 4
Free Elective 3
Total Credits 61

Students awarded advanced standing must meet with the associate dean for graduate studies to develop their program of studies. Students with advanced standing must complete 46 semester credit hours in design, history/theory, technology, planning and professional practice.

Students must achieve at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in order to fulfill the requirements for the degree. Students may be allowed to repeat courses to improve their standing. In such cases, the highest grade earned in those courses will be considered in determining academic standing.

Since a C grade is passing but marginal at the graduate level, C grades are permitted in a maximum of one-third of the courses required for the degree. A grade of C in studio courses is not acceptable; students who earn C grades may repeat only one studio course.

Master of Architecture (Three-Year Program)


The Program

Students accepted to this program must complete the graduate course requirements plus those basic architecture courses in which their background is deficient. The academic and work background of each student entering the program in this category will be thoroughly reviewed. Based on this review, a degree program will be tailored to fit the needs of the student. In most cases, the student can expect to be enrolled in both graduate and the basic courses at the same time. The design studio and the mathematics/technical courses are the heart of the curriculum and rely heavily on an extended sequence of prerequisites. Students will be placed in each sequence according to their academic background and experience.

Students will be advanced according to their demonstrated abilities. Summer school may be utilized to facilitate the student's advancement. Admission to the 600 level design studios will be on the basis of portfolio review and approval. Students entering the program with professional experience might be allowed to skip certain classes, but the credits must be fulfilled with a program elective or by way of transferring credit for previously taken equivalents.

 

Program of Studies Semester Hours
ARCH 504 Intro to Design and Graphics
(Summer Course)
6
Semester 1  
ARCH 501 Studio I 6
ARCH 621 Structures I 3
ARCH 715 Pre-Design 4
ARCH 635 History of Architecture I 3
ARCH 543 Basic Reading in Arch Theory 3
Semester 2  
ARCH 502 Studio II 6
ARCH 622 Structures II 3
ARCH 716 Designing Construction 4
ARCH 758 Environmental Systems I 3
ARCH 636 History of Architecture II 3
ARCH 515 Introduction to Digital Media 3
Semester 3  
ARCH 601 Architectural Design Themed Studio I 6
ARCH-Required course associated with the themed studio 3
ARCH 721 Structures III 3
ARCH 735 History of Architecture III (Modern) 3
ARCH 757 Environmental Systems II 3
ARCH 661 Digital Construction Documents 3
Semester 4  
ARCH 503 Studio III: Comp. Bldg Studio 6
ARCH 518 Comprehensive Building Design Supplement 3
ARCH-Concentration Elective 3
ARCH 577 Advanced Theory of Architecture or approved equivalent 3
Semester 5  
ARCH 603 Architectural Design Themed Studio II 6
ARCH-Required course associated with the themed studio 3
ARCH-Concentration Elective 3
ARCH 600 Thesis Research 3
Semester 6  
ARCH 609 Thesis Design 9
ARCH 717 Professional Practice 4
Total Credits 111

Students must achieve at least a 3.0 cumulative grade point average in order to fulfill the requirements for the degree. Students may be allowed to repeat courses to improve their standing. In such cases, the highest grade earned in those courses will be considered in determining academic standing.

Since a C grade is passing but marginal at the graduate level, C grades are permitted in a maximum of one-third of the courses required for the degree. A grade of C in studio courses is not acceptable; students who earn C grades may repeat only one studio course.

Master of Architectural Studies (One-and-a-half-Year Program)


Admission

Acceptance is dependent on overall academic performance as an undergraduate and graduate student, the applicant's specific design interests, and the strengths and ability of the faculty to serve those interests. In the admission review process, special attention is given to the comprehensive design portfolio, statement of intent, professional experience, any related research and publications, and pertinent references. Persons interested in this program are encouraged to discuss their academic goals with the graduate program adviser in advance of making a formal application.

Various areas of concentration are available in this degree program (refer to section on concentrations above).

Program of Studies Semester Hours
ARCH 701 Master of Architectural Studies Themed Studio I 6
ARCH 702 Master of Architectural Studies Themed Studio II 6
ARCH 791 Thesis Field Work and Research 3
ARCH 795 Independent Study/Internship 3
ARCH 799 Master of Architectural Studies Thesis 9
ARCH-History/Theory Elective 3
ARCH-Program Electives (two) 6
Total Credits 36

Other Information

Student Government and Professional Organizations

A number of student organizations offer opportunities for students to participate in the governance of the school and act as liaisons to professional organizations. Students of the school elect representatives to the Student Council, who, in turn, represent the student body at faculty meetings and on the University Student Council.

The school also offers student membership in the American Institute of Architecture Students and the Construction Specification Institute. Both organizations sponsor important events such as the annual job fair and professional conferences.

Advising

Once admitted to the School of Architecture and Planning, each student is assigned an academic adviser. Normally, the students remain with their assigned adviser for the duration of their program if possible. Given sufficient reason, the student may be reassigned to another adviser at the discretion of the associate dean. All students are required to see their advisers at least once a semester for pre-registration for the next semester's classes. Students are responsible for knowing the requirements of their specific programs and for keeping track of their progress in working toward their degrees. However, students may see their adviser at any time during the academic year regarding their academic program and status.

Courses Offered

Please consult the registrar's Web site at https://cardinalstation.cua.edu for descriptions of courses offered in the current semester.

 

ARCH Course Title
500 Thesis Research-FAAR
501 Architectural Design I
502 Architectural Design II
503 Architectural Design III
504 Intro to Design and Graphics
505 GPS Architectural DesignStudio
507 Architectural Design FAAR
509 Green Architecture
510 Religious Space
514 Basic Digital Visualization
515 Introduction to Digital Media
517 Rapid Prototyping Techniques
521 Specifications
523 Architecture Italian FAAR
524 Sacred-Cult Studio Suplmnt I
527 Reflections on Practice
528 Practice Research
529 Intro Contemporary Urban Plan
530 Applied Urban Design Theory
531 Special Topics in Architecture
532 Intro to Digital Tools
533 Material Matters
536 Design Writing
537 Design Writing II
538 Research-History Architecture
539 Profiles in American Architecture
540 City Visions
541 Palladio and His Influence
542 House of Abraham: Ecumenical Sp
543 Basic Arch Theory
546 Preservation:Themes and Method
547 History American City Planning
548 Gardens and Urban Landscape
550 Spirit of Place
551 Elements of the General Plan
553 Islamic Architecture
554 Oriental Landscape and Culture
555 Practice Law & Real Estate
556 Arch and the Moving Image
557 Hist Preservation Fieldwork
558 Environ Sensitive Design
559 Arch Theory/History FAAR
560 Arch Studies Abroad GFS
561 American Studies
562 Design & Development:Malaparte
564 Affordable Housing
566 Mixed Use of Development
567 Hist and Theory of Urban Form
568 Topics in Preservation
569 Innovations in Urb Plan & Dsgn
570 Drawing as Visualization
571 Advanced Visual Tools
573 Special Topics in Arch Theory
574 Undergrad Foreign Studies Prog
575 Undergrad Foreign Studies Prog
577 Advanced Architecture Theory
579 Architecture and the Internet
580 Architecture in the Schools
582 Bldg Conserv Tech for Hist Str
584 Undergrad Foreign Studies Prog
585 Construction Management
586 "Public City, Private Building"
587 Real Estate Development
590 Furn. Design: Form and Concept
591 Readings Contemp Arch Theory
592 The Designed Object
595 Independent Studies
597 Advanced Rendering Techniques
600 Thesis Research
601 Themed Studio
602 Design Thesis
603 Themed Studio
604 Summer Studio Abroad
606 Written Thesis
607 Written Thesis
609 Thesis with Consultants
611 Dig Fab Studio Suplment I
612 Intro to Parametric Modeling
613 Intro to CNC Machining
614 Portfolio Design
615 Dig Fab Studio Supplement II
616 Design Thinking
617 Real Estate Finance
618 Dig. Fab Studio Suplmnt II
621 Structures I
622 Structures II
625 Dig Arch Studio Suplmnt
627 Dig Arch Studio Suplment II
635 History of Architecture I
636 History of Architecture II
650 History as Precedent
651 Urban Conservation
661 Digital Construction Docs
664 Advanced Topics in Digital Rep
695 Independent Studies
700 Summer Abroad Thesis Research
701 Master of Arch Stds Studio
702 Master Architectural Stds Stdo
703 Urban Design Studio
704 Adv Urban Design Studio
705 Urban Conservation Studio
706 Adv Urban Conservation
707 Sacred Space Studio
715 Pre-Design
716 Building Assemblies
717 Practice Management
721 Structures III
735 History of Modern Architecture
757 Environmental Design II
758 Environmental Design I
764 Adv. Topics in CAD
787 Architecture Thesis Guidance
791 Thesis Fieldwork/Rsrch UD
795 Independent Studies
799 Master of Arch Studies Thesis